Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Google Plus Connect on Flickr

Sir Jonathan Paul Ive goes spatial

Wednesday, 12 June, 2013

“There’s a sense of place, depth, and spatiality in iOS 7 that makes it feel like hardware,” writes John Gruber of Daring Fireball. For this, he credits Jony Ive, also known as Sir Jonathan Paul Ive, Senior Vice President of Industrial Design at Apple Inc. Gruber continues:

“There is a deep intellectual rigor to the design of iOS 7, and it’s hard not to see it as being profoundly informed by Ive’s background in hardware. In hardware, design is limited by physics: weight, density, size, connections, seams. Software doesn’t face those design limits. The old design of iOS 6 took advantage of that lack of limits, to its detriment. In iOS 6, you open a folder on the home screen, and linen is something you see underneath. You pull down Notification Center, and linen is something you see over. It’s both over and under. Hardware doesn’t work like that, but software can, because software can show you anything, conceptual logic be damned.

The design of iOS 7 is based on rules. There’s an intricate system at work, a Z-axis of layers organized in a logical way. There is a profound reduction in the use of faux-3D visual effects and textures, but iOS 7 is anything but flat. It is three dimensional not just visually but logically. It uses translucency not to show off, but to provide you with a sense of place. When you pull the new Control Center panel up from the bottom of the screen, its translucency lets you know that you haven’t gone somewhere new, you’re just looking at something over where you were.”

iOS7


Filed in: Apple • Tags: , , ,

Comments are closed.