Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Google Plus Connect on Flickr

Keep. It. Short.

Monday, 10 November, 2014

“Anger was washed away in the river along with any obligation.” Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms

In his blog, Faith and Theology, Ben Myers praises short sentences. “I have been encouraging students to aim for shorter sentences that say exactly what you want to say, not for longer sentences that sound the way you would like to sound,” he writes.

“There is nothing more atrociously cruel than an adored child.” Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

Myers supports his argument with a quote from Tertullian of Carthage. In his treatise on the Trinity Against Praxeas, Tertullian cites a list of texts used by his critics and responds with a two-word sentence: ‘Legimus omnia‘ — ‘We’ve read all that.’ Impressed by this succinctness, Myers comments, “What a sentence! Sharp as a sniper’s shot.”

Ultimately, sentence length is a matter of style and the best writers know when to balance brevity with flow. The critical thing is knowing where to place the full stop.

“Like the waters of the river, like the motorists on the highway, and like the yellow trains streaking down the Santa Fe tracks, drama, in the shape of exceptional happenings, had never stopped there.” Truman Capote, In Cold Blood


Comments are closed.