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Strong tobacco from Stark

Thursday, 12 February, 2015

“The truth is that, in contrast to many eurozone countries, Germany has reliably pursued a prudent economic policy. While others were living beyond their means, Germany avoided excess. These are deep cultural differences and the currency union brings them to light once again.” So writes Jürgen Stark, a former board member of the European Central Bank, in today’s Financial Times. “The historical and cultural differences that divide Europe’s union” is the title of the piece and it reveals all one needs to know about the division and disunion at the heart of the euro experiment.

In some ways, the comments are more revealing than the article.

This man needs to read Michael Pettis.The self satisfaction is nauseating.While the “bailout” of the German banks was going on, Siemens was flogging submarines and other much needed rubbish through a vast system of bribery and corruption. senior muppet

For the Greeks it was wonderful for many years to be able to run a political system of patrimonial privilege funded by transfers from outside the country, but that is a self-exciting system in need of a negative feedback loop – which it finally got. The upshot is that now the Greeks are being compelled to consider a choice between maintaining their old social contract or continuing to receive transfers from outside, but not both. In such cases one would normally expect a society to make the most strenuous efforts to avoid the choice. But in their anger at the unfairness of it all, the Greeks now look capable of actually, voluntarily making that choice. Amazing! This moment will not last, but in this moment all kinds of potential surprises now lurk. Whatever

Nice piece of Teutonic my-opism. German non-keynesian economics work as long as there are other countries willing to generate excess demand through borrowing and you can export to (US, China, Souther Europe). It is recipe for disaster for continental size economies. This is not a theoretical debate, the results are painfully obvious. True Finance

Sorry the disasters of the early twentieth century were German disasters. No other country was so bad. You simply cannot read across from a completely awful Germany to anywhere else. Nicki

If Mr Stark is right about the “deep cultural differences” between Eurozone countries, then why on earth did they create a common currency in the first place? This article is basically a list of all the reasons that the Euro should never have come into existence. If the Euro is to succeed, Eurozone countries must work more closely to coordinate their economic policies. It is obvious now that they cannot do so. I have always hoped that the UK would eventually join the Eurozone, but Mr Stark has finally removed the scales from my eyes. Gordon Brown was right after all. Little Briton

Meanwhile, in Spain, six years into its depression, 5.46 million people don’t have jobs, two million households have no earned income, youth unemployment is at 51.4 percent and home prices are down 42 percent. No surprise, then, that the neo-Bolivarian Podemos party is pulling ahead in the polls. The latest Metroscopia survey gave it 28 percent. The ruling conservatives have dropped to 21 percent and the once-mighty PSOE, the Spanish Workers Socialist Party, has fallen to 18 percent. The message to Jürgen Stark is clear: The elites can defend the euro, but they will lose their political base.


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