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Gatsby at 90

Monday, 13 April, 2015

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s masterpiece, The Great Gatsby, turned 90 last Friday. To mark the milestone, Rainy Day will be devoting this week’s posts to that most magical of novels.

When Fitzgerald died in 1940, aged 44, copies of the second printing of the book were piled up unsold in bookstores across the USA. Now, Scribner sells more than 500,000 copies a year. When did Gatsby go from failure to success? There’s a good argument to be made that the critical year was 1951. That was when J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye was published. At one point, Holden Caulfield notes that his older brother made him read Fitzgerald’s book. “I was crazy about The Great Gatsby,” Holden tells us. “Old Gatsby. Old sport. That killed me.” With the imprimatur of Holden Caulfield, a new generation felt compelled to read Gatsby and the momentum continues to this day.

“There was music from my neighbor’s house through the summer nights. In his blue gardens men and girls came and went like moths among the whisperings and the champagne and the stars.” — F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

Tomorrow, here, nary a superfluous word.


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