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Gatsby was cool

Friday, 17 April, 2015

By the 1920s, the word “cool” had changed from being associated solely with temperature to a term of appreciation. In 1924, Anna Lee Chisholm recorded Cool Kind Daddy Blues, and Zora Neale Hurston, in her short story The Gilded Six-Bits, wrote of a male character: “And whut make it so cool, he got money ‘cumulated. And womens give it all to ‘im.” When he came to write The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald knew that the alluring masculinity of Gatsby was summed up by “cool”:

“Who wants to go to town?” demanded Daisy insistently.
Gatsby’s eyes floated toward her.
“Ah,” she cried, “you look so cool.”
Their eyes met, and they stared together at each other, alone in space. With an effort she glanced down at the table.
“You always look so cool,” she repeated.
She had told him that she loved him, and Tom Buchanan saw. His mouth opened a little and he looked at Gatsby and then back at Daisy as if he had just recognized her as someone he knew a long time ago.”

With this excerpt, our tribute to the 90th anniversary of The Great Gatsby, first published on 10 April 1925, draws to a close. We look forward to 2025 and the centenary of the masterpiece.


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