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Big porridge

Wednesday, 6 May, 2015

The Irish milling company Flahavan’s has been run by the Flahavan family since 1785 in Kilmacthomas, County Waterford. Oatmeal became popular in the 18th century when it was mixed with whiskey as a cure for the common cold and it was around this time that oatmeal porridge became a regular breakfast dish. Note: Oats are a source of vitamin B1 (thiamin), which is crucial for the nervous system.

How to make porridge: Put 50g of oatmeal in a saucepan, pour in milk or water and add a sprinkle of salt. Bring to the boil and simmer for 4-5 minutes, stirring from time to time. Serve in a bowl and add your preferred topping.

Oats


Comments (1)

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  1. Henry Barth says:

    Too bad they do not make oat groats (steel-cut oats) which I and many other people prefer.

    Groats (or in some cases, “berries”), are the hulled kernels of various cereal grains such as oat, wheat, and rye. Groats are whole grains that include the cereal germ and fiber-rich bran portion of the grain as well as the endosperm (which is the usual product of milling).

    Groats are nutritious but hard to chew, so they are often soaked before cooking. Groats are used in soups and porridges: steel-cut oats is simply another name for sliced oat groats.

    Groats of many cereals are the basis of kasha, a porridge-like staple meal of Eastern Europe and Eurasia. In North America kasha or kashi usually refers to roasted buckwheat groats in particular.

    Parboiled and cut durum wheat groats, known as bulgur, are an essential ingredient of many Middle Eastern dishes such as mansaf and tabbouleh.

    Groats are also used in some sausages such as black puddings. A traditional dish from the Black Country in England is groaty pudding (not to be confused with groats pudding). Groaty pudding is made from soaked groats, leeks, onions, beef and beef stock, and baked for up to 16 hours; it is a traditional meal on Guy Fawkes Night.