Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Google Plus Connect on Flickr

Microsoft could make a phone with LinkedIn

Tuesday, 14 June, 2016

Last year, LinkedIn’s revenues were almost $3 billion, but it recorded a net loss of $166 million. Most of its income comes from the “talent solutions” division, which charges recruiters to advertise jobs and use the company’s data, but the rest of the network is loss making. So why is Microsoft paying $26 billion for it, then? And what will it do with this new acquisition? Paul Ford has come up with a list of 9 Things Microsoft Could Do With LinkedIn. Example:

4. Microsoft could make a phone with LinkedIn.

What? No. What? Stop. The Facebook phone was a disaster (remember? I remember.) But there’s still probably some bizarre and monstrous Blackberry-esque WindowsLinkedPhone that could happen — something that jams all the messaging through LinkedIn accounts. It could even work with SharePoint. Can you imagine?

Who will be bought up/out next? Twitter shares are rising and the talk is that Google could snap it up by the year end. Vanity Fair: Why Microsoft’s $26.2 Billion Linkedin Acquisition Is Good News For Twitter. The same Vanity Fair has a portrait of Jack Dorsey, the Twitter CEO, in the current issue. Snippet: “…he wistfully talked about the group of people, mostly friends, who helped hatch Twitter in that rodent-infested basement. Some of them became billionaires, others ended up with nothing, but most no longer speak to one another. ‘It was such a good team. It just became so screwy, and confusing. I don’t know what happened. I don’t regret it. I feel sad about it,’ he said, his voice trailing off into the night.”

All of this is good preparation for the day when Jack has to write the kind of email that LinkedIn CEO, Jeff Weiner, wrote to employees yesterday:

“No matter what you’re feeling now, give yourself some time to process the news. You might feel a sense of excitement, fear, sadness, or some combination of all of those emotions. Every member of the exec team has experienced the same, but we’ve had months to process. Regardless of the ups and downs, we’ve come out the other side knowing beyond a shadow of a doubt, this is the best thing for our company.”


Comments are closed.