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The inspired choice of Brexit as Word of the Year

Friday, 4 November, 2016

A few hours after the Collins Dictionary had named “Brexit” its Word of the Year yesterday, the High Court in London ruled that Britain cannot start the process of leaving the European Union without a vote in parliament. Clearly, Brexit is a word that will not go away in the foreseeable future. Or ever, perhaps.

Brexit Brexit means “the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union” and the word became popular as the UK headed towards June’s historic referendum. In fact, lexicographers recorded an upsurge of more than 3,400 per cent in its use this year — an increase unheard of since Collins began monitoring word usage.

Collins says “Brexit is arguably politics’ most important contribution to the English language in over 40 years, since the Watergate scandal gave commentators and comedians the suffix ‘-gate’ to make any incident or scandal infinitely more compelling.” Brexit is far more elastic than Watergate, though, because not only does it sum up the result of one of the most dramatic events in British political history, it has inspired terms such as “Bremain”, “Bremorse”, “hard Brexit” and, of course, Grexit. Note: It has also been adapted to describe unrelated events coming to an end, such as “Mexit” for Lionel Messi’s someday retirement. God forbid!


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