Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Google Plus Connect on Flickr

Coal miners as coders who get dirty

Friday, 10 February, 2017 0 Comments

When Hewlett-Packard was split in two in 2015, HP Inc focused on consumer products like PCs and printers, while Hewlett Packard Enterprise concentrated on business services such as cloud computing and data analytics. On Wednesday, the facility making ink cartridges in Kildare in Ireland told staff that up to 500 jobs will be lost at the plant. It was a nasty reminder that disruption drives the Fourth Industrial Revolution forward, fast and furiously.

Tech jobs come and tech jobs go and most will be redefined in the coming year(s) anyway as a raft of new concepts, such as the machine learning that’s been our theme there this week, make their presence felt. Clearly, the market for PCs and printers is shrinking, but those at currently at the top of the tech tree, programmers, should not rest on those laurels because as Clive Thompson has just warned readers of Wired, “The Next Big Blue-Collar Job is Coding.” But that may not be a bad thing, Thompson says:

“Across the country, people are seizing this opportunity, particularly in states hit hardest by deindustrialization. In Kentucky, mining veteran Rusty Justice decided that code could replace coal. He cofounded Bit Source, a code shop that builds its workforce by retraining coal miners as programmers. Enthusiasm is sky high: Justice got 950 applications for his first 11 positions. Miners, it turns out, are accustomed to deep focus, team play, and working with complex engineering tech. ‘Coal miners are really technology workers who get dirty,’ Justice says.”

With a story about coal miners learning to program thanks to Bit Source, we end our week of machine learning on an optimistic note.


Filed in: Technology • Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply