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Apple

Prediction

Wednesday, 12 September, 2018

Today, Apple will unveil new iPhones and other products. Some of them will have the letter “X” in their names and they will come in different sizes. Like all Apple products, they will be of hight quality, stylish and rather expensive.

And here’s the big news from Apple:


iPhone X Unleashed

Friday, 3 August, 2018

While almost everyone expects the arrival of new iPhones in September, Apple is still spending big bucks on big-budget ads for last year’s iPhone X. And, as many Twitter users have already pointed out, Apple ads featuring people using iPhones to play games while walking down the street are radical, to say the least.

Unleashed? Unprecedented? Unethical? Unwarranted? Unwise? Unsafe? Unbox!


Serenity Caldwell’s 9.7 iPad review

Tuesday, 17 April, 2018 0 Comments

“Drawn, written, edited, and produced with an iPad,” it was, she says. Bottom line: “The price is right. The tools are superb. This is the tablet I’ve been wanting since Jobs came out in 2010 to introduce the original iPad.” Serenity Caldwell admits it’s easy to make that claim, so she decided to prove it. Beginning with a blank page in the Procreate app, she created a iPad review video using her 2018 device, Apple Pencil and third-party apps.

Serenity Caldwell is the Managing Editor at iMore, and she’s “been talking, writing about, and tinkering with Apple products since she was old enough to double-click.” She really loves her 9.7 iPad.

“To me, the 2018 base-model 9.7-inch iPad is a special beast: It hits a line drive right through the company’s fabled intersection of technology and liberal arts — and at the right price point. The iPad Pro did it first, but at a cost unattainable for all but the tinkerers and serious artists, and without iOS 11’s crucial multitasking features. At $329, the iPad offers a low-end tablet experience unlike any other on the market. Add an extra $99 for Apple Pencil, and Apple has created the best device for all-purpose education, period.”


A selfie cliché is a selfie cliché is a selfie cliché

Friday, 2 February, 2018 0 Comments

“I took advantage of our tendency to be unoriginal on social media to make this animation,” says Hiérophante, who adds: “Some people point out to me that some similar videos already exists so it seems that making a video about clichés is a cliché too.” The most popular clichés include, #selfie, #peacesign, #latte, #tattoo and #sixpack, and these homogenized variations on a theme here are as trite as their creators.

PS Remember last week’s media narrative about iPhone X being less popular than expected? Here’s Apple CEO Tim Cook on the firm’s latest results:

“We’re thrilled to report the biggest quarter in Apple’s history, with broad-based growth that included the highest revenue ever from a new iPhone lineup. iPhone X surpassed our expectations and has been our top-selling iPhone every week since it shipped in November.”


“Hey Siri”

Monday, 23 October, 2017 0 Comments

Apple has published a a paper on how its devices listen for people using the “Hey Siri” command/query. There’s a lot of machine learning going on here:

“The ‘Hey Siri’ detector uses a Deep Neural Network (DNN) to convert the acoustic pattern of your voice at each instant into a probability distribution over speech sounds. It then uses a temporal integration process to compute a confidence score that the phrase you uttered was ‘Hey Siri’. If the score is high enough, Siri wakes up. This article takes a look at the underlying technology. It is aimed primarily at readers who know something of machine learning but less about speech recognition.”

Note: Apple says: “Hey Siri” works in all languages that Siri supports, but “Hey Siri” isn’t necessarily the phrase that starts Siri listening. For instance, French-speaking users need to say “Dis Siri” while Korean-speaking users say “Siri 야” (Sounds like “Siri Ya.”) In Russian it is “привет Siri” (Sounds like “Privet Siri”), and in Thai “หวัดดี Siri”. (Sounds like “Wadi Siri”.)


At the apple juice shop

Sunday, 22 October, 2017 0 Comments

“Frost sharps the middle music of the seasons, and all things living on the earth turn home again… the fields are cut, the granaries are full, the bins are loaded to the brim with fatness, and from the cider-press the rich brown oozings of the York Imperials run. The bee bores to the belly of the grape, the fly gets old and fat and blue, he buzzes loud, crawls slow, creeps heavily to death on sill and ceiling, the sun goes down in blood and pollen across the bronzed and mown fields of the old October.” — Thomas Wolfe, Of Time and the River: A Legend of Man’s Hunger in His Youth

Apple juice


Apple and the War of the Ems and the Ens

Tuesday, 11 July, 2017 0 Comments

In short: Apple’s upcoming iOS 11 will replace the convention of typing two hyphens to obtain a “long dash”, the so-called em dash —. So today, if you type – – it’s turned into —. With iOS 11, however, two hyphens become the shorter en dash: –. And to get an em dash, you’ll have to type three hyphens - - -.

Is this important? Glenn Fleishman thinks it is and he has devoted a detailed post to the matter. His conclusion: This change appears in the beta release of iOS 11, so it may not end up in the final version later this year.

By the way, the most famous em dash user was Emily Dickinson, who employed it in her poetry to emphasize emotion and punctuation —

Luck is not chance

Luck is not chance—
It’s Toil—
Fortune’s expensive smile
Is earned—
The Father of the Mine
Is that old-fashioned Coin
We spurned—

Emily Dickinson (1830 — 1886)


iPhone: A perfect 10 for the perfect device at 10

Friday, 30 June, 2017 0 Comments

“Here’s to the #iPhone that changed the world, to the man who dreamed it & the people at Apple who have never stopped looking to its future.” So tweeted @tim_cook yesterday.

It’s been ten years since the iPhone went on sale and, looking back, John Gruber gives it a “Perfect Ten.” Snippet:

“The iPhone’s potential was obviously deep, but it was so deep as to be unfathomable at the time. The original iPhone didn’t even shoot video; today the iPhone and iPhone-like Android phones have largely killed the point-and-shoot camera industry. It has obviated portable music players, audio recorders, paper maps, GPS devices, flashlights, walkie-talkies, music radio (with streaming music), talk radio (with podcasts), and more. Ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft wouldn’t even make sense pre-iPhone. Social media is mobile-first, and in some cases mobile-only.”

Gruber adds that Nokia and BlackBerry weren’t just disrupted by the iPhone, they were “utterly obliterated.” And he declares that the full potential of the iPhone is still to be discovered: “No product in the computing age compares to the iPhone in terms of societal or financial impact. Few products in the history of the world compare. We may never see anything like it again — from Apple or from anyone else.”

For all those who now say that they saw it coming, a re-reading of “Mobile, smartphones and hindsight,” which Benedict Evens published on 9 February last year continues to reward. Superbly researched, beautifully presented and elegantly written, the piece is filled with wisdom:

“It’s always fun to laugh at the people who said the future would never happen. But it’s more useful to look at the people who got it almost right, but not quite enough. That’s what happened in mobile. As we look now at new emerging industries, such as VR and AR or autonomous cars, we can see many of the same issues.”

The future happened 10 years ago and the words used by Steve Jobs when he revealed the iPhone to the world continue to echo:

“So, three things: a widescreen iPod with touch controls; a revolutionary mobile phone; and a breakthrough Internet communications device. An iPod, a phone, and an Internet communicator. An iPod, a phone… are you getting it?

These are not three separate devices, this is one device, and we are calling it iPhone.”

Perfect. 10.


WeChat is the world in China

Saturday, 6 May, 2017 0 Comments

Ben Thompson writing on Wednesday about Apple iPhone sales in China distills the challenges into one word, one app: WeChat. Here’s how he puts it:

“The fundamental issue is this: unlike the rest of the world, in China the most important layer of the smartphone stack is not the phone’s operating system. Rather, it is WeChat. Connie Chan of Andreessen Horowitz tried to explain in 2015 just how integrated WeChat is into the daily lives of nearly 900 million Chinese, and that integration has only grown since then: every aspect of a typical Chinese person’s life, not just online but also off is conducted through a single app (and, to the extent other apps are used, they are often games promoted through WeChat).”

The piece by Connie Chan referred to by Thompson is the must-read for anyone wishing to learn about the WeChat phenomenon: When One App Rules Them All: The Case of WeChat and Mobile in China. And for those who don’t get the revolution that WeChat represents, this paragraph by Ben Thompson is sobering:

“There is nothing in any other country that is comparable: not LINE, not WhatsApp, not Facebook. All of those are about communication or wasting time: WeChat is that, but it is also for reading news, for hailing taxis, for paying for lunch (try and pay with cash for lunch, and you’ll look like a luddite), for accessing government resources, for business. For all intents and purposes WeChat is your phone, and to a far greater extent in China than anywhere else, your phone is everything.”

WeChat


Appleology and Renishaw

Tuesday, 2 May, 2017 0 Comments

In the grim days of the Cold War, the expression “Kremlin Watching” had relevance. It referred less to the specific building, the Moscow Kremlin, than to what it represented: the Soviet Government. This was an institution that people had good reason to watch with care as the smallest signal might offer an indication of what was happening and what might be expected next. Out of “Kremlin Watching” grew “Kremlinology”, which persists in the English language, being used figuratively to decrypt the actions of large, powerful, opaque institutions.

Apple is one such institution and Apple Watching has become a survival skill for those who wish to understand how modern fortunes are made and lost. Back at the beginning of last month, investors woke up to the news that shares in the UK chip designer Imagination Technologies had plunged more than 60 percent after Apple said it would end a deal to use its products. Apple uses the chips in its iPhones, iPads, and iPods under a licensing agreement and its royalty payments account for about half of Imagination’s revenues. The company’s shares promptly fell 165 pence to 103 pence, valuing it at about £250 million – down from about £765 million before the announcement was made. Why? Apple Watchers revealed that Apple is developing its own chip technology.

But for every downside there’s an upside and that’s very good news for investors in Renishaw Plc. Who? “We are a global company with core skills in measurement, motion control, healthcare, spectroscopy and manufacturing,” says the Gloucestershire-based firm. But there’s more to the story than that. In a recent note to clients, Stephen Swanton of the research firm Redburn pointed out that while Renishaw has never explicitly said Apple uses its technology, a Renishaw probe was shown in an iPhone promotional video as the device’s casing was being machined. Such are the fleeting signs that Appleologists must be alert to.

“The iPhone is now made to a level of precision not far away from that at which Rolls-Royce operates with aero engine fan-blade manufacturing,” said Swanton in a display of the finest Appleology that was subsequently quoted by Bloomberg.

The iPhone 8 is predicted to launch by September, 10 years after the original iPhone premiered. Expect lots and lots of Appleology between now and then.


Expressive video, says Apple

Wednesday, 22 March, 2017 0 Comments

Cupertino, California — “Apple today introduced Clips, a new app that makes it quick and fun for anyone to create expressive videos on iPhone and iPad. The app features a unique design for combining video clips, photos and music into great-looking videos to share with friends through the Messages app, or on Instagram, Facebook and other popular social networks.”

That’s how yesterday’s PR release from Apple about its new Clips app begins. The word “expressive” does not appear anywhere in the Clips text so the curious reader has to search further for enlightenment. Is expressive video like immersive video? Or is it a format like FLV video, MP4 video or AVI video?

Susan Prescott, Apple’s VP of Apps Product Marketing, has the answer: “Clips gives iPhone and iPad users a new way to express themselves through video, and it’s incredibly easy to use.” Ah, so obvioius. And it’s incredibly easy for Apple to create new video categories. After expressive video, we can expect communicative video, indicative video, demonstrative video and assertive video, no doubt.

The most interesting aspect of Clips is what Apple calls “Live Titles.” This feature lets users create animated captions and titles using their voice. Effects include speech bubbles, shapes and posters. The captions are generated automatically, as you speak, appearing on screen synced with your voice and you can change them by adding your own text, punctuation or emoji.

Live Titles supports 36 different languages and the Clips app will be available for free in the App Store at the beginning in April. Over to you, Samsung.

Clips