Photos

The company of wolves

Thursday, 8 August, 2019

“Our writer spent 30 hours traveling with arctic wolves and gained a new appreciation for these predators of the tundra.” National Geographic’s Inside the harsh lives of wolves living at the top of the world is memorable for its text by Neil Shea and the photographs by Ronan Donovan.

To get this image of wolves picking at the remains of a muskox, “Donovan placed a camera trap inside the carcass. The pack returned to feed on and off for a month.”

photographs by Ronan Donovan


Butts

Friday, 2 August, 2019

The Urban Dictionary has its own set of descriptions and examples, but we have to scroll down to the seventh definition to find “butt” in the sense of “the remaining end of a smoked cigarette”. Ass is in there, of course, but we have to jump from there to find “bootie“, the butt word of our time. The OED offers 14 entries for butt as a noun and the most common is: “The thicker end of anything, esp. of a tool or weapon, the part by which it is held or on which it rests; e.g. the lower end of a spear-shaft, whip-handle, fishing-rod, the broad end of the stock of a gun or pistol.” According to the OED, the meaning of butt as the “remainder of a smoked cigarette” was first recorded in 1847.

Butts


Choose your picture framers carefully

Wednesday, 31 July, 2019

Fermoy


Hasselblad on the Moon

Saturday, 20 July, 2019

The Hasselblad company was established in 1841 in Gothenburg by Fritz Wiktor Hasselblad. His son, Arvid Viktor, was interested in photography and started the company’s camera division. The Hasselblad website quotes him as saying, “I certainly don’t think that we will earn much money on this, but at least it will allow us to take pictures for free.”

The most famous use of the Hasselblad camera was during the Apollo 11 mission when the first humans landed on the Moon, 50 years ago today. Almost all of the still photographs during this mission were taken using Hasselblad cameras.

Hasselblad

Note: In 2015, the Chinese drone manufacturer DJI acquired a minority interest in Hasselblad, and in early January 2017, reports indicated that DJI had acquired the majority interest. Last July, DJI’s Mavic 2 PRO drone was the first to carry a camera featuring the Hasselblad branding.


Chasing monsters

Sunday, 23 June, 2019

Sydney Morning Herald chief photographer Nick Moir has a passion for pursuing the most violent manifestations of nature. For the past 20 years he has chased bushfires around Australia and storms across America, capturing their frightening, destructive beauty. As the adventure photographer Krystle Wright puts it, “to behold a monster storm up close is to taste the infinite.” Her short video about Nick Moir cuts “straight to the heart of what fuels his obsession.”


Metamorphosis: The butterfly effect

Wednesday, 22 May, 2019

Our image today is by Dublin photographer Willie Poole, who captured this composite of nature in all its beauty. The butterfly is a well-known symbol for life after death because of its metamorphosis from an ambling caterpillar to an almost ethereal flying creature. This symbolism is of great personal meaning to Willie Poole in these days.

Butterfly by Willie Poole

“How does one become butterfly?’ Pooh asked pensively.
‘You must want to fly so much that you are willing to give up being a caterpillar,’ Piglet replied.
‘You mean to die?’ asked Pooh.
‘Yes and no,’ he answered. ‘What looks like you will die, but what’s really you will live on.” — A.A. Milne


Smell the sea, and feel the sky

Friday, 17 May, 2019

I must down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide
Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied;
And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,
And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.

John Masefield, Sea Fever

Yohan Terraza

Image: The French photographer Yohan Terraza was born in 1980 in Bordeaux. His style of landscape photography is influenced by romantic painters such as J. M. W. Turner.


The richness of the rain

Tuesday, 14 May, 2019

“I’m a London based photographer specialising in street photography and social documentary photography,” says Joshua K. Jackson. “I’m best known for using a bold palette to help illustrate the vibrancy of life in Central London, whilst also exploring themes of diversity and disparity. My work often enters into abstraction and presents the viewer with an unfamiliar view of a familiar city.”

Jackson’s photos of rain are tactile. One can feel the clouds breaking apart and falling.

Rain


Pink for a shovel

Friday, 26 April, 2019

Since the early 19th century, the colour pink has been used as a gender signifier.

Shovel


Paolo Di Paolo’s unseen images

Thursday, 11 April, 2019

Writing in the British Journal of Photography, Marigold Warner says: “Around 20 years ago, while rooting through her father’s cellar in search for a pair of skis, Silvia Di Paolo found a trunk containing 250,000 negatives, prints and slides. Aged 20 at the time, she had no idea that her father, Paolo Di Paolo, had been a photographer — let alone the top contributor to Il Mondo, one of Italy’s most popular current affairs magazines.”

The exhibition Di Paolo. Mondo Perduto will run at the MAXXI National Museum of 21st Century Arts in Rome, from 17 April to 30 June. It is curated by Giovanna Calvenzi.

Paolo Di Paolo took some memorable photos of the stars of his day: Oriana Fallaci, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Charlotte Rampling, Sofia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni, for example. This one of the actress Gina Lollogrigida and the artist Giorgio De Chirico is a classic.

Gina Lollogrigida Giorgio De Chirico


Annie Leibovitz fawns over a famous person

Thursday, 28 March, 2019

Yes, the obsequiousness is breathtaking, but Annie Leibovitz is not shy when it comes to putting her cards on the table, especially when she’s dealing with the man who has parlayed his fame into “cable-news ubiquity and a potential 2020 presidential run,” according to Vogue.

“I met him at the rally the next day, and was pretty much with their group through all of that. And we met again the next morning and did the cover. He was by himself. He didn’t have anyone there. I always admire that too. I was in a quandary about whether he should wear a blue shirt or something more relaxed. So when we went out there, I said, ‘Listen, if you’re going to run, wear the blue shirt. If you’re not going to run, let’s wear something else.’ And he said, ‘Let’s put on the blue shirt.'”

Michael Avenatti