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Theatre

Halloween: The evening of the witch

Monday, 31 October, 2016 0 Comments

The Three Witches are characters in William Shakespeare’s play Macbeth and they first appear in Act 1.1, where they greet the brave Scottish general with the grim prophecy that he shall be king. Together, they represent chaos, conflict and impending doom, and the spell they cast on Elizabethan Era audiences continues to echo down the centuries as young readers of J.K. Rowling’s popular witchcraft books will know.

Much of our fascination with witches comes from the belief in their ability to bestride the borders between the natural and the supernatural, which is part of the aura of Halloween. It’s not all that long ago when homes and barns were blessed on All Hallows’ Eve to protect people and livestock from witches, who were believed to accompany malignant spirits as they wandered the earth this night.


Horripilation: Like quills upon the fretful porpentine

Monday, 31 March, 2014 0 Comments

Each week brings with it dreadful stories that would make one’s hair stand on end. Take the one about the four princesses who say that they have been trapped in the Saudi Arabian royal compound in Jeddah for the last 13 years. The mother of the four girls was married off to King Abdullah at the age of 15, and she claims that they have been subject to constant abuse and are effectively being held under house arrest. Sadly, such tales about court intrigue are not new and Shakespeare captured the horror of it all some four centuries ago in Hamlet, where the ghost addresses the young prince:

But that I am forbid
To tell the secrets of my prison-house,
I could a tale unfold whose lightest word
Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood,
Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres,
Thy knotted and combined locks to part
And each particular hair to stand on end,
Like quills upon the fretful porpentine

Language note: Shakespeare’s “porpentine” is better known today as the porcupine, and the idiom of hair standing on end refers to the sensation of hairs, especially those on the neck, standing upright when the skin contracts due to fear. This phenomenon was once called “horripilation” and was defined in 1656 as “the standing up of the hair for fear… a sudden quaking, shuddering or shivering,” by Thomas Blount in his splendidly named Glossographia, or a dictionary interpreting such hard words as are now used.


Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Friday, 18 January, 2013 0 Comments

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof by Tennessee Williams is back on Broadway with Scarlett Johansson in the role of Maggie the Cat, who has lines like this: “Living with somebody you love can be lonelier than living entirely alone, if the one you love doesn’t love you.” And, right on the money for the […]

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