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Tag: Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol buys Brillo

Friday, 7 August, 2015 0 Comments

“We spend much of our life working to reach some kind of better place: to have a nicer house, to buy better things, perhaps to move to a different country. We are often down on average things and positive about the exotic: a meal from Panama with Japanese infusions, a holiday in Tbilisi. It is normal to feel that the exciting things are not where we are. Andy Warhol aims to remedy this by getting us to look again at things in everyday life.”

That’s according to the Book of Life, which is an offshoot of the School of Life, which is the brainchild of Alain de Botton. As regards Andy Warhol and Brillo, de Botton says:

“Warhol wants us to realise that we are already living an appealing life — to stop being down on ourselves, and ignoring ordinary experiences — filling up a car with petrol, dropping something off at the dry cleaners, microwaving a pre-made meal… We don’t need to fantasise about other places. We just need to see that the things we do all the time and the objects around us have their own merits and are enchanting in their own ways.”


Found poem

Sunday, 31 May, 2015 0 Comments

Given that “This Is Just To Say” was written as though it were a note left on a kitchen table, William Carlos Williams was once asked what makes it a poem. He replied, “In the first place, it’s metrically absolutely regular. So, dogmatically speaking, it has to be a poem because it goes that way, don’t you see!” Critic Marjorie Perloff described it as “typography rather than any kind of phonemic recurrence”. For some scholars, “This Is Just To Say” belongs between the urinals of Marcel Duchamp and the soup tins of Andy Warhol. It’s Pop Art, in other words. In fact, the term “found poetry” was created to help categorize the phenomenon.

This Is Just To Say

I have eaten
the plums
that were in
the icebox

and which
you were probably
for breakfast

Forgive me
they were delicious
so sweet
and so cold

William Carlos Williams, (1883 – 1963)

The Disruptive Polaroid

Friday, 5 December, 2014 0 Comments

To celebrate its 85th birthday, Businessweek has listed the 85 most disruptive ideas that have emerged during its lifetime. They range from GDP to the jet engine, and in between there’s the Pill, Singapore, <h1>HTML</h1>, Starbucks and the AK-47. When you mouse-over No. 84, it makes the whirring sound of a Polaroid picture being taken, and that’s because Edward Land’s innovation is adjudged to be one of the most disruptive ideas in recent times. In his tribute to the camera, Christopher Makos writes:

Polaroids were the first social network. You’d take a picture, and someone would say, “I want one, too,” so you’d give it away and take another. People shared Polaroids the way they now share information on social media. Of course, it was more personal, because you were sharing with just one person, not the entire world.

I met Andy Warhol in the ’70s at the Whitney Museum and started doing projects with him because he loved my photographs. He’d never had a pal who was a photographer, so I was his guru, showing him what cameras to buy, what pictures to take. Andy loved Polaroid. Everything was “gee whiz”; it was brand-new. So immediate.

Taking a selfie with a Polaroid is also very intimate. They weren’t called selfies back then, obviously. People weren’t as self-aware. We didn’t have 10 years of reality TV shows in the social consciousness. But Polaroid marked the beginning of self-awareness.


Shopping for John and Yoko

Monday, 21 October, 2013 0 Comments

Starting in November 1976, Monday through Friday, Andy Warhol phoned his secretary Pat Hackett each morning and told her about the happenings of the previous day and night. After transcribing the monologue onto paper, Hackett would then type up the pages. Apart from wishing to document his life and times, Warhol had an ulterior motive for keeping a diary: satisfying the tax man. The Internal Revenue Service audited him annually and he liked to present his minute side of the story to the accountants. In all, Warhol dictated more than 20,000 pages, which Ms Hackett dutifully put down on paper.

Published in 1989, Pat Hackett’s Andy Warhol Diaries (mercifully condensed to 807 pages) begins on 24 November 1976 and ends 11 years later on 17 February 1987, just a few days before the artist’s death. Here’s today’s entry:

21 October 1980: “I ran into a boy whose job is to go shopping for John [Lennon] and Yoko [Ono], to buy them clothes and things. I asked him if they’d ever made him bring anything back and he said just once. I asked him if they ever wore any of the clothes they bought since they don’t go out, and he said, ‘They’re going to make a comeback. They’ve been wearing them to the studio.’ Oh, and the best thing he said was that when he started to work for them he had to sign a paper that said, ‘I will not write a book about John Leonnon and/or Yoko Ono.’ Isn’t that great? He said he loves his job. I should find somebody to help me shop — show me where all the good new things are.” Andy Warhol

Six weeks later, on the night of 8 December 1980, Mark David Chapman shot John Lennon four times in the back at the entrance to his New York apartment in the Dakota Building. Lennon was declared dead on arrival at nearby Roosevelt Hospital.

Andy Warhol

Warhol upgraded from 15 minutes to 6 seconds

Friday, 25 January, 2013 0 Comments

In 1968, Andy Warhol said that “In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes.” The prediction was an immediate hit as it hit the nail of the nascent celebrity culture right on the head. But that was then and in 2013 the Zeitgeist has sped up to the point where 15 minutes feels like an eternity. Enter Vine, which is based on a tweeted version of the Warholian concept that now reads, “In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 6 seconds.” And that fame will loop eternally.

But isn’t six seconds an absurdly short time frame for anything? To even ask the question is to misunderstand the nature of sharing online. According to Wired: “It’s clear that Vine’s unique recording process, and specific six-second time limitation, is what will spark creative videos.”