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Tag: Chavez

Hasta Cuando? Venezuela

Saturday, 27 June, 2015 0 Comments

Reuters: “One hundred and twenty policemen have been murdered so far this year in Venezuela, one of the world’s most violent countries, a local watchdog said on Friday.” Appalled by the crime and corruption now gripping her homeland, the Venezuelan pianist and composer Gabriela Montero is using her music to challenge the propaganda of the Chávez/Maduro regimes and question the ideology that has bankrupted the country.

Born in 1970 in Caracas, Gabriela Montero now lives in Los Angeles. In Una improvisación sobre la violencia en Venezuela, she asks: How Long More?


Once upon a time in a land called Venezuela

Tuesday, 10 March, 2015 0 Comments

My, my, a lot can change in a short time. Back on 13 December 2012, famed Hugo Chávez bot Richard Gott reflected on the state of Venezuela in the Guardian. Was he alarmed, dismayed, perturbed? None of it. In fact, he painted an idyllic picture with phrases such as “huge oil revenues”, “competent team of ministers”, “running the country quite happily”, “no immediate crises”, “economy is purring along quite well” and the oleaginous “engaging and collegiate leader” for Comrade Maduro. Snippet:

Chavez “After 14 years of considerable institutional change, huge oil revenues now pour into the alleviation of the acute poverty suffered by a large percentage of the country, and there is a rock-solid base of chavista support that will take decades to erode. Chávez also leaves a competent team of ministers at the top, most of whom have been running the country quite happily in recent years. They share the radical vision of Chávez, and in Maduro they have an engaging and collegiate leader. There are no immediate crises in sight and, in spite of alarmist reports in the foreign press, the economy is purring along quite well. After more than a decade on a political roller-coaster, the country will return to a more normal profile.”

And today? Dissent, inflation and shortages of basic goods dominate the agenda. “President Nicolas Maduro’s socialist government this week launched a 70 percent devaluation via a new ‘free floating’ currency system known as Simadi” reported Reuters last month. “‘They’re doing this because they don’t have any money,’ said a man who gave his name only as Felix, and who said he was 83.”

Note: Richard Gott was once the literary editor of the Guardian, but he resigned from the post in 1994 after it was alleged in The Spectator that he had been a KGB “agent of influence”. He rejected the claim, arguing that “Like many other journalists, diplomats and politicians, I lunched with Russians during the Cold War”. With the Russians said to be looking for lunch partners again, Richard Gott need never dine alone.


Snowden and the Venezuelan gangsters

Thursday, 11 July, 2013 0 Comments

The economy of Venezuela has been ruined by the Hugo Chavez/Nicolas Maduro regime, under the tutelage of the Castro brothers. Detailing their crimes, Gustavo Coronel writes:

“They have stripped the Venezuelan Central Bank of much of its international reserves and Petroleos de Venezuela of its oil income, in order to place the money in a non-transparent parallel fund called FONDEN. According to Economist Pedro Palma this fund has received up to $105 billion from these institutions. The money has been managed very discretionally, with no accountability by four persons: H. Chavez/N. Maduro, Jorge Giordani, Rafaél Ramírez and Nelson Merentes. Much of the money has been utilized for partisan political purposes.”

Into the arms of these thieves and ruffians, Edward Snowden is said to be determined to flee.

When the British traitor Kim Philby fled Beirut in January 1963 for Moscow, the chattering classes praised his heroic defection from the decadent West. On 30 July Soviet officials announced that they had granted him political asylum in the USSR, along with Soviet citizenship. We know how that “paradise” ended.


Former bus driver Nicolas Maduro at the wheel in Venezuela

Friday, 14 December, 2012 0 Comments

Richard Gott, former Latin America correspondent and features editor of the Guardian, resigned from the British newspaper in 1994 after claims that he had been a Soviet “agent of influence”. But you can’t keep a good sympathizer down and Gott regularly resurfaces in the Guardian whenever “the revolution” needs defending. With Hugo Chávez’s Bolívarian revolution […]

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