Tag: design

A New World version of an alimentari in Vancouver

Sunday, 17 February, 2019

“Channeling the effortless elegance of historic Italian interiors, and offering an eclectic selection of Italian culinary delights, Caffè La Tana in Vancouver is a revamped, New World version of an Italian alimentari, a small, family-owned grocery shop that you can find in most Italian neighborhoods,” declares Yatzer

La Tana was designed by the Vancouver studio Ste. Marie and the idea is of a “den”, which in Italian is loosely translated as la tana. The den here is that of the cunning fox, la savio volpe, and the cunning fox happens to be the mascot of Ste. Marie’s creative director Craig Stanghetta. (Photo: Ian Lanterman).

La Tana


Netflix does design

Tuesday, 24 January, 2017 0 Comments

“A chair is the first thing you need when you don’t really need anything, and is therefore a peculiarly compelling symbol of civilization. For it is civilization, not survival, that requires design.” — Ralph Caplan

The art of design is the theme of Abstract, an documentary series from Netflix that starts on 10 February. The eight episodes will profile a designer at the top of their discipline: architect Bjarke Ingels, automotive designer Ralph Gilles, illustrator Christoph Niemann, interior designer Ilse Crawford, graphic designer Paula Scher, photographer Platon, stage designer Es Devlin and shoe designer Tinker Hatfield.

“So that’s our approach. Very simple, and we’re really shooting for Museum of Modern Art quality. The way we’re running the company, the product design, the advertising, it all comes down to this: ‘Let’s make it simple. Really simple.’ Apple’s design mantra would remain the one featured on its first brochure: ‘Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.'” — Steve Jobs

NEWS: Apple’s Mac Pro, Touch Bar MacBook and original Air designer, Matt Casebolt, will now be designing Teslas.


Porto

Saturday, 8 August, 2015 0 Comments

“After walking camino in spain , i went to porto for having a break time in portugal. And then, i fell in love with its scenery, people, colors and so on. I decided to capture its beauty and stay more than i expected.” So writes Lee Hang Gab, a South Korean film/design artist with an eye for beauty and an ability to capture it.


Vexillography and Mars

Wednesday, 20 May, 2015 0 Comments

Just learned today that the scientific study of flags is called vexillology, and the practice of designing flags is called vexillography. For that useful information, we’re indebted to Oskar Pernefeldt, who had designed the International Flag of Planet Earth as a graduation project at Beckmans College of Design in Stockholm. The flag could be used by explorers “representing planet Earth” as they travel across the solar system says the idealistic young Oskar, and he envisages it being planted on the arid soil of the Red Planet to mark the creation of an “Eventual colony on Mars in 2025.”

Earth flag on Mars

That’s pretty much in line with the projections of Elon Musk: “I think we’ve got a decent shot of sending a person to Mars in about 11 or 12 years,” he said last month during an episode of Neil deGrasse Tyson’s StarTalk Radio show. FuturePundit is pouring cold water on this, however. Send robots first, he says. Argument:

“Only send humans once enough robots have broken down to justify a repair team visit. First thing we have to be aware of: Mars is a very hostile environment for humans. Little atmosphere, too much radiation, too cold, too far from the Sun, low on nitrogen (which is probably a bigger problem than low on water), very costly to ship to, too far away to do remote real-time control of equipment. Really a very unappetizing place to live.”

All very reasonable, no doubt, but the future belongs to optimists and visionaries like Oskar Pernefeldt and Elon Musk.


Of watches and cities

Monday, 9 March, 2015 0 Comments

Apple is holding one of its famous product-presentation events in San Francisco today. The focus will be on the company’s Watch, which is a big bet for Apple as  this is its first major product launch since the iPad, five years ago, and the first one under CEO Tim Cook’s leadership. If we’re so good at making things like watches and phones, how come we’re getting worse at making beautiful cities? That’s the question posed by the London-based Swiss thinker Alain de Botton in “How to Make an Attractive City,” a new video from the School of Life.

The best cities are a mix of wide and narrow streets, says de Botton. A city should be easy to navigate for both humans and vehicles, with avenues for orientation and alleys that allow us to wander and experience a sense of mystery.


Wanted: a Foster of fenestration

Tuesday, 13 May, 2014 0 Comments

Dan Hill cannot be accused of inactivity. Along with writing the City of Sound blog, which stands at the crossroads of urban design, culture and technology, he’s “executive director of futures” at Future Cities Catapult, a global centre of excellence on urban innovation, and he somehow finds time for the job of adjunct professor in the Design, Architecture and Building faculty at the University of Technology in Sydney. In this piece for Dezeen on the challenges posed by crumbling city infrastructures, Dan Hill is on song:

“Though it once seemed unlikely that we would have a Steve Jobs of thermostats and smoke alarms, it turns out that’s the culture Nest emerges from. And perhaps it suggests that we also need an Isozaki of insulation, a Foster of fenestration, a Prouvé of plumbing, a Rogers of rewiring, an Utzon of U-values… and more importantly again, a development or investment model that enables service retrofit within a market shaped to value that.”

Language note: Dan Hill applies alliteration there to nice effect and the use of words beginning with the same sound, which was once popular with poets, is now beloved of rappers. The late Tupac Shakur’s If I Die 2Nite is typical: “My enemies scatter in suicidal situations / Never to witness the wicked shit that they was facin.” By the way, most of Shakur’s songs revolved around themes Dan Hill would be familiar with: violence and hardship in crumbling cities.


Twitter’s third column

Friday, 9 May, 2014 0 Comments

As Twitter rolls out a new look that adds a third column for users accessing the service with a web browser the message is clear: your tweets are front and centre. The new, full-sized layout centralizes tweets and moves secondary information to the sides. The “Who to follow” widget has been moved from beneath the profile bio on the left to the right, where it sits above the Trends block.

Twitter

Language note: Ernest Hemingway included the word “column” in the title of his only play, which he wrote in Madrid while the city was being bombarded during the Spanish Civil War. It was published in 1938 as The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories. It is said that Emilio Mola, a Nationalist General, told a journalist in 1936 that as his four columns of troops approached Madrid, a “fifth column” of supporters inside the city would support him and undermine the Republican government from within. The term spread then beyond the borders of Spain and came to define any group of people who destabilize a larger group, such as a movement or nation from the inside.

Political note: In an address to Parliament on 18 March this year, Vladimir Putin “raised the spectre of ‘a fifth column’ — a ‘disparate bunch of national traitors’ — sowing discord inside Russia.”


Sir Jonathan Paul Ive goes spatial

Wednesday, 12 June, 2013 0 Comments

“There’s a sense of place, depth, and spatiality in iOS 7 that makes it feel like hardware,” writes John Gruber of Daring Fireball. For this, he credits Jony Ive, also known as Sir Jonathan Paul Ive, Senior Vice President of Industrial Design at Apple Inc. Gruber continues:

“There is a deep intellectual rigor to the design of iOS 7, and it’s hard not to see it as being profoundly informed by Ive’s background in hardware. In hardware, design is limited by physics: weight, density, size, connections, seams. Software doesn’t face those design limits. The old design of iOS 6 took advantage of that lack of limits, to its detriment. In iOS 6, you open a folder on the home screen, and linen is something you see underneath. You pull down Notification Center, and linen is something you see over. It’s both over and under. Hardware doesn’t work like that, but software can, because software can show you anything, conceptual logic be damned.

The design of iOS 7 is based on rules. There’s an intricate system at work, a Z-axis of layers organized in a logical way. There is a profound reduction in the use of faux-3D visual effects and textures, but iOS 7 is anything but flat. It is three dimensional not just visually but logically. It uses translucency not to show off, but to provide you with a sense of place. When you pull the new Control Center panel up from the bottom of the screen, its translucency lets you know that you haven’t gone somewhere new, you’re just looking at something over where you were.”

iOS7


The depraved architects of death

Wednesday, 25 July, 2012

Architecture in Uniform: Designing and Building for the Second World War by the French architectural historian and architect Jean-Louis Cohen establishes “one big, awful, inescapable truth”, writes Martin Filler in the New York Review of Books. According to Filler: “the full potential of twentieth-century architecture, engineering, and design was realized not in the social-welfare and […]

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