Tag: fish

Whiting with turnip and carrot

Saturday, 5 January, 2019

The turnip (Brassica rapa) is a root vegetable grown in temperate climates worldwide and Ireland’s damp weather is ideal for it. The word turnip, by the way, comprises tur- as in turned/rounded on a lathe and neep, derived from Latin napus, the word for the plant. In Scotland, the turnip is often called a neep, while in North America turnip (or neep) usually refers to rutabaga, a yellow root vegetable in the same genus (Brassica) and also known in England as a swede (from “Swedish turnip”). Interestingly, the term rutabaga comes from the Swedish word “rotabagge.”

In Irish cuisine, boiled turnip is a popular side dish with a bacon dinner. Today, mixed with carrot, it accompanied whiting. Delicious, delightful, delectable.

Turnip and whiting


Grazing at large in meadows submarine

Monday, 15 October, 2018

“It was the kind of Sunday to make one ache for Monday morning,” wrote Joan Didion in South and West: From a Notebook. Monday has a questionable reputation but not everyone complains about the day. On Monday, 26 April 1784, the notable English poet William Cowper dined on a flatfish of the genus Hippoglossus from the family of right-eye flounders and was very pleased with the result.

Language note: “wast” is an archaic spelling of the second-person singular simple past form of be, and the adjective “minikin” means small; insignificant.

To The Immortal Memory Of The Halibut, On Which I Dined This Day, Monday, April 26, 1784

Where hast thou floated, in what seas pursued
Thy pastime? When wast thou an egg new spawned,
Lost in the immensity of ocean’s waste?
Roar as they might, the overbearing winds
That rocked the deep, thy cradle, thou wast safe —
And in thy minikin and embryo state,
Attached to the firm leaf of some salt weed,
Didst outlive tempests, such as wrung and racked
The joints of many a stout and gallant bark,
And whelmed them in the unexplored abyss.
Indebted to no magnet and no chart,
Nor under guidance of the polar fire,
Thou wast a voyager on many coasts,
Grazing at large in meadows submarine,
Where flat Batavia just emerging peeps
Above the brine, — where Caledonia’s rocks
Beat back the surge, — and where Hibernia shoots
Her wondrous causeway far into the main.
— Wherever thou hast fed, thou little thoughtst,
And I not more, that I should feed on thee
Peace, therefore, and good health, and much good fish,
To him who sent thee! — and success, as oft
As it descends into the billowy gulf,
To the same dreg that caught thee! — Fare thee well!
Thy lot thy brethren of the slimy fin
Would envy, could they know that thou wast doomed
To feed a bard, and to be praised in verse.

William Cowper (1731 – 1800)

Halibut


Cats have kittens, bats have bittens

Sunday, 19 July, 2015 0 Comments

Ogden Nash was famous for his light verse and he wrote more than 500 waggish pieces during his lifetime. The poet entered Harvard University in 1920, only to drop out a year later. He then worked as a teacher for a year at his alma mater, St. George’s School in Newport County, Rhode Island, before heading to New York to sell bonds, about which he later remarked, “Came to New York to make my fortune as a bond salesman and in two years sold one bond — to my godmother. However, I saw lots of good movies.” In 1934, Nash moved to Baltimore, where he remained until his death in 1971. “I could have loved New York had I not loved Balti-more,” he said, Nashlike.

Note: The guppy (Poecilia reticulata) is one of the world’s most widely distributed tropical fish.

The Guppy

Whales have calves,
Cats have kittens,
Bears have cubs,
Bats have bittens,
Swans have cygnets,
Seals have puppies,
But guppies just have little guppies.

Ogden Nash (1902 – 1971)


Fish on Friday

Friday, 27 April, 2012

Here’s my mother’s recipe for smoked haddock, a dish that appears on the home table on Fridays. This serves four, by the way: 500g smoked haddock 1 onion 2 carrots nut of butter 1/2 cup of milk 1 tablespoon of white flour salt and pepper Preparation: Cut the haddock into four strips and dust with […]

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