Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Google Plus Connect on Flickr

Tag: Guardian

The Age of Hypocrisy

Wednesday, 21 March, 2018 1 Comment

Without a hint self-reflection the Guardian asks: “Facebook: is it time we all deleted our accounts?” Why is this Hypocrisy with a capital H? Because the same Guardian has a community of almost eight million “likers” on Facebook and it uses the platform to flog its products. There’s no sign of the Guardian deleting that account, though.

The same goes for the much-praised post by Whatsapp co-founder Brian Acton on Twitter: “It is time. #deletefacebook.” As the world knows, Facebook bought WhatsApp for $19 billion in 2014 and the company implemented the policy Acton is objecting to now in 2010, four years before he trousered $6.5 billion of Zuck’s money. Acton knew full well what Facebook was when he sold WhatsApp to them but now, with those Facebook billions in the bank, he’s wants us to believe that he’s a privacy advocate. That’s rich, Brian, and it’s every bit as convincing as the Guardian pontificating about deleting Facebook accounts when it’s using data gleaned from Facebook to market its wares.

This is the Age of Hypocrisy


The chavs vs. the guardians

Sunday, 26 June, 2016 0 Comments

The shockwaves from the decision on Thursday by a majority of UK voters to leave the European Union continue to reverberate. The governing Tory party was bitterly divided on the issue before the campaign and now the aftermath turmoil is ripping the Labour party apart. Collateral damage has been caused to language, too.

In a result that was driven by contempt for the establishment, demands to restore sovereignty and fear of mass migration, puzzled pundits have been looking for explanations. This is trickier than it sounds because it’s clear that the majority vote for leave was made possible by those who live outside London. What to call these people? We’re in tippy-toe area here because many in the commentariat would like to say the leavers are “English” in a manner that implies “little Englanders,” but the Welsh voted for leave as well, so a bigger umbrella is needed. Behind the hand, racist and populist and all the other pejoratives are being thrown around, but they cannot be used in public as they say almost as much about the speaker as the subject.

Chav gear Here’s a solution: chav. And before people reach for the off button, consider this: “Chavs are supposed to wear a lot of flashy jewellery, white trainers, baseball caps, sham designer clothes. Girls expose a lot of midriff. Nothing racial about it all, I should say.” So says linguistics expert David Crystal. They live mainly on council estates in middle England and they love their telly and tabloids, do the chavs. Perfect.

And those who opted to remain? How about guardians? They wanted to guard Britain’s membership of the European Union more than their own union, and the Guardian newspaper is their intellectual platform. London is their base and they consider themselves post-national. But as Megan McArdle points out in ‘Citizens of the World’? Nice Thought, But …:

Journalists and academics seemed to feel that they had not made it sufficiently clear that people who oppose open borders are a bunch of racist rubes who couldn’t count to 20 with their shoes on, and hence will believe any daft thing they’re told. Given how badly this strategy had just failed, this seemed a strange time to be doubling down. But perhaps, like the fellow I once saw lose a packet by betting on 17 for 20 straight turns of the roulette wheel, they reasoned that the recent loss actually makes a subsequent victory more likely, since the number has to come up sometime.

In the referendum on Thursday, the chavs voted and the guardians tweeted. Now, the guardians are petitioning. That’s the difference. Or, put another way:


Who lost in New Hampshire?

Tuesday, 9 February, 2016 0 Comments

Prediction: The big losers in New Hampshire will be the media. The obsessional coverage of Donald Trump and his every quip and comment has put the issues in second place. Donald Trump “Now the airwaves are cluttered, there are too many messages, and in a Tower of Babel society we all focus on that which everybody else does,” wrote Bob Lefsetz in his newsletter a week ago. Snippet:

“But that does not mean television and newspapers did not love telling his story, it injected excitement, it sold advertising, and in the era of big data it was all opinion all the time. True, there were polls showing Trump with significant traction, but the data pros said that at this point in the game polls are unusually inaccurate.

But don’t let the facts get in the way of a good story.”

What we are witnessing in this phase of the US presidential race is herd media. The New York York Times has already decided that Hillary Clinton is the best choice, while the Guardian calculates that whipping up Trump frenzy is good click bait. The only alternative to the biased, cynical MSM looks like being Twitter.


How did the UN get it so wrong on Julian Assange?

Saturday, 6 February, 2016 0 Comments

That’s the question posed by Joshua Rozenberg in the Guardian. “Assange has always been free to leave the embassy at any time,” says Rozenberg, adding: “Of course, he knew he would be arrested for breach of his bail conditions. Of course, he knew he would face extradition to Sweden. Of course, he knew that he might face extradition to the United States once proceedings in Sweden were at an end. But that does not mean he was detained, and still less that his detention was of an arbitrary character.”

Rozenberg outlines the faulty logic of the UN working group, but it is his colleague Marina Hyde who really gets to the heart of the matter with this devastating assessment of Assange: “He can issue limitless portentous statements, and declaim from all the Juliet balconies he likes, but for my money he looks more and more like just another guy failing to face up to a rape allegation.”

Elisabeth Massi Fritz, the lawyer for Julian Assange’s alleged victim, named as SW, was as critical of the UN group as she was of the purported rapist. She told the Daily Mirror:

“The panel seems to have a lack of understanding of the fact the alleged rape of a woman is one of the most serious violations and abuses of human rights.

That a man arrested on probable cause for rape should be awarded damages because he has deliberately withheld himself from the judicial system for over five years is insulting and offensive to my client — and all victims.

It is time that Assange packs his bag, steps out of the embassy and begins to cooperate with the Swedish Prosecuting Authority.”

Both the UN and Assange have emerged from this looking shabby and shameless.


This post has been removed pending investigation.

Friday, 17 January, 2014 0 Comments

Well, that’s what it says at the freedom-loving Guardian. The title of the post? “Forget funeral selfies. What are the ethics of tweeting a terminal illness?” The removal took place on 8 January and on Tuesday this week, Guardian readers were treated to another Orwellian notice: “Removed: article.” Is Alan Rusberger going rogue?


Questions for the scam-artist @arusbridger at the @Guardian

Friday, 23 August, 2013 9 Comments

Louise Mensch has them, and they’re good. For example:

You state

The Guardian paid for Miranda’s flights. Miranda is not an employee of the Guardian. As Greenwald’s partner, he often assists him in his work and the Guardian normally reimburses the expenses of someone aiding a reporter in such circumstances

You paid for David Miranda’s flights and expenses because, you claim, he was “assisting Glenn Greenwald” in his work.

But how was he assisting Glenn Greenwald? If he was transporting purely “journalistic materials” why did Greenwald not use FedEx? If the data needed to be secure, why not use a P2P fileshare site? Why did the Guardian approve paying Miranda’s expenses when there are direct flights from Berlin to Rio that Poitras and Greenwald could have used?

Is it because Glenn Greenwald explained to you that as a US citizen he could not email, transport, or securely share stolen information about US and UK intelligence operations against foreign regimes without committing a serious felony and needed to use his husband as a mule?

In that case is not Guardian Media Group corporately responsible for abetting espionage against the United States and United Kingdom?

Yes, it is.


The Guardian and its “faux-scandal”

Friday, 14 June, 2013 1 Comment

It takes a brave person to defend the NSA and its surveillance remit, but David Simon, writer of “The Wire,” is not afraid to step up. In a blog post titled “We are shocked, shocked…,” he declares: “Having labored as a police reporter in the days before the Patriot Act, I can assure all there has always been a stage before the wiretap, a preliminary process involving the capture, retention and analysis of raw data. It has been so for decades now in this country. The only thing new here, from a legal standpoint, is the scale on which the FBI and NSA are apparently attempting to cull anti-terrorism leads from that data. But the legal and moral principles? Same old stuff.” And, he adds:

“But those planes really did hit those buildings. And that bomb did indeed blow up at the finish line of the Boston marathon. And we really are in a continuing, low-intensity, high-risk conflict with a diffuse, committed and ideologically-motivated enemy. And for a moment, just imagine how much bloviating would be wafting across our political spectrum if, in the wake of an incident of domestic terrorism, an American president and his administration had failed to take full advantage of the existing telephonic data to do what is possible to find those needles in the haystacks. After all, we as a people, through our elected representatives, drafted and passed FISA and the Patriot Act and what has been done here, with Verizon and assuredly with other carriers, is possible under that legislation.”

The Guardian is home to some very nasty types still in pain following the defeat of the tyrants they so ardently supported, from Stalin to Chavez. Since the defeat of communism, this lot has flirted with everything from Islamism to feminism in the hope of gaining some relevance again, but each “ism” is worse than the other and all that’s left now is the “faux-scandal”. Same old stuff.


Comment was free

Wednesday, 16 January, 2013 0 Comments

Julie Burchill is an English journalist and a self-declared “militant feminist”. Beginning at The New Musical Express at the age of 17, she graduated to the mainstream press and her work now appears regularly in newspapers such as The Guardian, The Sunday Times and The Observer. A Google search yesterday for “Julie Burchill” brought up […]

Continue Reading »

Slovenly Slate, ghastly Guardian, zany Zeit smear of Paul Ryan

Wednesday, 15 August, 2012

The biased nature of what passes for journalism today was on full display yesterday when three media organs participated in a smear of Paul Ryan that would be laughable were it not so dreadful. First up was Slate, where the Andrew Sullivan lookalike, typealike Matthew Yglesias could not resist repackaging unsupported insider trading accusations leveled […]

Continue Reading »

The Guardian tries its hand at Syrian satire

Thursday, 9 August, 2012

It’s been a while since Rainy Day has read Seamus Milne, the Guardian-based apologist for everything from jihad to communism. This week, he tried his hand at satire by laying the blame for the Syrian slaughter firmly at the doorstep of the West. In doing so, he pushed all the buttons beloved of the left: […]

Continue Reading »

A vote of confidence in the euro

Thursday, 15 December, 2011

The outlook for the “Project”, as the crazed commissars in Brussels call their beloved common currency, is grim and prospect of implosion is so threatening that even Guardian columnists are pondering THE END, but this does not mean that a contrarian must run with the herd. Quite the opposite, in fact. So, when the manufacturer of the new Rainy Day laptop offered the option of a keyboard with the euro symbol, we voted for it. If the currency, miraculously, manages to survive, it’ll be handy to have at hand, and should the euro go down in flames, the value of the computer will increase due to the antiquarian aspect of the keyboard. Win win!