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Tag: Horace

Carpe diem for 2018

Monday, 31 December, 2018

The departing 2018 brings to mind Horace’s Ode 1.11, which contains that much-quoted Latin phrase — Carpe diem (“Seize the day!”). Writing to his friend Leuconoe, Horace tries to convince him to avoid thinking about tomorrow and to forget, too, about asking astrologers to peer into the future. Instead, he encourages Leuconoe to “seize the day!” — to make every day count and to stop relying on the hope that tomorrow will bring something better. Ode 1.11 admonishes us to remember that we are not promised tomorrow, and the related Latin expression memento mori (remember that you are mortal) carries some of the same connotation as carpe diem. For Horace, awareness of our own mortality is key in making us realize the importance of the moment. In other words: Remember that you are mortal, so make the most of today.

Ode 1.11

Ask not — we cannot know — what end the gods have set for you, for me;
nor attempt the Babylonian reckonings Leuconoe.
How much better to endure whatever comes,
whether Jupiter grants us additional winters or whether this is our last,
which now wears out the Tuscan Sea upon the barrier of the cliffs.
Be wise, strain the wine; and since life is brief, prune back far-reaching hopes.
Even while we speak, envious time has passed:
Seize the day, putting as little trust as possible in tomorrow.

Horace (65 BC – 8 BC)

Tu ne quaesieris, scire nefas, quem mihi, quem tibi
finem di dederint, Leuconoe, nec Babylonios
temptaris numeros. ut melius, quidquid erit, pati.
seu pluris hiemes seu tribuit Iuppiter ultimam,
quae nunc oppositis debilitat pumicibus mare
Tyrrhenum. Sapias, vina liques et spatio brevi
spem longam reseces. dum loquimur, fugerit invida
aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.


They are not long, the days of wine and roses

Tuesday, 3 October, 2017 0 Comments

Sunday night’s mass murder in Las Vegas fills one with despair. What kind of rage or madness drives a person to do something so barbarous? Can it be detected? Treated? Which mental health checks can be done to prevent people acquiring fully automatic AR-15 style assault rifles with high capacity magazines?

As we wait for answers to all those questions, our attention should be focussed not on the killer but on his victims. They, and their families and friends, are the ones deserving sympathy and attention today. Those slaughtered were enjoying the music; they were living their lives when death was poured down upon them. To their memory, then, we dedicate Vitae Summa Brevis Spem Nos Vetat Incohare Longam by Ernest Dowson, an English poet who died aged 32 in 1900. In his short life and few poems, he created vivid phrases such as “gone with the wind,” “I have been faithful… in my fashion” and “days of wine and roses”.

Vitae Summa Brevis Spem Nos Vetat Incohare Longam

“The brief sum of life forbids us the hope of enduring long.” — Horace

They are not long, the weeping and the laughter,
Love and desire and hate:
I think they have no portion in us after
We pass the gate.

They are not long, the days of wine and roses:
Out of a misty dream
Our path emerges for a while, then closes
Within a dream.

Ernest Dowson (1867 – 1900)


New York Times reports will consist of a sentence.

Wednesday, 1 April, 2015 0 Comments

Yes, it is April 1st, but this is not a Fool’s Day prank. The New York Times has developed an app to provide news reports for the Apple watch, which will consist of a sentence. “Readers can swipe through these stories and get a quick glance, if they only have a few seconds and want to get caught up,” said Andrew Phelps, a senior product manager at the newspaper.

BTW, he could have saved a word by using “catch up” instead of “get caught up” there.

Wikipedia disapproves: “One sentence does not an article make.” And the NYT should note that the one-sentence discipline is a tough one: “After nine years, I’ve decided to shut down One Sentence,” wrote the proprietor of One Sentence, 3,1932 minutes ago.

Finally, long before the Apple Watch was imagined at 1 Infinite Loop in Cupertino, the Roman poet, Horace, warned: Brevis esse laboro, obscurus fio (“I struggle to be brief, and become obscure.”)

Apple Watch