Tag: Huawei

The China Menace

Monday, 3 June, 2019

Our posts this week will be devoted to China, a nation that has made authoritarianism terrifyingly efficient. One of the ways in which it has managed this feat is through the theft of Western intellectual property. Example: Huawei. Its name translates as “Accomplish for China,” and Huawei will do whatever China orders. China is Huawei and Huawei is China, in other words. But Huawei is not unique in this regard because no Chinese company is independent.

Founded in 1987. Huawei claims to be “employee-owned,” but it could not have become the world’s largest manufacturer of telecommunications network equipment and the second-largest maker of smartphones on its own. Allegations of theft have followed Huawei from its earliest days. Cisco Systems was one of its first targets. It sued Huawei in 2003 for the theft of source code for routers. The two companies settled in 2004, but they were back in the news in 2012 when Cisco disclosed that Huawei had copied source code, help screens and manuals.

The sheer shamelessness of Huawei’s thievery is breath-taking. Earlier this year, unsealed indictments handed down by a grand jury in the Western District of the State of Washington against two Huawei affiliates documented 10 Federal crimes relating to the theft of the intellectual property of T-Mobile. In the most brazen act of all, Huawei employees surreptitiously dismembered Tappy, a T-Mobile robot, and walked away with its arm.

Tomorrow here, Tank Man. The photo that China wants to erase from memory.

The China Menace


Huawei’s sinister EU campaign

Thursday, 23 May, 2019

With friends like these…

“The European Union is a great success story. Since the historical Schuman Declaration of 9 May 1950, the integration process has brought Europeans unprecedented prosperity and stability.” So begins the sermon from Huawei, a front corporation for the Chinese Communist Party that also makes network equipment and phones. Two days ago, in its Orwellian-named Cybersecurity Transparency Centre in Brussels, this least transparent of companies, held a “debate” at which it “reaffirmed its commitment to roll out 5G” the ‘European Way’, whatever way that is.

Huawei’s Abraham Liu, who sports the title of “Chief Representative to the European Institutions”, declared that “Huawei has been respecting all applicable laws and regulations. Now Huawei is becoming the victim of the bullying by the US administration. This is not just an attack against Huawei. It is an attack on the liberal, rules-based order.” When a tool of a regime that bans freedom of expression and holds minorities in internment camps utters the word “liberal” and the phrase “rules-based order” you know it’s time to reach for a non-Huawei phone.

Huawei


Will Huawei get its masters to ban the iPhone?

Tuesday, 21 May, 2019

US companies are now banned from supplying Huawei with components, which covers both software and the chips to go into its network equipment and phones. This is serious because Huawei is on track to become the largest supplier of smartphones in the world by volume. And we’re not talking low-end here anymore. Thirty percent of smartphones sold in Europe in Q1 this year were Huawei. Despite the argy-bargy with Washington, Huawei can still use Android because it’s open source, but it might have to do without Google’s layer of popular applications, depending on the politics of the dispute. For now, Huawei hasn’t revealed its hand, but it must have a Plan B for its own app store, and because it’s a front corporation for the Communist Party, it may get its masters to ban the sale of iPhones in China. We haven’t heard the end of this.

Huawei


Huawei: China’s 5G Fifth Column

Saturday, 12 January, 2019

“He spoke great Polish. He was a really well-known Chinese guy in Poland and was always around.” The headline on the Wall Street Journal article is, “Chinese Huawei Executive Is Charged With Espionage in Poland.” Snippet:

“For years, Washington has labeled Huawei a national security threat, saying it could be forced by China to use its knowledge of the telecommunications equipment it sells around the world to tap into, or disable, foreign communications networks. Huawei has denied that forcefully through the years. Part of its defense has been that it hadn’t been implicated in overseas spying allegations.

Officers of Poland’s counterintelligence agency this week searched the local Huawei office, leaving with documents and electronic data, as well as the home of the Chinese national, said Stanislaw Zaryn, a spokesman for Poland’s security coordination office. The Chinese individual wasn’t named, but was identified by Polish state television as a graduate of one of China’s top intelligence schools, as well as a former employee of the Chinese consulate in the port city of Gdansk.

People familiar with the matter identified him as Weijing Wang. He is known in Poland as Stanislaw Wang, according to these people and a public LinkedIn page that matches his biographical details.

A person who knew Mr. Wang described him as a well-known figure in local business circles, often spotted at events sponsored by Huawei in Poland. ‘He spoke great Polish,’ this person said. ‘He was a really well-known Chinese guy in Poland and was always around.'”

China is determined to destroy the West. It’s time to close the door on its stalking horses, starting with Huawei.

 ChiSpy


Samsung up in smoke; HTC and Huawei burned

Tuesday, 11 October, 2016 0 Comments

In business schools all over the world, the Samsung Galaxy Note7 case study is guaranteed to be popular. Case studies about the fall of video-rental companies or the rise of low-cost airlines are interesting in their own way, but because so many business students have a smartphone made in Asia, this one is, like, personal.

Fire Today’s press release headline is worthy of study: “Samsung Will Ask All Global Partners to Stop Sales and Exchanges of Galaxy Note7 While Further Investigation Takes Place.” One can almost sense the trust people have in Samsung’s products going up in smoke as that was being typed, and the jokes have started: “Galaxy Note 7 — the smartphone that doubles as a lighter.”

It’s the cover-up that gets you, they say, and it seems all the initial work Samsung did to undo the Note 7 damage has been undone by its ongoing denial that the phone was still dangerous. With its aggressive, can-do culture, this world leader in electronics could not imagine making a disastrous safety mistake… Twice!

Samsung’s nightmare does not automatically mean good news for HTC, however. Google has picked the Taiwanese electronics company to assemble its new Pixel smartphone, but by becoming for Google what Foxconn is to Apple, HTC has lost status. “HTC, You Loser” wrote Bloomberg technology columnist Tim Culpan: “After spending years building its design and engineering chops, HTC has been demoted to water boy. Supplying Google with smartphones isn’t a victory — it’s an embarrassing end to HTC’s decade-long campaign to break out of that contract-manufacturing business and stand on its own two feet.”

The catastrophe at Samsung and the degrading of HTC should work in favour of Huawei Technologies, the Chinese telecommunications giant, but David Ruddock of Android Police pours cold water on that one:

“Google began talks with Huawei to produce its 2016 smartphone portfolio. Google, though, set a hard rule for the partnership: Huawei would be relegated to a manufacturing role, producing phones with Google branding. The Huawei logo and name would be featured nowhere on the devices’ exteriors or in their marketing… According to our source, word spread inside Huawei quickly that global CEO Richard Yu himself ended negotiations with Google right then and there.”

Meanwhile, Apple has brought forward its earnings report for the fourth fiscal quarter (third calendar quarter) of 2016. “Due to a scheduling conflict, Apple’s conference call to discuss fourth fiscal quarter results has been moved to Tuesday, October 25,” the company announced yesterday. It’s not clear what the conflict is, but there’s no smoke without fire. Also yesterday, Apple’s share price bounced 1.75 percent, hitting an intraday high of $116.75, the highest level since 10 December 2015.