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Tag: Los Angeles

Dawes: The Laurel Canyon sound continued

Saturday, 14 July, 2018

In Laurel Canyon by Michael Walker, which was published in 2006, the author described the eponymous place high in the Hollywood Hills as “the slightly seedy, camp-like neighborhood of serpentine one-lane roads, precipitous hills, fragrant eucalyptus trees, and softly crumbling bungalows set down improbably in the middle of Los Angeles.” There, in 1968, something magical happened when Joni Mitchell was in the ‘hood: “So it was that Nash, Stills, and Crosby sat in Mitchell’s living room on Lookout Mountain, in the heart of Laurel Canyon, in the epicenter of L.A.’s nascent rock music industry, and for the first time, began to sing together.”

It’s been said that the Los Angles rock band Dawes are the continuation of the Laurel Canyon sound by new means. The members are Wylie Gelber, Lee Pardini and the brothers Taylor and Griffin Goldsmith. Living in the Future is the first song on their new album, Passwords, which was released last month.

Note: Passwords has been described as an album “for and about the modern age: the relationships that fill it, the politics that divide it, and the small victories and big losses that give it shape.” Dawes are marketing the album with campaign that encourages fans to search for “passwords” posted across the internet. Once a password is found, it can be entered on the band’s site where each part of the password represents a musical note. When entered correctly, these musical notes play bits from Dawes songs and unlock exclusive content, including a Spotify playlist curated by Griffin Goldsmith.


Barcelona for the AIR

Saturday, 7 October, 2017 0 Comments

Vincent Laforet is a French-American director and photographer and one of the most influential people working in contemporary photography and film today. His AIR project is a collection of high-altitude aerial photographs taken over 10 of the world’s most iconic cities: Barcelona, Berlin, Chicago, Las Vegas, London, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, San Francisco and Sydney. This is Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, with its arrays of perfectly honeycomb-like blocks.

Barcelona


Mesmerising Kilauea

Saturday, 11 February, 2017 0 Comments

The “the fire hose” lava flow continues to gush from Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano and pour into the ocean Kamokuna. As the “Lava viewing guide for the Big Island” puts it, “Hawaii wouldn’t exist if it were not for the continuous volcanic activity that created all the islands in the state.” Going with this flow, Givot Media, a creative agency based in Los Angeles, made the spellbinding “Hawaii — The Pace of Transformation.”


Werner Herzog’s Reveries Of The Connected World

Thursday, 21 January, 2016 0 Comments

Born in Munich in 1942, amid falling Allied bombs, Werner Stipetić was taken for safety by his mother to the remote Bavarian village of Sachrang in the Alps. They moved back to Munich in 1954 and Werner adopted his absconded father’s surname Herzog (German for “duke”), which he felt sounded more impressive for a would-be filmmaker.

Today, Werner Herzog is considered one of the great figures of the New German Cinema, along with Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Wim Wenders, Volker Schlöndorff and Margarethe von Trotta. In 1996, he moved to Los Angeles, where he lives with the photographer Elena Pisetski, now Lena Herzog.

At this year’s Sundance Film Festival, which kicks off today beneath the snow-capped mountains of Park City in Utah, Herzog’s latest work, Lo And Behold: Reveries of the Connected World, will be premeiered.

Blurb: “Society depends on the Internet for nearly everything but rarely do we step back and recognize its endless intricacies and unsettling omnipotence. From the brilliant mind of Werner Herzog comes his newest vehicle for exploration, a playful yet chilling examination of our rapidly interconnecting online lives.

Herzog documents a treasure trove of interviews of strange and beguiling individuals — ranging from Internet pioneers to victims of wireless radiation, whose anecdotes and reflections weave together a complex portrait of our brave new world. Herzog describes the Internet as ‘one of the biggest revolutions we as humans are experiencing,’ and yet he tempers this enthusiasm with horror stories from victims of online harassment and Internet addiction.

For all of its detailed analysis, this documentary also wrestles with profound and intangible questions regarding the Internet’s future. Will it dream, as humans do, of its own existence? Can it discover the fundamentals of morality, or perhaps one day understand the meaning of love? Or will it soon cause us — if it hasn’t already — more harm than good?”


Droning For Good above LA

Saturday, 22 August, 2015 0 Comments

“I continue to be awe struck by how much of this vast city I have partially or completely overlooked before undertaking this video,” says videographer Ian Wood about his aerial exploration of downtown Los Angeles. Explaining the “Droning For Good” philosophy, he says: “With all the controversy about drones, it’s important to remember that they can be (and often are) used responsibly. As with many emerging technologies, the laws struggle to keep up and we must employ a common sense approach to their use that is respectful to community, safety and the law.”

By the way, here’s a map of the locations seen in the clip and the music is If You Ain’t Never Had The Blues by Boo Boo Davis.


Hasta Cuando? Venezuela

Saturday, 27 June, 2015 0 Comments

Reuters: “One hundred and twenty policemen have been murdered so far this year in Venezuela, one of the world’s most violent countries, a local watchdog said on Friday.” Appalled by the crime and corruption now gripping her homeland, the Venezuelan pianist and composer Gabriela Montero is using her music to challenge the propaganda of the Chávez/Maduro regimes and question the ideology that has bankrupted the country.

Born in 1970 in Caracas, Gabriela Montero now lives in Los Angeles. In Una improvisación sobre la violencia en Venezuela, she asks: How Long More?


Come all ye Bob

Tuesday, 10 February, 2015 0 Comments

“Come all ye loyal heroes and listen unto me / Don’t hire with any farmer till you know what your work will be.” So begins The Rocks of Bawn, a 19th-century Irish ballad about the exploitation of rural labour. Migrants from the British Isles took this song form, with its appeal to attention, across the Atlantic and it found an audience in the New World. When Bob Dylan was honoured as the 2015 MusiCares Person of the Year last Friday night in Los Angeles, he recalled in his acceptance speech the role these songs played in his own musical development. Snippet:

“I sang a lot of ‘come all you’ songs. There’s plenty of them. There’s way too many to be counted. ‘Come along boys and listen to my tale / Tell you of my trouble on the old Chisholm Trail.’ Or, ‘Come all ye good people, listen while I tell / the fate of Floyd Collins a lad we all know well / The fate of Floyd Collins, a lad we all know well.'”

If you sung all these ‘come all ye’ songs all the time, you’d be writing, ‘Come gather ’round people where ever you roam, admit that the waters around you have grown / Accept that soon you’ll be drenched to the bone / If your time to you is worth saving / And you better start swimming or you’ll sink like a stone / The times they are a-changing.'”


The Morning Becomes Spiritual with Spain

Saturday, 8 March, 2014 0 Comments

Back in 1993 in Los Angeles, Josh Haden formed a band and called it Spain. Their debut album, The Blue Moods of Spain, was released in 1995, and from it, their song Spiritual was covered by Johnny Cash on his Unchained album. Talking of things spiritual, Out Among the Stars, a posthumous studio album from Johnny Cash, will be released on March 25.

The Morning Becomes Eclectic Session, a set of seven Spain classics, was recorded live at KCRW radio station in Santa Monica, California, and from it, here is Spiritual.


New fangled folk by Local Natives

Saturday, 23 February, 2013 0 Comments

In attempting to come up with a fitting definition for the sound created by the Los Angeles-based Local Natives, the independent media group, Clash Music, described their style as “psych folk” and “new fangled folk.” Writing about the band’s new album, Pitchfork, had this to say: “With Hummingbird, Local Natives have made a thoughtful, lovely album with small gestures that provide great rewards.” The mother of lead vocalist Kelcey Ayer died last summer and he addresses her movingly in the album’s penultimate song, Colombia: “If you never felt all of my love/ I pray now you do.”


Lana Del Rey: from acclaim to backlash in 15 minutes

Saturday, 28 January, 2012

Her pout has been described as “a model for the entire plastic surgery industry of greater Los Angeles”. And that’s only one example of the kind of hate that’s now unloading on poor, rich, talented, lovely Lana Del Rey since she released her brand new album yesterday. What particularly upsets the Occupy class is that Lana is as privileged financially as she is genetically. You see, dad’s a millionaire whose money comes from one of the modern wonders of capitalism: web domain investing. Worst of all, though, for our puritanical champions of purity and authenticity, Lana’s real name is Lizzy Grant. This “revelation” is available to all on Wikipedia.