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Tag: Margaret Thatcher

Mario Vargas Llosa: Thatcher’s revolution

Wednesday, 7 March, 2018 0 Comments

“Mario Vargas Llosa is in good form.” That’s a good sentence. And it’s used to introduce readers of EL PAÍS SEMANAL to the Peruvian Nobel Laureate, whose latest book, La llamada de la tribu (The Call of the Tribe), has just been published. It’s an argument in favour of liberal thought and the writer makes his case by quoting seven authors: Adam Smith, José Ortega y Gasset, Friedrich von Hayek, Karl Popper, Raymond Aron, Isaiah Berlin and Jean-François Revel.

This being the eve of International Women’s Day, the sisterhood will be quick to point out the absence of women in that list but it should be noted that the interviewer here is Maite Rico and a woman, Margaret Thatcher, had a major influence on the political evolution of Mario Vargas Llosa. Snippet:

Q. The picture you paint of Margaret Thatcher as a brave, cultured woman of deep liberal convictions, contrasts starkly with the image we have of her.

A. That’s an absolutely unjust caricature. When I arrived in England, it was a decadent country — a country with freedom but whose mettle was being snuffed out gradually by the Labour Party’s economic nationalism. Margaret Thatcher’s revolution woke Britain up. They were tough times; finishing with the sinecure of the trade unions, creating a competent free-market society, and defending democracy with conviction while facing up to socialism, China, the USSR — the cruelest dictatorships in history. They were decisive years for me because I started to read Hayek and Popper, both authors quoted by Thatcher. She said that The Open Society and Its Enemies would be a crucial book for the 20th Century. The contribution of Thatcher and Ronald Reagan to the culture of freedom, finishing with the Soviet Union —the biggest challenge democratic culture had ever had — is a reality that is unfortunately portrayed in a media influenced by a campaign from the left whose achievements are few.

When he’s right, he’s right. And he’s right.

Mario Vargas Llosa


#Brexit: Alan Posener plays the German card

Monday, 20 June, 2016 0 Comments

“Brexit would be irresponsible. The EU — and liberal Germans EU — need Britain in order to help contain a Germany that may have little to do with the ‘new Germany’ I saw celebrating falling borders not quite a decade ago.” So says the Anglo-German journalist Alan Posener, who writes about politics and society for Die Welt, which describes itself as “liberal cosmopolitan” but is generally labelled as conservative in the German media spectrum. In a new twist of the so-called Project Fear meme, Posener warns that “German nationalism can only be contained by a united Europe” in the Guardian today. To support his case, he cites Margaret Thatcher liberally:

“By its very nature, Germany is a destabilising, rather than a stabilising force in Europe,” Thatcher wrote in her memoirs, explaining why she had tried to get Mikhail Gorbachev to oppose German reunification. She also met with leading historians in order to understand the German “national character”. According to the memorandum of the meeting, this included “angst, aggressiveness, assertiveness, bullying, egotism, inferiority complexes and sentimentality”.

Note: Poesner is to be thanked for his translation of “abendländisch,” a word that’s tossed around a lot by the German talking class. It is, says Posener, “a term which is hard to translate, but basically means anti-Anglo-Saxon.”

Demanding that Britain save Germany from itself and that Britain save Europe from Germany is a big ask of the voters, but Posener seems convinced that unless they put a cross next to “Remain an member of the European Union” on Thursday, “Germany could become a danger to itself, Europe and the west.”

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Margaret Thatcher predicted Yanis Varoufakis

Tuesday, 30 June, 2015 0 Comments

It is fashionable for liberal/leftist elites, including feminists, to hate Margaret Thatcher. She was all that they are not and because she refused to play the glass-ceiling game, they despised her. The most obvious recent example of their rage is The Assassination Of Margaret Thatcher by Hilary Mantel, which was published to much acclaim last year. Gleefully, the BBC adapted it for radio.

What they cannot deny, however, is that Margaret Thatcher understood the nightmare potential of the euro and she saved Great Britain from getting entangled in its snares by voicing her concerns. This led to the “five tests” devised, allegedly in the back of a taxi, by Gordon Brown and Ed Balls in 1997 that kept the UK out of the euro for good. In The Path To Power (1995), Mrs Thatcher revealed that she had been under constant pressure since 1990 to accept the proposed EMU (Economic and Monetary Union). She wanted no part of it; she foresaw the inflation and competitiveness dangers, she knew her history and she understood human nature. Referring to EMU, she said:

“Under this, Germany and France would end up paying all the regional subventions which the poorer countries would insist upon if they were going to lose their ability to compete on the basis of a currency that reflected their economic performance. I also thought that the Germans’ anxiety about the weakening of their anti-inflation policies, entailed by moves towards a single currency and away from the Deutschmark, could be exploited in negotiations.”

Sure enough, Germany will not accept greater inflation, poorer countries are insisting on bailouts and Yanis Varoufakis knows a thing or two about exploiting his counterparts in negotiations. Those dealing with the mess now might benefit from studying this snippet from a lecture Margaret Thatcher gave at Hillsdale College in 1994:

“Sir Edward Gibbon (1737-1794), author of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, wrote tellingly of the collapse of Athens, which was the birthplace of democracy. He judged that, in the end, more than they wanted freedom, the Athenians wanted security. Yet they lost everything — security, comfort, and freedom. This was because they wanted not to give to society, but for society to give to them. The freedom they were seeking was freedom from responsibility. It is no wonder, then, that they ceased to be free.”

Margaret Thatcher


A one-woman revolution

Sunday, 6 April, 2014 0 Comments

“A year ago this coming Tuesday, I was travelling to London on a train, correcting the proofs of my biography of Margaret Thatcher. As we reached Charing Cross, I signed off the last page of the book (which concerns victory in the Falklands war). When I got off the train, I discovered she had died.” […]

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In Bruges

Wednesday, 17 April, 2013 0 Comments

On 20 September 1988, Margaret Thatcher delivered her famous Bruges speech. The venue was the College of Europe, the Oxbridge, the Harvard and the MIT of the European Union. It produces the officer class of the “European project” and most graduates go on to work in the European Commission, Parliament, Central Bank or the Court of Justice.

In Bruges, Mrs Thatcher spoke to those who religiously believe that federalism is the European raison d’être. To their horror, she sang the praises of national sovereignty. “The European Community is one manifestation of that European identity, but it is not the only one. We must never forget that east of the Iron Curtain, people who once enjoyed a full share of European culture, freedom and identity have been cut off from their roots. We shall always look on Warsaw, Prague and Budapest as great European cities.”

Margaret Thatcher called out the federalists in Bruges and accused them of plotting the end of the nation state in Europe. In doing to, she placed Europe at the heart of British politics and the aftershocks continue to this day. That fact that her successor as leader of the Tory Party, David Cameron, has pledged an in/out referendum on Europe is something she could not have dreamed of that night in Bruges.


No. No. No.

Tuesday, 9 April, 2013 0 Comments

In her two autobiographies, The Downing Street Years and The Path To Power, the late British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher made clear that she wanted the UK to have no part of EMU (Economic and Monetary Union) in the form of what became the euro currency. With uncanny prescience, she foresaw that Germany would baulk at the inexorable need for greater inflation and that the weaker countries would inescapably become uncompetitive and need bailouts.

“I said that it was psychologically wrong to put ourselves in a frame of mind in which we accepted the inevitability of moves towards EMU rather than attacking the whole concept. We had arguments which might persuade both the Germans — who would be worried about the weakening of anti-inflation policies — and the poorer countries — who must be told they would not be bailed out of the consequences of a single currency, which would therefore devastate their inefficient economies.” The Downing Street Years (1993)

And so it has come to pass. After Greece, Ireland, Portugal and Cyprus have had to be bailed out, and now Slovenia is wobbling into parlous territory. If only the hotheads had listened to Mrs Thatcher 23 years ago, much of the current suffering could have been avoided.

“It will be recalled that when John Major and I had been discussing the tactics required to resist pressure towards economic and monetary union in the summer of 1990, I had been quite prepared for the other eleven Governments to negotiate a separate treaty for Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). Under this, Germany and France would finish up paying all the regional subventions which the poorer countries would insist upon if they were going to lose their ability to compete on the basis of a currency that reflected their economic performance.” The Path To Power (1995)

As it’s turned out, Germany, not France, is paying for the poorer countries in the form of a new wave of anti-German feeling swelling across Europe. The things that vex stony sleep to nightmare are many, as the poet said.


Margaret Thatcher RIP

Monday, 8 April, 2013 0 Comments

“For my part, I favour an approach to statecraft that embraces principles, as long as it is not stifled by them; and I prefer such principles to be accompanied by steel along with good intentions.” Margaret Thatcher (13 October 1925 — 8 April 2013)

“Socialists cry ‘Power to the people’, and raise the clenched fist as they say it. We all know what they really mean—power over people, power to the State.”


The aphrodisiac of power

Thursday, 30 August, 2012

In 1975, when Margaret Thatcher was bidding for the leadership of the Conservative Party, the Labour Party health secretary, Barbara Castle, was prompted to commit the following observation to her diary:

“The papers are full of Margaret Thatcher. She has leant herself with grace and charm to every piece of photographer’s gimmickry, but don’t we all when the prize is big enough? What interests me is how blooming she looks — she has never been prettier. I am interested because I understand the phenomenon. She may have been up late on the Finance Bill Committee; she is beset by enemies and has to watch every gesture and word. But she sails through it all looking her best. I understand why. She is in love: in love with power, success — and with herself. She looks as I looked when Harold [Wilson] made me Minister of Transport. If we have to have Tories, good luck to her!”

The aura of attractiveness bestowed on mere mortals by the aphrodisiac of power can now be seen in the person of Paul Ryan, who looks like a young John F. Kennedy, but without the patina of privilege.


The Iron Lady on all channels

Monday, 16 January, 2012

Meryl Streep has won the Golden Globe for Best Actress for her role as Margaret Thatcher in Phyllida Lloyd’s The Iron Lady. By all accounts, her performance is nothing short of extraordinary, and she’s now the favourite to win at next month’s Oscars (nominations will be announced on 24 January). How talented is Streep? In […]

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