Tag: Munich

A meshugener in the Haus der Kunst

Sunday, 14 April, 2013 0 Comments

When the Nazis decided to erect a monument, one that would glorify the concept of art as propaganda and venerate their Aryan supremacist ideology, they chose Munich, the “Capital of the Movement”, as the location. The Haus der Kunst (House of Art) “) at Prinzregentenstrasse 1 opened on 18 July 1937 with the Große Deutsche […]

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Giovanni Trapattoni kicks off our Italian week

Monday, 18 February, 2013 0 Comments

Italy is very much in the news these days. For instance, there’s a critical general election next weekend and that will be followed by the papal conclave in Rome as a result of the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. True to form, these major events have been preceded by the arrest of the former head of the country’s third largest bank for alleged fraud and bribery, and the arrest of the chairman of the air defense group Finmeccanica over his alleged involvement in a corruption scandal.

Life goes on, however, and that symbol of a kinder, gentler Italy, Giovanni Trapattoni, will today preside over the opening a new shopping mall in Munich. Trap, as fans call him, managed local team Bayern Munich for two seasons and he remains very popular in the Bavarian capital because of his style, charm and cryptic use of German. The expression “Ich habe fertig!” (“I’m done!”) is a legendary Trapattonism that owes its linguistic fame to his usage of the verb habe (have) instead of bin (am) during an emotional press conference and has since become part of spoken German.

Fertig!

Beneath the jolly exterior, beats a canny heart and Trapattoni struck a one of the century’s best deals in 2008 when he convinced the Football Association of Ireland to appoint him as manager of the national squad on a munificent salary of €2 million a year, plus €750,000 a year for his backroom team. It was this kind of profligacy that saw Ireland seek an EU bailout in 2010 and in a selfless gesture of burden-sharing a year later, Trapattoni agreed to have his pay cut to €1 million per annum. Odd jobs like opening a shopping mall in prosperous Munich helps Trap to cope with that sharp drop in income.

Whilst in Munich, the devout Catholic Giovanni Trapattoni will, no doubt, find time to pray for the Bavarian Pope, Benedetto, who is the subject of tomorrow’s post here.


The Architecture of Density

Wednesday, 2 January, 2013 0 Comments

The urban landscapes captured my Munich photographer Michael Wolf look like collages of pixels created by graphic designers who cut their teeth on Lego. But they are very real buildings in today’s megacities, especially Hong Kong. Although these are residential silos, what makes Wolf’s images so perturbing is the almost complete absence of human inhabitants. But in many of Asia’s great cities, the concept of space, both private and public, is dramatically different to that which is considered “normal” in the West.

Hong Kong living


Spare a thought for Spain this Christmas

Friday, 21 December, 2012 0 Comments

The much-criticized, scandal-prone BBC Newsnight does a lot to salvage its tattered reputation in this excellent documentary by Paul Mason, the programme’s economics editor. From dictatorship to democracy, from construction boom to cataclysmic bust, the rise and fall of Spain is an epic story of hubris, greed, madness and suffering.

What’s the end game? Read Euro Negative Yield Hits Jobless Spaniard to Munich Fund Manager by Ben Sills and Oliver Suess of Bloomberg.


Sylvan sofa

Sunday, 21 October, 2012

Thous still unravish’d bride of quietness, Thou foster-child of Silence and slow Time, Sylvan historian, who canst thus express A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme: What leaf-fringed legend haunts about thy shape Of deities or mortals, or of both, In Tempe or the dales of Arcady? Ode on a Grecian Urn John Keats […]

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Man tuba

Sunday, 7 October, 2012

Tuba is Latin for trumpet or horn. The tuba is generally constructed of brass, which is either unfinished, lacquered or electro-plated with nickel, gold or silver. A person who plays the tuba is known as a tubaist or tubist

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In the napcab at the aerotropolis

Thursday, 20 September, 2012

Exhausted from crossing time zones? One hour in a napcab at Munich Airport costs €15 by day €10 at night. Developed by a Technische Universität München start up, the cabins contain a bed, a desk and, critically for travellers in need of sleep, free internet access.

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The Games of the XX Olympiad in Munich and their victims

Sunday, 26 August, 2012

On this day in 1972, the Games of the XX Olympiad began in Munich and continued until 10 September. At 4:30am on the morning of 5 September, a group of Palestinian terrorists broke into the Olympic Village and entered two apartments being used by the Israeli team at 31 Connollystraße. The memorial plaque on the […]

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The depraved architects of death

Wednesday, 25 July, 2012

Architecture in Uniform: Designing and Building for the Second World War by the French architectural historian and architect Jean-Louis Cohen establishes “one big, awful, inescapable truth”, writes Martin Filler in the New York Review of Books. According to Filler: “the full potential of twentieth-century architecture, engineering, and design was realized not in the social-welfare and […]

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We verb / We noun

Sunday, 3 June, 2012

move (verb) to change the place or position of something. “Egypt’s prosecutor general ordered President Hosni Mubarak to be moved to a military prison on the outskirts of Cairo.” Reuters sale (noun) the transfer of ownership of something from one person to another for a price. “Romney discloses sale of stocks in dozens of companies […]

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Marie Louise O’Murphy, mistress, survivor

Tuesday, 29 May, 2012

A holiday Monday in Munich and a visit to the Alte Pinakothek art musuem. There, in the upper floor gallery reclines Marie Louise O’Murphy, once mistress of Louis XV of France. Born in 1737 in Rouen to Marguerite Igny and Daniel O’Murphy de Boisfaily, an Irish soldier who had taken up shoemaking, she was the […]

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