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Tag: music

Morrissey Spent the Day in Bed

Sunday, 19 November, 2017 0 Comments

Morrissey began the Twitter phase of his career two months ago. On 18 September, at 10.39 pm, he tweeted “Spent the Day in Bed.” Spent the Day in Bed is also the title of the first single from his new album Low In High School. In recent years, Moz has taken to saying things that people don’t want to hear and he’s not for turning now.

“Spent the day in bed
Very happy I did, yes
I spent the day in bed
As the workers stay enslaved
I spent the day in bed
I’m not my type, but
I love my bed
And I recommend that you

Stop watching the news!
Because the news contrives to frighten you
To make you feel small and alone
To make you feel that your mind isn’t your own.”


Kick started

Friday, 3 November, 2017 0 Comments

Congratulations to Hoodman Blind on exceeding their Kickstarter funding goal for the recording, mixing and mastering the band’s debut EP. Drive on!

Hoodman Blind


Peadar O’Loughlin, RIP

Tuesday, 24 October, 2017 1 Comment

Born in the parish of Kilmaley in County Clare on 6 November 1929, Peadar O’Loughlin was a traditional musician’s musician. He happily shared his tunes with a younger generation, typified by Ronan Browne and Maeve Donnelly, eager to learn a style that was sparsely ornamented but powerfully rhythmic, and his playing, on fiddle, flute and pipes, reflected a gentle, generous personality that will be very much missed.


Ybor City

Sunday, 8 October, 2017 0 Comments

Those initial consonants, y and b, make Ybor sound fictional, even science fictional, and there is a created history behind this American city’s origins, but the place is real and Jason Isbell name-checks it in Traveling Alone:

“I quit talking to myself
And listening to the radio a long, long time ago
Damn near strangled by my appetite
In Ybor City on a Friday night
Couldn’t even stand upright
So high, the street girls wouldn’t take my pay
She said come see me on a better day, she just danced away.”

Note: Ybor City is a historic neighbourhood in Tampa, Florida, northeast of downtown. It was founded in the 1880s by Vicente Martinez-Ybor and other cigar manufacturers and became home to thousands of immigrants, mainly from Cuba, Spain and Italy. Today, the residents are mostly creative migrants from Miami, Atlanta and New York.


Wind & Rain

Saturday, 16 September, 2017 0 Comments

The 184th Oktoberfest begins in Munich today and it will run until 3 October. Normally, it’s an occasion for Kaiserwetter (glorious, sunny weather) but it’s kicking off this year with wind and rain. That’s ideal weather, though, for rugby and, for the first time ever, Oktoberfest will feature a world-class “sevens” rugby tournament, with teams from Fiji, South Africa, England, France, Ireland, Australia and Germany.

Wind and rain are central motifs in the ballad performed here by the superbly talented Hanz Araki, who combines his Japanese and Irish heritages in an American mix that makes for a refreshing interpretation of traditional music.


The young Elvis

Sunday, 13 August, 2017 0 Comments

On Thursday, the world will mark the 40th anniversary of the death of Elvis Presley, “the King”. To get us ready for this memorable occasion, Vintage Everyday has assembled “20 Rare and Fascinating Vintage Photos of Elvis Presley As a Child and Teenager from the 1930s and ’40s.” They offer a glimpse of life in Tupelo, Mississippi, before the Presley family relocated to Memphis, Tennessee. It was there, in July 1954, in the offices of Sun Records, that Elvis recorded a blues song by Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup, That’s All Right. The rest is rock ‘n roll.

Gladys, Elvis and Vernon Presley, 1937.


Fionn Regan meets Thomas Moore in Wicklow

Saturday, 15 July, 2017 0 Comments

Inspired by a visit to the Vale of Avoca in County Wicklow some 200 years ago, the bard Thomas Moore wrote a song called The Meeting of the Waters. Snippet:

“Sweet vale of Avoca! How calm could I rest
In thy bosom of shade, with the friends I love best
Where the storms that we feel in this cold world should cease
And our hearts, like thy waters, be mingled in peace.”

The Irish singer-songwriter Fionn Regan was born and raised in Wicklow and he released his debut album, The End of History, in 2006. Now, more than a decade later, he’s back with The Meetings of the Waters and the video is enhanced with the sculpted features of the actor Cillian Murphy of Peaky Blinders fame.


Two Corants for Lyra Viol by Alfonso

Saturday, 1 July, 2017 0 Comments

On the face of it, a blog entry with the title “Two Corants for Lyra Viol by Alfonso” has a touch of the perplexing about it. What’s a “corant”, and why two of them? And then there’s the “lyra viol”. Not just a viol, mind you, but a lyra viol. Topping if all of, we have “Alfonso”. If people had to pick an Alfonso, most would opt for Alfonso Cuarón, the film director, whose works include Children of Men and Gravity. In this case, however, we’re talking about Alfonso Fontanelli (1557 – 1622).

Alfonso Fontanelli was an Italian composer, diplomat and courtier. He was one of the earliest composers in the seconda pratica style during the transition to the Baroque era but his career was interrupted in November 1601, when he discovered that his wife had been having an affair. He murdered her lover, but spared her life, unlike his musical acquaintance Gesualdo who, in similar circumstances murdered both his wife and her lover. As punishment for the crime, Alfonso was stripped of all his possessions. Still, he found refuge in the opulent Roman household of Cardinal Alessandro d’Este, and was thus saved from indignity. Alfonso Fontanelli became a priest in 1621, and died in early 1622 from an insect bite while in the Oratorio della Chiesa.

The lyra viol is a small bass viol, used primarily in the 17th century, while a corant was a type of dance popular in the late Renaissance and Baroque era.

Bringing it all together now: The Irish viola de gamba player, Liam Byrne, is part of the Icelandic collective Bedroom Community and he features with violist Nadia Sirota on Tessellatum, their upcoming album and film. That’s all a long way from the Renaissance world of Alfonso Fontanelli, but everything’s connected.


Eliza Carthy & The Wayward Band

Sunday, 25 June, 2017 0 Comments

They’ll be performing with brass, fiddles and bravura in St Canice’s Cathedral on Wednesday 16 August at 8pm as part of this year’s Kilkenny Arts Festival. Hug You Like A Mountain features Teddy Thompson, the son of musicians Richard and Linda Thompson, while Eliza Carthy is the daughter of musicians Martin Carthy and Norma Waterson. It doesn’t get more blue-blooded than this alliance of English folk-rock.


Vespertines

Sunday, 18 June, 2017 0 Comments

The album title is a statement in itself: Before a New Harbour Can Be Built, Difficult Things Must Be Worked Out. The group is The Vespertine Quintet and the tracks came together during a West Cork winter punctuated by gigs in De Barra’s Bar in Clonakilty.

A central figure in the quintet’s work is Ólafur Arnalds, a multi-instrumentalist from Iceland, who mixes strings and piano with loops and beats from the ambient and electronic genres. Estonia’s Arvo Pärt is in the mix as is the Irish singer-songwriter Adrian Crowley and the Swedish alto Camilla Griehsel. The outcome is a ten-track assortment of neo-classical sounds, part Pärt, part Purcell, portions of Arnalds and echoes of Benjamin Britten.


Peter Broderick in the Cave

Thursday, 1 June, 2017 0 Comments

He was born in Maine but raised mostly in Oregon. Last year, Peter Broderick married the folk musician Brigid Mae Power and they currently live in Ireland. On 7 July, he’ll be performing in Mitchelstown Cave along with the Irish/ Sierra Leonean musician Loah. “My aim is to approach music with a sense of openness and wonder, and to never be tied down to any one particular style,” says Broderick. As the organizers point out: “The Cave is a half mile walk underground after a steep incline to the performance space. The temperature in the Cave is 12 degrees. Please wear flat shoes and bring a coat.”