Tag: Newsweek

Newsweek has gone to the dogs

Friday, 22 January, 2016 0 Comments

One expects certain things from the Daily Mail site. Its “sidebar of shame,” a strip of thumbnail photos down the right side, which specializes in breasts and buttocks, sets the standard. It’s not surprising then that the Daily Mail would title a story “Indian boy, seven, is forced to marry a DOG to ward off evil spirits after his horoscope suggests his first wife will die young.” That headline alone contains more jaw-droppers than a week’s worth of the Telegraph, the Guardian and Newsweek combined.

Background: With Newsweek, one has, or had, different expectations. Founded in 1933 in New York City, Newsweek was one of America’s “big three” weekly news magazines, along with Time and U.S.News & World Report. It covered news, politics, business, entertainment, science, religion, sports and the arts with style and a liberal verve and had a circulation of 3.3 million copies in its heyday. But that was then. In 2010 , the Washington Post Company, its then owner, sold the magazine to 92-year-old audio pioneer Sidney Harman for $1.00. Newsweek merged with The Daily Beast website later that year and under the guiding hand of Tina Brown, the Beast’s editor-in-chief, it ceased print publication with the 31 December 2012 issue.

Foreground: But there was life in Lazarus and IBT Media announced it had acquired the title in 2013 and it relaunched a print edition of Newsweek on 7 March 2014. For those unfamiliar with the media scene, IBT Media is connected to the Korean pastor David Jang, who is not without controversy.

All that brings us back to dogs. “I ATTENDED A SWANKY WEDDING FOR INSTAGRAM-FAMOUS DOGS” is a recent headline in the new Newsweek. Zach Schonfeld’s article contains the following gem:

The dogwalker asked who I work for.

“Man, Newsweek is covering this?” he asked in disbelief. “Our society is so fucked, man. We’re gonna look back years later and be like, ‘Dog weddings? That was the end.'”

Indeed.


Writing on the wall: Newsweek, Forbes, New York

Monday, 2 December, 2013 0 Comments

The Gladwellian tipping point for the US magazine industry arrived in 2010, when Newsweek was sold for $1. A doomed merger with The Daily Beast followed, and then came the finale last year when Newsweek ceased print publication. More grim news arrived last month when the publisher of Forbes magazine hired Deutsche Bank AG to examine a sale. “While the company prospered during the dot-com boom, the subsequent bust in 2000 and migration of advertising from print to online sites slammed its finances,” reported Bloomberg.

NY Mag And now New York magazine is following suit. Starting in March, it will abandon its weekly publication schedule and appear 26 times a year instead. Why? Because print advertising revenue is sinking like a stone. “So far this year, the magazine is down 9.2 percent in ad pages compared with the same period last year, which was miserable as well,” writes David Carr in today’s New York Times. And this is happening at a time when its digital revenues have been growing at 15 percent year-over-year. Indeed, in 2014, its digital ad take will outdo print ad revenues.

Carr says that by going bi-monthly as a print magazine, New York will save some $3.5 million, which will then be invested on the digital side and 15 people will be hired to strengthen online content and sales. As regards the non-digital side of things, the publishers hope it will become “a more visual, more deliberative version of the print magazine will make it more hospitable to luxury and fashion.” In other words, a Stateside clone of Intelligent Life.

It may be possible for New York, Forbes and other magazines to reinvent themselves in this time of publishing tumult, but it would be unwise to bet on their success. Their lingering, notes David Carr, grimly, “underscores the dreary economics of print and its diminishing role in a future that’s already here.” That future has a name. And it’s called Buzzfeed.


A terrible year for journalism is ending badly

Friday, 7 December, 2012 1 Comment

From the New York Post, which has abandoned ethics, to Newsweek, which is laying off staff, the journalism landscape is littered with bad news. In Germany, change-resistant publishers are trying to shake down Google, while in Britain the headline makers have been making horrid headlines: “The BBC has issued an unreserved apology for a Newsnight report which led to Lord McAlpine being wrongly implicated in the alleged sexual abuse of children at north Wales care homes.”

Journalism in 2012 was replaced by the very worst aspects of Gawkism and HuffPostism.


The end of ink at Newsweek Inc.

Friday, 19 October, 2012 0 Comments

“One day, we’ll see movies with people reading magazines and newspapers on paper and chuckle. Part of me has come to see physical magazines and newspapers as, at this point, absurd. They are like Wile E Coyote suspended three feet over a cliff for a few seconds. They’re still there; but there’s nothing underneath; and […]

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