Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Google Plus Connect on Flickr

Tag: oppression

Tank Man still haunts China’s dictators

Tuesday, 4 June, 2019

On this day in 1989, the so-called Chinese People’s Liberation Army slaughtered at least 2,000 peaceful protesters in and around Tiananmen Square. The most iconic photo of the 1989 events was taken on 5 June, the day after the carnage: A lone man stands before an array of battle tanks in Tiananmen Square. He carries two shopping bags. After the leading tank stopped, the man climbed aboard and spoke with the soldiers. He was eventually pulled back into the crowd and disappeared. The Chinese government claims it has never found him. Everyone else believe he is in an unmarked grave.

Tank Man has become the defining image of China’s Tiananmen Square protests. An individual standing in the way of mass oppression. Beijing now forbids discussing the massacre and wishes to erase Tank Man from history, but he lives on in memory.

Tomorrow here, China’s work on facial feature discovery for ethnicity recognition.

Tank Man


A Persian Spring?

Saturday, 30 December, 2017 0 Comments

“The protests started Thursday in Mashhad, Iran’s second-most populous city, ostensibly as a revolt against rising prices, corruption and unemployment. The demonstrations soon spread across the country and have grown into a broader display of discontent with Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and President Hassan Rouhani’s repressive regime. Twitter has been a venue for videos of the protests in various cities, with demonstrators shouting slogans like ‘Death to the dictator!'”

That’s from The Wall Street Journal and the story is titled, “New Protests in Iran: Demonstrations spread against the regime and its imperial adventures“. Our sincere hope now for 2018 is a Persian Spring.

The image below is from 1979. That was the year liberals and leftists and feminists in the West failed to support the women of Iran in their struggle against religious oppression in the name of cultural tolerance and moral relativism. Let’s not let it happen again.

Women in Iran protest against Islamic oppression


May Day is mobile in Vietnam

Wednesday, 1 May, 2013 0 Comments

This time last year, Hanoi experienced the hottest day of 2012, with a high of 39°C and oppressive humidity. The people of Vietnam endured their May Day stoically, however, because they’re used to oppression. Hundreds of dissidents are in prison for challenging the one-party rule of the Communist Party. No independent media is allowed, pro-democracy blogs are banned, protests are forbidden and civil rights activists face constant harassment and persecution.

May Day in Vietnam

Yesterday marked the 38th anniversary of the fall of Saigon and the withdrawal of US troops from Vietnam, but the vocal anti-war protesters of the 1960s and ’70s never speak out about what’s happening in the country today and neither do they demonstrate to help make Vietnam a freer country, like they so passionately professed to care about four decades ago. Still, there is hope. Access to independent sources of information is expanding rapidly thanks to the mobile phone, which is the ultimate status symbol, and people seem to be connected all the time. Texting while zipping around on the ubiquitous motorbikes is routine and answering phones while driving or in meetings is commonplace. If you want a SIM card, and thus a new number, just hand over a few dollars on a Hanoi street. No photo ID is required. All this suggests that the iron grip of the Party cannot endure forever. A May Day might yet come when the people of Vietnam are truly free.