Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Google Plus Connect on Flickr

Tag: publishing

Sérotonine sells

Wednesday, 9 January, 2019

On average, a French novel sells around 5,000 copies. In comparison, Sérotonine, the latest work by Michel Houellebecq, sold 90,332 hardback copies in its first three days, according to L’Observateur.

Houellebecq’s publisher, Flammarion, took a calculated gamble with an initial print run of 320,000 copies but it looks as if it’s going to pay off handsomely. Sérotonine is being published in German, Spanish and Italian this week and it will appear in English in September. «Mes croyances sont limitées, mais elles sont violentes. Je crois à la possibilité du royaume restreint. Je crois à l’amour.» — Michel Houellebecq.

Michel Houellebecq


Facebook: Earnings and Yearnings

Tuesday, 28 October, 2014 0 Comments

Can Facebook keep telling its growth story? The social network reports third quarter earnings this evening and expectations are high. Last quarter it generate revenue of $1.81 billion, a 53 percent increase from the same quarter a year ago and, as The Motley Fool encapsulates it, “shares up 45% in 2014 and nearly 200% since the start of 2013.” While all this is good news for investors, not everyone is thrilled by the rise and rise of the behemoth. Take publishers, for instance.

Their increasing dependency on referral social media traffic and Facebook’s increasing focus on mobile is creating a relationship that’s potentially ruinous. The inability of traditional publishers to create pages that load rapidly on mobile devices has led Facebook to dangle a lure. “One possibility it mentioned was for publishers to simply send pages to Facebook that would live inside the social network’s mobile app and be hosted by its servers; that way, they would load quickly with ads that Facebook sells. The revenue would be shared.” That’s what David Carr wrote in the New York Times on Sunday in a piece titled Facebook Offers Life Raft, but Publishers Are Wary. And so they should be, because attractive and all as this might appear, Carr quickly adds, “Media companies would essentially be serfs in a kingdom that Facebook owns.”

Can this grim fate be avoided? Over at Gigaom, Mathew Ingram follows up on Carr’s article and suggests that salvation might be found in offering readers the things Facebook cannot. Snippet:

“For me, the only possible route to survival (notice I didn’t use the word prosperity or success, just survival) is to play in Facebook’s sandbox, but to give up as little as possible — and at the same time, to spend as much or more effort on figuring out how to make your content as engaging and social as it can be on your own terms. Give readers the ability to do things that Facebook can’t or won’t: the ability to interact with you, to be part of the process… If you hand all of your content and relationships over to Facebook and assume that your work is done, then you have already lost.”

But what if the war has been lost? This chart from Shareaholic shows just how dominant Facebook is in the social media traffic business. We know enough now about its yearnings. They are being powered by its earnings and that’s why this evening’s results are so important.

Facebook traffic


Awful German word of the day: Leistungsschutzrecht

Monday, 5 November, 2012 1 Comment

It could be translated as “right to protection of achievement”, but that wouldn’t make much sense as the word is almost exclusively used in the context of the publishing industry. There, Leistungsschutzrecht has a translatable meaning akin to “ancillary copyright”, but if we cut to the chase it means “the right of the German media […]

Continue Reading »