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Tag: rain

That ancient fence, the night

Thursday, 8 November, 2018

“The unwelcome November rain had perversely stolen the day’s last hour and pawned it with that ancient fence, the night.” F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

November night at home


The Unmothered

Sunday, 8 May, 2016 0 Comments

Given that our blog is called Rainy Day, we’re adding malkosh to our vocabulary of raindrops and teardrops. Backgrounder:

“I always thought that literature’s draw lay in making me identify with people and situations that were as different from my lived experience as possible. But my mother’s death changed that. It made me seek out my own kind — the left-behind and the heartbroken. The unmothered.”

So writes Ruth Margalit in a New Yorker essay titled The Unmothered. To express the immense sense of loss she feels without her mother, Margalit calls ups the Hebrew word malkosh, which means “last rain,” and which can only be applied in retrospect:

“When it’s raining, you have no way of knowing that the falling drops would be the last ones of the year. But then time goes by, the clouds clear, and you realize that that rain shower was the one. Having a mother — being mothered — is similar, in a way. It’s a term that I only fully grasp now, with the thirst of hindsight: who she was, who I was for her, what she has equipped me with.

Like a last rain, my mother left behind an earthy scent that lingered long after she was gone. Like a last rain, for a fleeting moment, everything she touched seemed to glow.”

Rain and tears


Rain: Too much and not nearly enough

Monday, 8 June, 2015 0 Comments

“Do not be angry with the rain; it simply does not know how to fall upwards,” said Vladimir Nabokov. His comment is atypical as rain rarely earns a good punch line. Worse, in a rapidly urbanizing world, rain is regarded as a nuisance and few people have a kind word to say for it. The stuff that fills shoes, wrecks hairdos and allows unscrupulous umbrella sellers to practice a form of surge pricing that would make Uber envious lacks a lobby. But that should change soon thanks to Cynthia Barnett, author of Rain: A Natural and Cultural History. Using humour and science she examines rain’s role through the ages, and what emerges is a unifying force of nature that has nourished our planet for more than four billion years. Snippet:

“Rain brings us together in one of the last untamed encounters with nature that we experience routinely, able to turn the suburbs and even the city wild. Huddled with our fellow humans under construction scaffolding to escape a deluge, we are bound in the memory and mystery of exhilarating, confounding, life-giving rain.” Cynthia Barnett, Rain: A Natural and Cultural History

Rain


Pluvial

Wednesday, 8 October, 2014 0 Comments

Definition: a pluviophile is a lover of rain; someone who finds joy and peace of mind during rainy days. Origin: Latin pluvialis, from pluvia rain, from feminine of pluvius rainy, from pluere to rain. Note: A psekaphile is one who likes drizzling rain, and an hyetophile is one who likes rain in general.


Pouring in Mumbai

Tuesday, 12 November, 2013 1 Comment

Containing notions of frugality and deluge, the concept of “the rainy day” offers endless opportunity for cogitation and blogging. “The Rain” is a video clip by Harshal Chavan, who describes it as a “small compilation of footage I shot during rainy days.”


Seldom is Friday all the weeke like

Friday, 20 January, 2012

Friday is not like any other day, said Geoffrey Chaucer in his Canterbury Tales. In “The Knight’s Tale” section, which deals with the ups and downs of a threesome involving Palamon, Arcite and Emily, the narrator compares the lovesick moodiness of the protagonists to the changeability of the weather on a Friday, a day famous for its meteorological tantrums:

“Now up, now down, as bucket in a well
Right as the Friday, soothly for to tell
Now shineth it, and now it raineth fast
Right so can geary Venus overcast
The heartes of her folk, right as her day
Is gearful, right so changeth she array
Seldom is Friday all the weeke like.”

And it’s true. Outside the window, it raineth fast.