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Tag: refugees

The cruelty and inhumanity of the “brothers”

Friday, 4 September, 2015 1 Comment

The image of Aylan Kurdi dead on a Turkish beach is being portrayed as Europe’s disgrace. What it really illustrates, in fact, is the cruelty and inhumanity the wealthy Gulf Arab states that are refusing to help Syria’s refugees. On Wednesday, Amira Fathalla of BBC Monitoring sought to explain “Why Syrians do not flee to Gulf states.” The harsh reality is that “Without a visa, Syrians are not currently allowed to enter Arab countries except for Algeria, Mauritania, Sudan and Yemen,” she wrote. One cannot imagine that there’s a long line of refugees waiting to enter Sudan and Yemen.

Today, in the Washington Post, Ishaan Tharoor follows up and spells out the inhumanity of the neighbours: “The Arab world’s wealthiest nations are doing next to nothing for Syria’s refugees.” Here, he names and shames: “six Gulf countries — Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Oman and Bahrain — have offered zero resettlement places to Syrian refugees.” Shame be upon them.

Arab states


Heading for the freedom train in Keleti

Wednesday, 2 September, 2015 0 Comments

“Hungarian police cleared hundreds of migrants desperate to get to Germany from Budapest’s main railway stations on Tuesday, prompting protests and confusion at a site that has become the latest focus of Europe’s refugee crisis.” So reports the Wall Street Journal in an article titled “Chaos Erupts in Budapest as Hungary Clears Migrants From Train Station“.

The focus of the drama is Keleti, which was constructed in eclectic style between 1881 and 1884 and was considered one of the most modern railway stations in Europe at the time. In May, your blogger passed through Keleti and it was obvious then that it was a magnet for Middle East migrants making their way to northern Europe. Kelati will remain in the news until Europe agrees on anti-trafficking and nation-building policies for Africa, the Middle East and the Balkans. In the meantime, terror, repression and dire economic circumstances will continue to convince young people that the only way to a better life is to emigrate and board those trains in Budapest.

Kelati faces

This just in: “Hungary will register all migrants that come to the country and send economic migrants back to the state from which they first entered its borders.”


Millions of migrants are on the march

Tuesday, 1 September, 2015 0 Comments

“It is projected that sub-Saharan Africa will have 900 million more inhabitants in the next 20 years. Of these, at least 200 million will be young people looking for work. The chaos of their countries of origin will push them further north.” So wrote Massimo Nava in Corriere della Sera a week ago.

The European Union is deeply divided about how to deal with the massive migration crisis that’s unfolding on its shore, in its mountains and at its train stations. Border controls are being blatantly ignored and policy is being made up on the fly. The proverb becomes reality: “Every man for himself (and the devil take the hindmost).” Example: A law aimed at discouraging refugees from settling in Denmark comes into effect today.

The plight of millions of human beings, exploited by traffickers and terrorized by religious fanatics, is distressing and only a person with a heart of stone would deny refuge to the exhausted and the traumatized, but beyond the individual and group suffering there’s a bigger challenge that demands an urgent, global response. The mass migration we are currently witnessing is a consequence of the real-time disintegration of states in the Middle East and North Africa. If this is not addressed, these endless waves of the displaced will erode the stability of the host countries. Such instability would turn Europe into a very disagreeable place, for both natives and migrants.

Those who find this kind of scenario apocalyptic, should note that countries and federations that wish to protect their sovereignty and citizens (the real purpose of government, after all) must control their borders. This does not exclude sympathy for those fleeing failed states, but the solution is to stabilize and rebuild failed states, not accept massive, unplanned shifts in population.

If the citizens of Syria, Libya, Eritrea, Bangladesh and all the other places that people are fleeing from cannot have decent lives at home, they’ll try to find better ones abroad. Unless Brussels, Washington, the Arab League, the African Union and ASEAN co-operate on this emergency, the situation is going to get much more frightening and Raspail’s fiction will become fact.

Syria


The Mediterranean: The world’s most dangerous sea

Thursday, 11 December, 2014 0 Comments

More than 207,000 people have crossed the Mediterranean since 1 January this year seeking refuge in Europe. Of these, 3,419 perished in the sea — making it the world’s deadliest migration route. Last week, 17 African migrants died from hypothermia when they tried to travel from Libya to Italy in a small boat.

the Mediterranean

Many of the refugees are from Syria, where war has raged for nearly four years, but an increasing number are from Eritrea, where national service, in the form of indefinite conscription, amounts to forced labour. How bad are things in Eritrea? In its 2014 Press Freedom Index, Reporters Without Borders ranked the county’s media environment at the very bottom of a list of 178 countries, just below North Korea. It’s high time for the EU to get tough with the brutal regime in Asmara. The root causes of why its people are fleeing and drowning in the Mediterranean have to be addressed, otherwise the numbers at the end of 2015 will be even more grim.


Advent appeal for Syria’s refugees

Friday, 29 November, 2013 0 Comments

The numbers coming out of Syria are numbing. The latest UN report warns of “a generation of damaged children” because more than half of the 2.2 million Syrian war refugees are, in fact, children. Up to 300,000 Syrian children living in Lebanon and Jordan could be without schooling by the end of this year, and the suffering of Syrian refugee children in Turkey is appalling. “Under rain and without shoes, Syrian refugee kids fight for lives in Istanbul” reports Today’s Zaman. Snippet:

“The biggest ethnic group among those who leave for Turkey are Sunni Arabs, who cannot speak Turkish to find a job.On Tuesday, heavy rain hit Istanbul, making it impossible for Syrian refugees to remain in parks. In Istanbul’s Şirinevler neighborhood, for instance, an IHA correspondent photographed several Syrian children, some of whom even lacked shoes and were living under a small tent made of plastic bags.”

As we prepare to celebrate the onset of Advent on Sunday, our thoughts should turn to these most vulnerable victims of the Syrian conflict. Those doing incredible work for Syria’s war refugees include The International Rescue Committee, Doctors Without Borders, Save the Children, The International Medical Corps and The International Orthodox Christian Charities. They deserve our support at the time of year when thoughts are meant to turn to “Peace on the earth, good will to men.”

Syrian refugees