Tag: Ridley Scott

Dilma & Hillary, Thelma & Louise

Friday, 22 April, 2016 0 Comments

Zanny Minton Beddoes, Editor-in-Chief of the Economist, is offering readers two covers this week. Latin America gets “The great betrayal,” which is about the economic crisis in Brazil and the upcoming impeachment of its president, Dilma Rousseff. The country is in a state of despair as it fights its worst recession since the 1930s, and the real should stop at Ms Rousseff’s desk, but the Economist is magnanimous: “The failure is not only of Ms Rousseff’s making. The entire political class has let the country down through a mix of negligence and corruption.”

For the rest of the world, the Economist cover features Hillary Clinton. “Could she fix it?” America, that is. It’s a lukewarm leader, peppered with reservations such as “Mrs Clinton’s solutions too often seem feeble,” and “her policies are fiddly.” As she rolls up her sleeves to retune the USA’s rusty engine, the lack of enthusiasm is startling: “Yet, rather than thrilling to the promise of taking the White House or of electing America’s first woman president, many Democrats seem joyless.”

The Economist Latin America The Economist Clinton

It’s been 25 years since Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis hit the highway in Thelma & Louise, Ridley Scott’s road movie that put women in the driver’s seat, finally. The film kept them at the wheel all the way to the vivid end as they flew into the blue yonder above the Grand Canyon in a green Thunderbird convertible. In Paste Monthly, Amanda Schurr remains transformed by it all. Snippet:

“… their flight from Oklahoma to Mexico is urgent, telling and inimitably American. Leave it to Ridley Scott, taking visual inspiration from Terrence Malick’s Badlands, and the sweeping flyovers of fellow Brit cinematographer Adrian Biddle to capture the promise and danger of the scorched West — the film was shot largely in California and Utah, and it’s never looked more stunning, nor strangely unsentimental and unforgiving.”

A bit like the electorates in Brazil and the USA, “unsentimental and unforgiving.”


Liam Neeson in ‘Death of an OLED TV Salesman’

Wednesday, 3 February, 2016 0 Comments

In conjunction with Sunday’s Super Bowl 50, LG has just released a commercial for its Signature OLED TV. It must have cost a fortune as it stars Liam Neeson and was produced by Ridley Scott. Is it a winner? The Verge is deathly: “…we’ve got a schlocky 60-second journey through a Tron knock-off fantasy land, with Neeson growling cliches about how ‘the future belongs to us.'” John Gruber is equally morbid: “As with many Super Bowl ads, I feel like they would’ve gotten more bang for their buck by just setting fire to a few million dollars in cash and putting the video on YouTube.”

“My character is an enigmatic man from the future who has traveled back to the present day on a very important mission,” said Liam Neeson to/for LG. “He represents that inner appeal, that curiosity we have to find out about the future.”

One gets the feeling at times that Ridley Scott has made a handsome trade of recycling memes from the iconic television commercial that introduced the Apple Macintosh personal computer. But is LG happy to be placed in a spectrum that’s 30 years behind Apple? Is it so incurious that it’s willing to be associated with a tired rerun of “1984”?


Facebook is for Facebook

Monday, 24 June, 2013 0 Comments

Facebook is like that terrifying extraterrestrial bio-mechanical thing in Alien, the brilliant film directed by Ridley Scott and starring Sigourney Weaver, Harry Dean Stanton, John Hurt and Ian Holm. Well, that’s one way of reading this superb essay by Paul Ford on the crux of the social network titled “The Strangeness of Facebook Home“. Snippet:

“The social network, however, is not a tool but a way of being. If you want to leave a note for yourself on Facebook, using the service as a notebook, you must share it with yourself — selecting the ‘only me’ option from a list that also includes ‘public’ and ‘friends.’ It’s funny how rarely people ask what Facebook is for. We’ve just come to accept it, this mountain that rose up one day and is never quite out of view. It’s not really for anything, certainly not for tasks and documents. It’s for perpetuating and improving the social graph. It’s for Facebook.”

Back in 1979, Alien was marketed with the tagline, “In space, no-one can hear you scream.” That was before we became aware of deep cyberspace.