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Tag: Salman Rushdie

How to defeat terrorism? Don’t be terrorized

Sunday, 11 January, 2015 0 Comments

Under the slogan Tous Unis!, the Socialist government of President Hollande has called for a show of national unity today in Paris after three days of Islamist bloodshed. Angela Merkel, David Cameron, Matteo Renzi, Mariano Rajoy, Petro Poroshenko — among 30 world leaders in all — will walk from Place de la République to Place de la Nation in one of the most iconic public events in the history of postwar France. The signal that needs to go out to the world today from these leaders is this: There is a price for living in a free society, and all citizens must pay it. The following aides-mémoire should help them formulate their message:

“The fundamentalist believes that we believe in nothing. In his world-view, he has his absolute certainties, while we are sunk in sybaritic indulgences. To prove him wrong, we must first know that he is wrong. We must agree on what matters: kissing in public places, bacon sandwiches, disagreement, cutting-edge fashion, literature, generosity, water, a more equitable distribution of the world’s resources, movies, music, freedom of thought, beauty, love. These will be our weapons. Not by making war but by the unafraid way we choose to live shall we defeat them.

How to defeat terrorism? Don’t be terrorized. Don’t let fear rule your life. Even if you are scared.” — Salman Rushdie

“What matters is abuse, and how it is anchored in a religion that denies women their rights as humans. What matters is that atrocities against women and children are carried out in Europe. What matters is that governments and societies must stop hiding behind a hollow pretense of tolerance so that they can recognize and deal with the problem.” — Ayaan Hirsi Ali

“Now is as good a time as ever to revisit the history of the Crusades, or the sorry history of partition in Kashmir, or the woes of the Chechens and Kosovars. But the bombers of Manhattan represent fascism with an Islamic face, and there’s no point in any euphemism about it. What they abominate about ‘the West,’ to put it in a phrase, is not what Western liberals don’t like and can’t defend about their own system, but what they do like about it and must defend: its emancipated women, its scientific inquiry, its separation of religion from the state.” — Christopher Hitchens


Christopher Hitchens on Charlie Hebdo

Friday, 9 January, 2015 1 Comment

In February 2006, the late, much lamented Christopher Hitchens addressed the “international Muslim pogrom against the free press”. In light of the Charlie Hebdo massacre, his words are need re-reading today:

“When Salman Rushdie published The Satanic Verses in 1988, he did so in the hope of forwarding a discussion that was already opening in the Muslim world, between extreme Quranic literalists and those who hoped that the text could be interpreted. We know what his own reward was, and we sometimes forget that the fatwa was directed not just against him but against ‘all those involved in its publication,’ which led to the murder of the book’s Japanese translator and the near-deaths of another translator and one publisher. I went on Crossfire at one point, to debate some spokesman for outraged faith, and said that we on our side would happily debate the propriety of using holy writ for literary and artistic purposes. But that we would not exchange a word until the person on the other side of the podium had put away his gun.”


Finishing the race

Monday, 21 April, 2014 0 Comments

Today, Easter Monday, the the 118th edition of the Boston Marathon will take place. Despite last year’s bombings by Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev near the finish line, killing three and injuring more than 260, some 36,000 people have signed up for this year’s event. “How do you defeat terrorism?” Salman Rushdie was once asked. His answer: “Don’t be terrorized.”

Boston


Iranian head hunters at the Frankfurt Book Fair

Wednesday, 19 September, 2012

On Monday we learned that Iran had increased the bounty on the head of the British author Salman Rushdie to $3.3 million. When the perverse Ayatollah Khomeini called for the murder of Rushdie in 1989, the Frankfurt Book Fair, to its credit, excluded Iran for three years from its precincts, but now this outlier of […]

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No saying the unsayable in India and beyond

Friday, 3 February, 2012

Freedom of speech has changed from being a hallmark of democracy to a threat to society, at least in India, writes Kenan Malik in an essay titled To Name the Unnamable, which was prompted by the Muslim threats that prevented Salman Rushdiee from attending the recent Jaipur Literary Festival. Malik is particularly critical of the […]

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