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Tag: scandal

You should not believe that the night sky is BLU

Sunday, 4 December, 2016 0 Comments

In June last year, the South Florida Business Journal noted that Samuel Ohev-Zion, CEO of “rapidly growing mobile firm” BLU Products, had paid $11 million for a mansion in Golden Beach, just north of Miami Beach. Because it’s one of the few places in Miami-Dade County where people can buy mansions directly on the ocean, Golden Beach is appropriately named. The seller was Sergey A. Solonin, and he was described as CEO and president of Cyprus-based Qiwi Plc, an international online payments firm, and chairman of the Investment Banking Group Russian Investment Club.

BLU Clearly there’s a lot of money in the “rapidly growing mobile” business, especially if one makes budget Android phones as Samuel Ohev-Zion does.

But “budget” isn’t always inexpensive or a synonym for integrity. Fast forward to now and Blu says it’s replacing the Chinese software that stole user data with Google-approved software. The scandal, which was unveiled two weeks ago by security firm Kryptowire, involved a firmware-updating app that monitored user communications and sent back text messages to a keyword-searchable archive on a Chinese server. Shanghai Adups Technology Co., Ltd, the Chinese app maker, claims its data collection tool was not designed for US phones, and that the data has since been deleted. And if you believe that, you’ll believe anything.

Reportedly, a seemingly contrite Sammy Ohev-Zion, now says BLU will “not install third-party applications where we don’t have the source code and don’t understand the behavior.” And if you believe that, you’ll believe everything.


Giovanni Trapattoni kicks off our Italian week

Monday, 18 February, 2013 0 Comments

Italy is very much in the news these days. For instance, there’s a critical general election next weekend and that will be followed by the papal conclave in Rome as a result of the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. True to form, these major events have been preceded by the arrest of the former head of the country’s third largest bank for alleged fraud and bribery, and the arrest of the chairman of the air defense group Finmeccanica over his alleged involvement in a corruption scandal.

Life goes on, however, and that symbol of a kinder, gentler Italy, Giovanni Trapattoni, will today preside over the opening a new shopping mall in Munich. Trap, as fans call him, managed local team Bayern Munich for two seasons and he remains very popular in the Bavarian capital because of his style, charm and cryptic use of German. The expression “Ich habe fertig!” (“I’m done!”) is a legendary Trapattonism that owes its linguistic fame to his usage of the verb habe (have) instead of bin (am) during an emotional press conference and has since become part of spoken German.

Fertig!

Beneath the jolly exterior, beats a canny heart and Trapattoni struck a one of the century’s best deals in 2008 when he convinced the Football Association of Ireland to appoint him as manager of the national squad on a munificent salary of €2 million a year, plus €750,000 a year for his backroom team. It was this kind of profligacy that saw Ireland seek an EU bailout in 2010 and in a selfless gesture of burden-sharing a year later, Trapattoni agreed to have his pay cut to €1 million per annum. Odd jobs like opening a shopping mall in prosperous Munich helps Trap to cope with that sharp drop in income.

Whilst in Munich, the devout Catholic Giovanni Trapattoni will, no doubt, find time to pray for the Bavarian Pope, Benedetto, who is the subject of tomorrow’s post here.


They eat horses, don’t they?

Friday, 15 February, 2013 0 Comments

In the magazine business, the less-is-more pivot is executed when the jovial publisher cuts the number of pages but keeps the cover price as it is. The consumers won’t notice the difference, is the theory. The gangsters behind the horse-meat lasagna scandal have borrowed this page, as it were, and European supermarkets are now filling up with products whose ingredients have been cheapened to maintain the price. As with the magazine with fewer pages, nobody noticed a difference in the taste when horse replaced beef in frozen lasagna.

This is a huge story involving a continent-wide web of slaughter houses in Romania, traders in Cyprus and the Netherlands, companies in France, including a subcontractor of Findus, which shipped the horsemeat to Luxembourg where it was turned into the lasagna that then filled freezers across Europe. But what started as a beef-burger scandal in Ireland and then became a lasagna outrage in Britain is now expanding exponentially. In France, cannelloni, spaghetti bolognese, moussaka and hachis parmentier have been pulled from shelves at six supermarket chains. On Wednesday, the French brand, Picard, found horse meat in its chili con carne.

Findus is full of surprises

Catherine Brown, chief executive of the Foods Standards Agency in the UK, called for retailers to test their dishes containing ‘pork,’ ‘chicken’ and other meats. Retailers are currently focusing on ‘comminuted‘ beef, she said, calling it ‘the stuff where meat is ground up to the point that it is not readily recognizable.’

Because horsemeat is cheap, the gangsters in the food industry decided to mince it up, stuff it in the lasagna, call it ‘beef’, freeze it and then laugh all the way to the bank, safe in the knowledge that the consumers sticking it in the microwave will never taste the difference. Findus and lots of other companies in the food industry are now playing the “It wasn’t me guv” card, but it won’t work. If they had wanted to know what that cheap meat was and where it was coming from they could have found out and refused to use it. They didn’t want to, of course. What mattered was keeping those profit margins up.

Yesterday’s news that Greek unemployment had hit a new record of 27 percent in November means that price pressure is becoming unbearable for consumer product companies in the EU and some of them are responding to this pauperization by producing food that is being debased constantly. This just in: “Irish food group Greencore became the latest company to become embroiled in the horse meat scandal when it confirmed it manufactured bolognese sauce that British retailer Asda has withdrawn from the shelves after it was found to contain horse meat.”

This one is going to run and run.


The horse is inside

Thursday, 17 January, 2013 1 Comment

Today’s stomach-churning headline is provided by The Daily Telegraph: “Beef contaminated with horse meat sold in Britain for ‘several years'”. Appetizer: “Seven of the leading supermarkets have cleared their shelves of frozen beefburgers after a supplier sold Tesco products which were 29 per cent horse meat.”

Because there’s a murky Irish connection in this scandal, now is a good time to roll out the Rubberbandits, a pair of lads from, er, lovely, Limerick, who know their equine affairs, outside and inside. “They’re a hip-hop comedy duo from Limerick who rap about horses and terrorism,” states The Guardian today, and asks: “Is Britain ready for the Rubberbandits?” Timing is everything, and it’s an ill wind… and all that.


The BBC is a Stickler for details. Except when it isn’t.

Monday, 12 November, 2012 0 Comments

“If all goes well we’ve got a Newsnight out tonight about a very senior political figure who is a paedophile.” That’s what Iain Overton tweeted on the morning of Friday, 2 November. It may yet go down in history as the tweet that sunk the BBC. Who is Iain Overton? He is the “Managing Editor” […]

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Jimmy Savile will put a stake through the rotten heart of the BBC

Monday, 15 October, 2012

On 29 October last year, Jimmy Savile died. On 9 October this year, he returned from the dead. And this time round the undead DJ is dragging around with him a stake that will be driven through the rotten heart of the BBC. For make no mistake, the fact that the BBC spiked a story […]

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