Tag: Sharia

The Saudis and the Brotherhood: love turns to hate

Tuesday, 20 August, 2013

“On Monday, Saudi Arabia promised to compensate Egypt for any aid that Western countries might withdraw in response to the harsh tactics employed by Egypt’s leaders to quell protests by supporters of the country’s deposed president, in which nearly 1,000 people and more than 100 police officers are reported to have been killed.” — Backing Egypt’s generals, Saudi Arabia promises financial support

Later in her Washington Post report, Liz Sly writes, “That Saudi Arabia is prepared to confront Washington over the crisis is an indicator of how deeply Saudi leaders were unsettled by the prospect of the Muslim Brotherhood consolidating its hold over the Arab world’s most populous nation, analysts say.”

Muslim Brotherhood Times have changed, especially in the relationship between the Saudis and the Muslim Brotherhood.

In 1952, Gamel Abdel Nasser and a group of fellow military officers overthrew King Farouk and turned to Sayyid Qutb and the Muslim Brotherhood for popular support. However, the Brotherhood wanted to outlaw alcohol and introduce the religious law of Islam, sharia, in the new, post-monarchical Egypt, a price that was too high for Nasser and his Revolutionary Council. It banned the Brotherhood in 1954, then undid the ban, but after an attempt on Nasser’s life, reinstated the ban.

In Terror and Liberalism, Paul Berman notes what happened next:

“Leading figures from the Muslim Brotherhood fled from Egypt to Saudi Arabia, and the Saudi rulers welcomed them, and put them to good use. The Saudi princes were determined to keep their own country on a path of pure adherence to Saudi Arabia’s antique and rigid version of Islam; and Egypt’s Islamist intellectuals, with their stores of Koranic knowledge, had much to offer. The Egyptian exiles took over professorial chairs in Saudi universities. And their impact was large. Qutb’s younger brother, Muhammad Qutb, a distinguished religious scholar in his own right, fled to Saudi Arabia and became a professor of Islamic Studies. One of his students was Osama bin Laden.”

Sayyid Qutb, however, stayed in Egypt and Nasser hanged him in 1966. By then, though, the damage was done and the religious fascism represented by Qutb and the Muslim Brotherhood has since left a trail of death and suffering that stretches from the banks of the Nile to lower Manhattan. It has also steered Saudi Arabia towards barbarism and although it’s a bit late in the day for the princely descendants of the princes who imported Qutb’s toxic ideology to acknowledge their capital mistakes, it is better that it’s done late rather than never. Unless they wish to be devoured by the radicals, the Saudis and the Egyptians know that the Muslim Brotherhood must be smashed.


The Iran Tribunal and the crimes of Khomeini

Friday, 8 February, 2013 0 Comments

While watching Argo, I was reminded that the enduring image of the Iranian nightmare was snapped 34 years ago this month: the return of Ayatollah Khomeini to Tehran from France. Although 10 February is celebrated as Revolution Day in Iran, the arrival of Khomeini on 1 February 1979 remains the key moment. On the Air France flight to Tehran, he was asked by ABC News reporter Peter Jennings: “What do you feel in returning to Iran?” Khomeini answered: Hichi (“Nothing”). This one-word statement was considered indicative of his mystical nature by both Islamic fanatics in Iran and useful idiots in the West. By the way, last year’s commemoration of Khomeini’s homecoming was a bit weird as it involved a giant cut-out figure of the old psychopath.

Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini

Meanwhile, the report of the Iran Tribunal has been released. It found that during the 1980s the Islamic Republic was guilty of the murder of between 15,000 and 20,000 political prisoners. Quote: “The religious fervour of these crimes makes them even more shocking: for instance, a woman’s rape was frequently the last act that preceded her execution in Iran, as under the ‘Sharia’ law guidelines, the execution of a virgin female is non-permissible.” Iran is in the hands of evil and medieval people. How long more?


Punishing the adulterer Petraeus

Thursday, 22 November, 2012 0 Comments

This is a tricky one for Western jurists (and journalists) because they are divided as to whether adultery is a crime or a sin or a lifestyle choice. From a Shariah point of view, it’s simple: He should be stoned to death. Well, that’s what the Taliban say, and they have form in these matters […]

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