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Tag: Spectator

Binning Corbyn

Thursday, 8 June, 2017 0 Comments

Nick Cohen describes himself as “a passionate leftist and liberal,” but he won’t be voting for Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn in today’s United Kingdom general election. Writing in the Spectator’s Coffee House section, Cohen offers a list of facts about Corbyn “which have not previously been collated in one place” and orders them under three headings: “Ethics, Leadership & Electability, and Social Media & Activists.” Nick Cohen says, “The reader can make up their own mind, based on these facts.”

One heading is of particular interest here and is titled “Against peace in Ireland.” Cohen says that Corbyn supported the IRA, opposed the Northern Ireland peace process and aligned himself with terrorists. Sample:

“Corbyn was general secretary of the editorial board of the hard-left journal Labour Briefing which supported IRA violence and explicitly backed the Brighton Hotel Bombing, which killed 5 people and maimed 31 others. In its December 1984 leader, the editorial board ‘disassociated itself’ from an article criticising the Brighton bombing, saying the criticism was a ‘serious political misjudgement’. The board said it ‘reaffirmed its support for, and solidarity with, the Irish republican movement’, and added that ‘the British only sit up and take notice when they are bombed into it’. Alongside its editorial, the board reprinted a speech by Gerry Adams describing the bombing as a ‘blow for democracy’. The same edition carried a reader’s letter praising the ‘audacity’ of the IRA attack and stating: ‘What do you call four dead Tories? A start.'”

Jeremy Corbyn is unfit for high office and British voters should reject him today.

Gerry Adams


A cheery Spectator and a glum Prospect

Monday, 22 August, 2016 0 Comments

At the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, Great Britain won 15 medals, including a solitary gold. Team GB finished 36th in the medal table that year. This year, Great Britain finished second in the table, ahead of China, with 67 medals, 27 of which were gold. The greatest credit for this achievement is due to the athletes, but Sir John Major, whose Conservative government set up the National Lottery in 1994, is central to their success. The Lottery started funding athletes in 1997, the so they could train full-time and, by 2004, Team GB’s medal tally had doubled to 30, doubling again at London in 2012.

Andrew Marr credits John Major in his Spectator diary entry written in sunny Dubrovnik amid crowds of contented Croats and tourists. “Team GB is a near-perfect post-Brexit idea” says Marr, inspired by it all and hoping for happy days:

“Imagine a Britain which had seriously invested for the long term, focusing only on industries and technologies where we were likely to be world-class; and where ‘company’ was used in the old sense of being a tight, committed team of friends and allies working together for a goal many years in the future. It would be a Britain shorn of short-term political lurches in funding and direction, whose corporate leaders had a lively sense of how much they owed to their teams and didn’t treat themselves as Medici princelings.”

Prospect But all that is gold does not glisten. Well, not for the “remoaners”, anyway. With a most unfortunate sense of timing, Prospect depicts Team GB stuck on a self-imposed, starting line in its race for a place in the world. Jay Elwes, Deputy Editor of Prospect, argues: “…there is a strong case that Britain’s new settlement with the EU should be put to a further vote. As the economic threat posed by Brexit grows ever more apparent, so the need for parliamentary intervention will increase. Britain needs a new plan — in the end, a decision by the Commons not to proceed with Brexit might turn out to be the best plan of all.”

After a summer of gold for spectators, disgruntled remoaners are hoping for the prospect of a winter of discontent and an un-Brexit.


The Independent’s last print editor writes

Thursday, 18 February, 2016 0 Comments

“The business model for printed general news from Monday to Friday is kaput.” So writes Amol Rajan, the editor of The Independent. His entry in the Spectator Diary is titled: “From the start, I knew I’d be the Independent’s last print editor.” So what’s the future for journalism, if not print? Specialism, says Rajan. “Thriving periodicals such as the Spectator and Private Eye can pursue that. But for providers of general news in a landscape dominated by the BBC, free is the future.”

And the future of The Independent? Rajan points to i100. “It’s a kind of smart Buzzfeed that does concise, shareable, video-heavy news.” Typical stories:

  • Everyone’s in love with this man dancing in the cold and it’s not hard to see why
  • This young woman decided to use a paint roller to apply fake tan. Not a great idea
  • Husband asks wife (yes, really) for help with his Tinder profile, immediately lands two dates

Is this kind of bottom feeding the way forward? Michael Wolff threw a very heavy wet blanket on Rajan’s vision on Monday in USA Today: “… the effort to compete with native digital news outlets like BuzzFeed means traditional news organizations, with traditional share price values, must, like the venture-capital supported natives, pay more for traffic than can ever hope to be made back from advertisers. In this model, the digital natives can yet hope to sell to deep-pocket buyers, whereas the traditionals can only go out of business.”

Amol Rajan is right when he says that the business model for printed general news from Monday to Friday is kaput. What he needs to do now is make the Independent brand synonymous with a solution that makes digital general news profitable from Monday to Sunday. The odds are against it, but Yevgeny Lebedev has lots of cash, still.

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