Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Google Plus Connect on Flickr

Tag: tourism

See Klimt, not #Klimt, in Vienna, not #Vienna

Sunday, 9 June, 2019

With Barcelona and Dubrovnik and Venice groaning under the weight of overtourism, land-locked Vienna has decided to target the dread hashtag, so beloved of hipster tourists. Following the techlash, now comes the #hashtaglash.

“This is an invitation from Vienna — an ideal place for a little bit of digital detox and for creating moments that you, and you alone, can treasure forever. Because Vienna is far more colorful when not seen through the lens of a smartphone camera.”

Vienna


Venice goes there. Is Barcelona next?

Wednesday, 27 February, 2019

We’re talking about an entry fee for day tourists entering the lagoon city. Initial plans aim at charging them €3 ($4.75) for a single-day trip from May. In the coming year the fee would double and can be raised to as much as €10 ($15.83) on heavy tourism days.

In 2016, heritage group Italia Nostra estimated that 30 million people visit Venice every year, with a daily influx of more than 82,000. Under the entry fee scheme, visitors staying in hostels will be exempt from the payment, while hotel guests already have to pay a local tax for their stay.

Will Barcelona follow? The city has been groaning under the weight of “over-tourism” for years now and the pressure is on the municipal authorities to reduce the flow or turn into a revenue source that be deployed to deal with the problem. Talking of Barcelona, Márton Mogyorósy takes an overhead view of the city and his photos only confirm why the world wants to go there. Says Mogyorósy, somewhat cryptically:

“A series of aerial photographs from the capital of Catalonia, which captures the city’s abstract and architectural wonders from a bird’s eye view. As the former fishermen’s quarter which is characterized by its narrow and lively streets. As well as one of Barcelona’s lesser-known masterpiece, Ricardo Bofill’s utopian vision for social living that found form in the cubist heights and halls of Walden 7.”

Barca

Barcelona


Social media cliché cont’d: Grammable travel

Saturday, 3 February, 2018 0 Comments

“While the era of mass world tourism and global world travel opened up in the 60s and 70s with the development of Jumbo Jets and low cost airlines, there is a new trend that consists of taking pictures everywhere you go to share it on social networks. During my trip, I felt that many people didn’t really enjoy the moment and were hooked to their smartphones. As if the ultimate goal of travel was to brag about it online and run after the likes and followers.”

So writes Oliver Kmia, who specializes in aerial video and photography. After watching the video on social media cliché made by Hiérophante, which was featured here yesterday, Oliver Kmia decided to do something similar, but focussing on mass tourism:

“I came up with this idea last year while traveling in Roma. I wanted to take a look at the popular Trevi Fountain but I never managed to get close to it. The place was assaulted by hundreds of tourists, some of them formed a huge line to get a spot in front of the Fountain. Needless to say that I was very pissed by this sight and left for the not less crowded Pantheon.”


And where will the Tunisians go?

Thursday, 3 September, 2015 0 Comments

Back in June, a young Tunisian Islamist arrived at a tourist beach in Sousse, on the Gulf of Hammamet, which is a part of the Mediterranean. “In the midday sun, Seifeddine Rezgui pulled a Kalashnikov from a parasol and opened fire on the beach, sending holidaymakers fleeing for their lives. He threw explosives at the pool area before continuing inside the Imperial Marhaba hotel,” reported the BBC. By the time the police shot him, he had murdered 38 tourists. Three months earlier, Islamist terrorists killed 22 people in the Bardo National Museum in Tunis.

Michael J. Totten visited Sousse recently and his post, How to Destroy a City in Five Minutes, is chilling. It is especially relevant in light of the crises that are engulfing North Africa and their knock-on consequences for Europe. Snippet:

“Hotels are laying off workers. Shops are empty and many will have to be closed. The city is reeling with feelings of guilt and anxiety. Guilt because one of their own murdered guests, the gravest possible offense against the ancient Arab code of hospitality, and anxiety because — what now? How will the city survive? How will all the laid-off workers earn a living with their industry on its back? Sousse without tourists is like Hollywood without movies and Detroit without automobile manufacturing.

Even Tunisia’s agriculture economy is crashing. Prices are down by 35 percent because the resorts don’t need to feed tourists anymore.”

What will become of the the unemployed Tunisian hotel workers? How will the country’s agricultural labourers survive the winter? Despite the risks, crossing the Mediterranean may be their best option. The question then is how should they be classified: migrants in search of work or refugees fleeing the barbarism of ISIS?