Tag: Uighurs

China most murderous

Friday, 7 June, 2019

When did it first become obvious that China was a totalitarian police state willing to do anything to advance its goals? Between 1958 and 1962 during Chairman Mao Zedong’s Great Leap Forward is the answer. That forceful transition from an agrarian culture to an industrial society cost millions of Chinese workers their lives. One estimate runs to an astounding 56 million deaths, making Mao the greatest mass murderer of all time. Then came the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), which led to persecution, torture and executions. Many more deaths and countless lives ruined were the price paid for this enormous cruelty and then, in 1989, Beijing’s tanks drove over democracy protesters in Tiananmen Square in another round of savagery.

Since then China’s communists have become more refined in the control of their subjects. Instead of tanks, they’re using the latest surveillance technology to create “a social credit system.” According to the Washington Post:

“China has a radical plan to influence the behavior of its 1.3 billion people: It wants to grade each of them on aspects of their lives to reflect how good (or bad) a citizen they are. Versions of the so-called social credit system are being tested in a dozen cities with the aim of eventually creating a network that encompasses the whole country. Critics say it’s a heavy-handed, intrusive and sinister way for a one-party state to control the population. Supporters, including many Chinese (at least in one survey), say it’ll make for a more considerate, civilized and law-abiding society.”

How a “more considerate, civilized and law-abiding society” is formed when the population doesn’t share the same values as their overlords can be seen seen (or not seen) in Xinjiang in northwest China. It’s there that the autocrats and apparatchiks lock up the Uighurs without trial. Using images form Google Earth and the European Space Agency, John Sudworth of the BBC has documented this enormous crime against humanity in “China’s hidden camps“. As we stated here on Monday with the first of these postings on China, the “People’s Republic” is a menace to civilization.


On the road to Mandalay?

Wednesday, 20 March, 2019

What are the ethical issues involved in visiting a country whose government has been accused of committing atrocities against its own people? We’re not talking China here, although its persecution of the Uighurs is outrageous. Then, there’s Myanmar.

In 2016, ten international travel companies offered sailings on the Irrawaddy, which flows north to south through the heart of Myanmar, from its source in the Himalayas to the Indian Ocean. The cruises were running at close to full capacity but the boom didn’t last long. Unrest involving a Muslim-minority group, the Rohingya, erupted in a region called Rakhine and more than 500,000 Rohingya have since fled to neighbouring Bangladesh. Terms such as “ethnic cleansing” were used to describe the alleged atrocities committed by Myanmar’s military and the country became a political pariah. As for the Burmese people, they’re said to among the most welcoming in Asia and street crime is almost non-existent in Myanmar. Each traveller must make in informed decision before visiting Myanmar, or China, for that matter.


The seventh post of pre-Christmas 2018: July

Wednesday, 19 December, 2018

Last year, China began to detain Uighurs, Kazakhs and other minorities extra-legally in internment camps, which are estimated to hold at least one million people now. Along with compelling the detainees to learn communist doctrine and the Mandarin language in these gulag-style camps, Beijing is building forced labour facilities in the Xinjiang region. We continue our review of the year with a post from 23 July that spells out what China is today: An Empire of Evil.

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Nothing seems to delight a certain section of the chattering class more than the vision of China replacing America as the global hegemon. Out with jeans, peanut butter and bourbon and in with…? Exactly. What will China offer its admirers in Brussels and Silicon Valley: vast markets, cheap labour, re-engineered IP? Beijing offers all these and more and the more includes “a complete and utter lack of respect for the individual or person in China.”

Says who? Says Christopher Balding, an associate professor of business and economics at the HSBC Business School in Shenzhen and author of Sovereign Wealth Funds: The New Intersection of Money and Power. After teaching in China for some years, he’s now returning to the US and his parting shot is a blogpost titled Balding Out. Snippet:

“I rationalize the silent contempt for the existing rules and laws within China as people not respecting the method for creating and establishing the rules and laws. Rather than confronting the system, a superior, or try good faith attempts to change something, they choose a type of quiet subversion by just ignoring the rule or law. This quickly spreads to virtually every facet of behavior as everything can be rationalized in a myriad of ways.

Before coming to China, I had this idea that China was rigid which in some ways it is, but in reality it is brutally chaotic because there are no rules it is the pure rule of the jungle with unconstrained might imposing their will and all others ignoring laws to behave as they see fit with no sense of morality or respect for right.”

For cossetted fans of communism, such as the Guardian columnist Owen Jones, China may offer a more appealing ideology than the one that nurtured Lincoln and Ford, Rosa Parks and Jimi Hendrix, but one suspects that he’d tire very quickly of typing about the glories of the Belt and Road Initiative for the People’s Daily.

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Tomorrow, here, the eight post of pre-Christmas 2018, which is all about a warning the great JG Ballard issued regarding the fanaticism of the political correctness brigade.


Cold War II: America vs. China

Wednesday, 10 October, 2018

A year ago, the President of Interpol, Meng Hongwei, was the pride of China — local boy done good, sort of thing. Then, while visiting his homeland last week, he vanished. Gone Guy. As far as we know, he’s being held under a new form of detention called liuzhi, or “retention in custody.” Under liuzhi, people can be denied access to legal counsel or families for as long as six months. Within that time frame, the thugs of the National Supervisory Commission will extract the desired confessions. Most in the West are still in denial about the true nature of the so-called “People’s Republic,” but one man has decided to speak up. He’s Mike Pence, the US Vice President.

Mike Pence Announces Cold War II” was the headline on an opinion piece yesterday in the Wall Street Journal by Walter Russell Mead. Snippet:

Imperialism and all reactionaries are all paper tigers, 1965 “The Trump administration’s China policy swam into view, and it’s a humdinger. Vice President Mike Pence gave a guide to the approach in a speech last week at the Hudson Institute (where I am a fellow). Denouncing what he called China’s ‘whole of government’ approach to its rivalry with the U.S., Mr. Pence vowed the Trump administration will respond in kind. He denounced China’s suppression of the Tibetans and Uighurs, its ‘Made in China 2025’ plan for tech dominance, and its ‘debt diplomacy’ through the Belt and Road initiative. The speech sounded like something Ronald Reagan could have delivered against the Soviet Union: Mr. Xi, tear down this wall! Mr. Pence also detailed an integrated, cross-government strategy to counter what the administration considers Chinese military, economic, political and ideological aggression.

In the same week as the vice president’s speech, Navy plans for greatly intensified patrols in and around Chinese-claimed waters in the South China Sea were leaked to the press. Moreover, the recently-entered trilateral U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement was revealed to have a clause discouraging trade agreements between member countries and China. The administration indicated it would seek similar clauses in other trade agreements. Also last week, Congress approved the Build Act, a $60 billion development-financing program designed to counter China’s Belt and Road strategy in Africa and Asia. Finally, the White House issued a report highlighting the danger that foreign-based supply chains pose to U.S. military capabilities in the event they are cut off during a conflict.

Any one of these steps would have rated banner headlines in normal times; in the Age of Trump, all of them together barely registered. But this is a major shift in American foreign policy.”

China is a mortal enemy of democracy and freedom. It’s time for people to shout this from the rooftops.

Imperialism and all reactionaries are all paper tigers, 1965