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Tag: video

That Lofoten football field from above

Friday, 15 March, 2019

If you’ve got a PC, you might know that Windows Spotlight is a default feature included in Windows 10 that downloads background images automatically from Microsoft’s Bing search engine and displays them on the lock screen. One of the most popular of those images is the football field on the Lofoten Archipelago in Norway, and that famous football field appears here in the first 20 seconds of “Lofoten from Above” by the excellent Polish photographer and video maker Maciej Ławniczak.


The Kilauea Eruption

Saturday, 24 November, 2018

One of this year’s most impressive expressions of natural violence was provided by Hawaii’s Kīlauea volcano, which wreaked devastation across the Big Island and displaced thousands of people, while destroying 700 houses and wiping out the state’s largest freshwater lake. Andrew Richard Hara captured the grandeur of the lava in flow.


The Italian Puzzle

Friday, 17 August, 2018

The decision by the Lega Serie A to postpone Sunday’s planned games between Sampdoria and Fiorentina and AC Milan and Genoa is fitting. The Ponte Morandi was the main way to drive through the city and countless football fans have used it in the six decades since it was built. Football, which offers entertaining distraction in troubled times, cannot, this time, escape from the shadow of the collapsed bridge, and only its prompt restoration or replacement will satisfy Genoa now.

The contradictions that Italy presents to the world are bewildering. On the one hand, we have the tragic crumbling of a bridge completed in 1967 and, on the other, the Colosseum, which was built 1,938 years, ago continues to stand and astonish. Videographer Kirill Neiezhmakov from Kharkiv in northeast Ukraine explores the Italian puzzle in “Milan in Motion”. As he says: “With massive urban sprawl and a reputation for being the cold Lombard capital, Milan doesn’t feel like a quintessentially Italian metropolis, with settlers from all over the country making their home here, visitors will find all of Italy in one city.”


No words needed: The Sounds of Seoul

Wednesday, 8 August, 2018

On Monday, here, we had “No words needed: The Silence of The Dolomites,” in which the Danish “visual artist” Casper Rolsted presented his “Silence Project” — a central part of his plan to get us to listen to nature “in undisturbed places”.

Today, we have the opposite, in a sense. Brandon Li, “Filmmaker and global nomad” has created a visual urban experience that’s as far from the Dolomites as it’s possible to be. “I spent a month in Seoul and saw a city racing to the future,” says Li. and Both Li and Rolsted offer us images of urban and natural wonder. The beauty is in the eye, and ear, of the beholder.


Synthetic biology

Tuesday, 26 June, 2018

What is it? According to the Royal Society: “Synthetic biology involves the design and construction of novel artificial biological pathways, organisms and devices or the redesign of existing natural biological systems.”

At the core of synthetic biology is DNA editing that will make it inexpensive to modify living organisms to our design specifications, but the outcomes will be so far beyond our current ethical frameworks that art is needed to visualize where the journey is taking us. Given that a video clip is worth many words, this visual essay by Vasil Hnatiuk transports the future of synthetic biology beyond the sci-fi horizon where combinations of organic and mechanical archetypes will life forms that defy imagination.


Páraic and Pearse

Wednesday, 11 April, 2018 0 Comments

No. This is not a post about the Good Friday Agreement, or about the Irish nationalist who was one of the leaders of the Easter Rising in 1916. It’s about Páraic McGloughlin, a professional visual artist living in Sligo, in the West of Ireland, and his professionally musical brother Pearse McGloughlin. Their video mixes sounds with satellite images of the Earth to create something, well, different.


Ybor City

Sunday, 8 October, 2017 0 Comments

Those initial consonants, y and b, make Ybor sound fictional, even science fictional, and there is a created history behind this American city’s origins, but the place is real and Jason Isbell name-checks it in Traveling Alone:

“I quit talking to myself
And listening to the radio a long, long time ago
Damn near strangled by my appetite
In Ybor City on a Friday night
Couldn’t even stand upright
So high, the street girls wouldn’t take my pay
She said come see me on a better day, she just danced away.”

Note: Ybor City is a historic neighbourhood in Tampa, Florida, northeast of downtown. It was founded in the 1880s by Vicente Martinez-Ybor and other cigar manufacturers and became home to thousands of immigrants, mainly from Cuba, Spain and Italy. Today, the residents are mostly creative migrants from Miami, Atlanta and New York.


Scotland the most beautiful

Sunday, 10 September, 2017 0 Comments

1. Scotland: And finally, the world’s most beautiful country is revealed: Scotland. Who can deny that these wild beaches, deep lochs and craggy castles are some of the most wonderful and beautiful sights in the world?”

That was the result of a poll of readers conducted by the Rough Guides travel publisher in a bid to determine “the most beautiful country in the world.” Angus Wright dutifully wrote up the result for The Scotsman, but it’s the comments on his article that take the Walkers Shortbread biscuit:

Rank Bajin: “It’s quite nice when the rain stops. Usually that’s March 28 and June 30 at 3:30pm. The rest of the time you can’t see anything”

Stewart Mckirdy: “Seriously ??? Who did Rough Guides ask ? people from Scotland presumably”

14152956259: “Not Scottish unionists, that’s for sure.”

Paolo Tognini: “Italy has 53 UNESCO World Heritage sites, highest number in the world on a country basis. Scotland has 6. It is obvious that none of the voters has ever visited Italy….. Mind you, I do like Scotland but this survey result needs a reality check.”

RejeanLavoie: “…or…Scotland needs more UNESCO sites and Italy has a complex?”

Ed Watts: “Paolo, with all due respect why “It is obvious that none of the voters has ever visited Italy…..” – I have visited Italy, and had little, if any, interest in UNESCO sites. Italy’s nice, undoubtedly – Scotland’s better.”

Filmmaker Adam Stocker would agree with Ed, there. After driving around Scotland in his (white) van, he made a short video titled “Scotland – Lochs, Mountains & Light”. He included lots of the most beautiful rain, too.


Eliza Carthy & The Wayward Band

Sunday, 25 June, 2017 0 Comments

They’ll be performing with brass, fiddles and bravura in St Canice’s Cathedral on Wednesday 16 August at 8pm as part of this year’s Kilkenny Arts Festival. Hug You Like A Mountain features Teddy Thompson, the son of musicians Richard and Linda Thompson, while Eliza Carthy is the daughter of musicians Martin Carthy and Norma Waterson. It doesn’t get more blue-blooded than this alliance of English folk-rock.


Aeroplane of unrequited love

Friday, 5 May, 2017 0 Comments

He describes himself as “an electronic music producer obsessed by the culture of Ireland.” He’s Daithi. She describes herself as “Singer-songwriter-human, from Co. Kildare, Ireland.” She’s Sinéad White and the two of them wrote Aeroplane.

According to Daithi and Sinéad, the song was inspired by old Irish TV dramas from the 1980s and ’90s. “True to the people of Ireland at the time, the characters in these shows all seem to have a hard time expressing their feelings, and we wanted to write a song that imagined what was going on in their heads, while they stumbled through talking to their love interest. The video for the song uses footage from a short film that was shot in my home town Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare, in the 1990s.”