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Tuesday, 12 March, 2019

The World Wide Web is 30 years old. Congrats! Its founder, the English engineer and computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee, first proposed the system that would become the WWW on 11 March 1989. To celebrate the anniversary, he’s distilled his ideas about the internet in a letter to the world titled, 30 years on, what’s next #ForTheWeb?

“Today, 30 years on from my original proposal for an information management system, half the world is online. It’s a moment to celebrate how far we’ve come, but also an opportunity to reflect on how far we have yet to go.”

This is a very positive opening message from Sir Tim. Sure, lots of bad actors have enriched themselves during the past 30 years thanks to the WWW, but the web is a world of wonders and there’s much to be grateful for. And Sir Tim is indefatigable.

In fact, last September, he announced the launch of Inrupt, co-founded with cybersecurity entrepreneur John Bruce. The goal is “to restore rightful ownership of data back to every web user.” Berners-Lee has been working on a new web platform called Solid for some time now and this will re-imagine how apps store and share personal data. Inrupt will power the development of the Solid platform and transform it to a viable infrastructure for businesses and consumers. The big idea behind Solid is that, instead of a company storing all your personal data on its servers, you keep it on your own personal data “pod” on a Solid server and you can then give individual apps permission to read and write to your pod. Inrupt plans to make money by offering products and services to businesses and individual who want to implement Solid. The company is based in Boston and is backed by the VC firm Glasswing Ventures.

“The fight for the web is one of the most important causes of our time. Today, half of the world is online. It is more urgent than ever to ensure the other half are not left behind offline, and that everyone contributes to a web that drives equality, opportunity and creativity.”

Since attending an HTML course in Dublin at the end of the 1990s, your blogger has done his best to contribute to a web that drives equality, opportunity and creativity. The road goes ever on, however.

“The web is for everyone and collectively we hold the power to change it. It won’t be easy. But if we dream a little and work a lot, we can get the web we want.”

Sir Tim


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