China

On the road to Mandalay?

Wednesday, 20 March, 2019

What are the ethical issues involved in visiting a country whose government has been accused of committing atrocities against its own people? We’re not talking China here, although its persecution of the Uighurs is outrageous. Then, there’s Myanmar.

In 2016, ten international travel companies offered sailings on the Irrawaddy, which flows north to south through the heart of Myanmar, from its source in the Himalayas to the Indian Ocean. The cruises were running at close to full capacity but the boom didn’t last long. Unrest involving a Muslim-minority group, the Rohingya, erupted in a region called Rakhine and more than 500,000 Rohingya have since fled to neighbouring Bangladesh. Terms such as “ethnic cleansing” were used to describe the alleged atrocities committed by Myanmar’s military and the country became a political pariah. As for the Burmese people, they’re said to among the most welcoming in Asia and street crime is almost non-existent in Myanmar. Each traveller must make in informed decision before visiting Myanmar, or China, for that matter.


The Chinese motor is sputtering

Saturday, 2 March, 2019

Writing in The Truth About Cars, Matt Posky notes, “Chinese Auto Market Not As Hot As Everyone Thought.” Snippet:

“Despite amassing a network of factories that could theoretically outproduce the rest of the world, the Asian country’s automotive sector only operates at about half its total capacity. That’s disconcerting. Even Europe, site of some serious industrial headwinds of its own, manages to operate around 70 percent capacity.

While the reasons for China’s woes are ludicrously complicated, one of the most pressing issues is that its economy is slowing much earlier than anticipated. Automakers, both foreign and domestic, almost universally believed that The People’s Republic would surpass the United States as the world’s largest automotive market — and they were right. But investments kept pouring in, factories were built, and the market started to cool prematurely. The situation only grew worse as incentives dried up and people began buying fewer cars; now, 2019 is shaping up to be a very bad year for the nation’s automotive sector.

What will happen when the Chinese proletariat tire of the tyrants who have created this system? It won’t be pretty.


Reminding Tencent of Tiananmen

Saturday, 9 February, 2019

Since the news broke that China’s Tencent is investing $150 million in Reddit, users have been busy posting an image of the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre that Beijing has spent three decades trying to suppress. According to TechCrunch: “Depending on how much follow-on cash Reddit drums up from Silicon Valley investors and beyond, its post-money valuation could reach an epic $3 billion.” Reddit, by the way, is blocked in China and Tencent is also one of the most important engineers building the communist dictatorship’s Great Firewall. All in all, then, a fascinating funder for a Silicon Valley enterprise that’s become an essential platform for free speech.

Tiananmen Square


Bird’s-eye Shanghai

Sunday, 27 January, 2019

Created by Chinese company Bigpixel Technology, this ultra-high-resolution image of Shanghai offers a 360-degree panorama that allows users to pan across and zoom into, so that even people at ground level appear identifiable. The image’s extraordinary clarity results from its 195 gigapixels (195 billion pixels, or 195,000 megapixels). Note: the latest iPhone XS camera takes photos at 12 megapixels.

Shanghai

Shot from 230 metres up on Shanghai’s Oriental Pearl Tower, the image is put together from thousands of smaller photos taken by a range of cameras with 600 millimetre telephoto lenses. The project’s 8,700 photos added up to a massive 2.6 terabytes storage, by the way.


Huawei: China’s 5G Fifth Column

Saturday, 12 January, 2019

“He spoke great Polish. He was a really well-known Chinese guy in Poland and was always around.” The headline on the Wall Street Journal article is, “Chinese Huawei Executive Is Charged With Espionage in Poland.” Snippet:

“For years, Washington has labeled Huawei a national security threat, saying it could be forced by China to use its knowledge of the telecommunications equipment it sells around the world to tap into, or disable, foreign communications networks. Huawei has denied that forcefully through the years. Part of its defense has been that it hadn’t been implicated in overseas spying allegations.

Officers of Poland’s counterintelligence agency this week searched the local Huawei office, leaving with documents and electronic data, as well as the home of the Chinese national, said Stanislaw Zaryn, a spokesman for Poland’s security coordination office. The Chinese individual wasn’t named, but was identified by Polish state television as a graduate of one of China’s top intelligence schools, as well as a former employee of the Chinese consulate in the port city of Gdansk.

People familiar with the matter identified him as Weijing Wang. He is known in Poland as Stanislaw Wang, according to these people and a public LinkedIn page that matches his biographical details.

A person who knew Mr. Wang described him as a well-known figure in local business circles, often spotted at events sponsored by Huawei in Poland. ‘He spoke great Polish,’ this person said. ‘He was a really well-known Chinese guy in Poland and was always around.'”

China is determined to destroy the West. It’s time to close the door on its stalking horses, starting with Huawei.

 ChiSpy


The seventh post of pre-Christmas 2018: July

Wednesday, 19 December, 2018

Last year, China began to detain Uighurs, Kazakhs and other minorities extra-legally in internment camps, which are estimated to hold at least one million people now. Along with compelling the detainees to learn communist doctrine and the Mandarin language in these gulag-style camps, Beijing is building forced labour facilities in the Xinjiang region. We continue our review of the year with a post from 23 July that spells out what China is today: An Empire of Evil.

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Nothing seems to delight a certain section of the chattering class more than the vision of China replacing America as the global hegemon. Out with jeans, peanut butter and bourbon and in with…? Exactly. What will China offer its admirers in Brussels and Silicon Valley: vast markets, cheap labour, re-engineered IP? Beijing offers all these and more and the more includes “a complete and utter lack of respect for the individual or person in China.”

Says who? Says Christopher Balding, an associate professor of business and economics at the HSBC Business School in Shenzhen and author of Sovereign Wealth Funds: The New Intersection of Money and Power. After teaching in China for some years, he’s now returning to the US and his parting shot is a blogpost titled Balding Out. Snippet:

“I rationalize the silent contempt for the existing rules and laws within China as people not respecting the method for creating and establishing the rules and laws. Rather than confronting the system, a superior, or try good faith attempts to change something, they choose a type of quiet subversion by just ignoring the rule or law. This quickly spreads to virtually every facet of behavior as everything can be rationalized in a myriad of ways.

Before coming to China, I had this idea that China was rigid which in some ways it is, but in reality it is brutally chaotic because there are no rules it is the pure rule of the jungle with unconstrained might imposing their will and all others ignoring laws to behave as they see fit with no sense of morality or respect for right.”

For cossetted fans of communism, such as the Guardian columnist Owen Jones, China may offer a more appealing ideology than the one that nurtured Lincoln and Ford, Rosa Parks and Jimi Hendrix, but one suspects that he’d tire very quickly of typing about the glories of the Belt and Road Initiative for the People’s Daily.

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Tomorrow, here, the eight post of pre-Christmas 2018, which is all about a warning the great JG Ballard issued regarding the fanaticism of the political correctness brigade.


The capital of Oceania is Beijing

Wednesday, 21 November, 2018

In George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, which was published in 1949, Great Britain has become a province of a super-state named Oceania. This Oceania is ruled by the “Party”, which employs “Thought Police” to persecute individualism and independent thinking. Now, let us fast-forward to 2018 and our current Oceania:

“The most innovative — and disturbing — of the repressive measures in Xinjiang is the government’s use of high-tech mass surveillance systems. Xinjiang authorities conduct compulsory mass collection of biometric data, such as voice samples and DNA, and use artificial intelligence and big data to identify, profile, and track everyone in Xinjiang. The authorities have envisioned these systems as a series of ‘filters,’ picking out people with certain behavior or characteristics that they believe indicate a threat to the Communist Party’s rule in Xinjiang. These systems have also enabled authorities to implement fine-grained control, subjecting people to differentiated restrictions depending on their perceived levels of ‘trustworthiness.’…

… Inside political education camps, detainees are forced to learn Mandarin Chinese, sing praises of the Chinese Communist Party, and memorize rules applicable primarily to Turkic Muslims. Those outside the camps are required to attend weekly, or even daily, Chinese flag-raising ceremonies, political indoctrination meetings, and at times Mandarin classes. Detainees are told they may not be allowed to leave the camps unless they have learned over 1,000 Chinese characters or are otherwise deemed to have become loyal Chinese subjects; Turkic Muslims living outside are subjected to movement restrictions ranging from house arrest, to being barred from leaving their locales, to being prevented from leaving the country. Inside, people are closely watched by guards and are barred from contacting their families and friends. Those living in their homes are watched by their neighbors, officials, and tech-enabled mass surveillance systems, and are not allowed to contact those in foreign countries.”

That’s an excerpt from “Eradicating Ideological Viruses: China’s Campaign of Repression Against Xinjiang’s Muslims“, published by Human Rights Watch. Without doubt, China is an Evil Empire and it’s intent on destroying Western stability and prosperity through the cruel repression and exploitation of its own people.

China


When Erich Honecker visited Las Vegas

Monday, 19 November, 2018

He didn’t, of course, but the contemporary Chinese historian Qin Hui asks us to imagine what might have happened if the East German tyrant had taken a tour of the Strip and kicked back in the penthouse suite at the Bellagio before playing the slots. Unlike the wily Communist Deng Xiaoping, who led China through far-reaching market-economy reforms, Erich Honecker was as thick as a brick so his wretched regime collapsed in 1989 and was consigned to the dustbin of history. Here’s Qin Hui:

“Imagine that twenty years ago, East Germany had suppressed democratization and kept the Berlin Wall. East Germans had no freedom, low-wages, and low human rights, and there was no policy of on-par conversion of East and West German marks. What if Honecker toured the West, visiting Las Vegas and the Moulin Rouge, discovering that the developed world was great, after which he developed a great interest in market economies, and decided to abandon utopia to make money. He left the politics the same, but changed the economy to be part of West Germany’s. He opened the doors wide to Western capital, demanding in return that the West keep the doors open to accept East German products. He would use authoritarian means to provide the best investment opportunities: whatever piece of land you decide you need he would get it for you; workers had to toe the line and could not protest; if people’s homes were in the way of a business deal he would get rid of them; he could decide on allotment of rights to enterprises, there would be no need to deal with anyone, labor unions and agriculture unions were not allowed, he would reward anyone who came to invest and get rid of anyone who got in the way of investment…What do you think would have happened had that come to pass?

The answer is simple. If the state had insisted, the East German people would have stood for it, and the results might have been completely different from what they are now. Western capital would no longer head for China, or Romania, and West Germany wouldn’t be employing Turkish workers. They would have swarmed into East Germany, and sweatshops would have sprung up all over East Germany, which would have poured tons of cheap commodities onto the Western markets, completely renewing East Germany’s original industries… East Germany would immediately have had an economic miracle, and the ‘deindustrialization’ and high unemployment rates would have appeared in West Germany. With the flight of capital from West Germany, labor would have lost its bargaining power, unions would have declined, welfare would have diminished, and the people’s capitalism, built over more than a century, the ‘social market economy’ and its welfare state, would no longer exist. Of course, East Germany would experience serious social problems, such as inequality, alliances between the state and merchants, rampant corruption, environmental pollution, etc. But if the East Germans could withstand all of this, then what would have happened to West Germany?”

The answer to that final question can be found in “Dilemmas of Twenty-First Century Globalization” at the excellent Reading the China Dream blog.

Between the lines of Qin Hui’s piece is a warning about the clear and present danger posed by China, which pretends to be socialist, but is bent on destroying post-war Western prosperity through the cruel exploitation of its own people. This is the context in which one should read the far-too-favourable New York Times feature “China Rules.”

Note: Since 1992, Qin Hui has played the role of the public intellectual, taking a stand on a range of issues, often in conflict with the official Communist Party line. In December 2015, his best-selling book Zouchu Dizhi (Moving Away from the Imperial Regime), was banned. The work examines how the prospect of constitutional democracy collapsed in early-20th-century China after the country had broken free of the Qing dynasty.


Cold War II: America vs. China

Wednesday, 10 October, 2018

A year ago, the President of Interpol, Meng Hongwei, was the pride of China — local boy done good, sort of thing. Then, while visiting his homeland last week, he vanished. Gone Guy. As far as we know, he’s being held under a new form of detention called liuzhi, or “retention in custody.” Under liuzhi, people can be denied access to legal counsel or families for as long as six months. Within that time frame, the thugs of the National Supervisory Commission will extract the desired confessions. Most in the West are still in denial about the true nature of the so-called “People’s Republic,” but one man has decided to speak up. He’s Mike Pence, the US Vice President.

Mike Pence Announces Cold War II” was the headline on an opinion piece yesterday in the Wall Street Journal by Walter Russell Mead. Snippet:

Imperialism and all reactionaries are all paper tigers, 1965 “The Trump administration’s China policy swam into view, and it’s a humdinger. Vice President Mike Pence gave a guide to the approach in a speech last week at the Hudson Institute (where I am a fellow). Denouncing what he called China’s ‘whole of government’ approach to its rivalry with the U.S., Mr. Pence vowed the Trump administration will respond in kind. He denounced China’s suppression of the Tibetans and Uighurs, its ‘Made in China 2025’ plan for tech dominance, and its ‘debt diplomacy’ through the Belt and Road initiative. The speech sounded like something Ronald Reagan could have delivered against the Soviet Union: Mr. Xi, tear down this wall! Mr. Pence also detailed an integrated, cross-government strategy to counter what the administration considers Chinese military, economic, political and ideological aggression.

In the same week as the vice president’s speech, Navy plans for greatly intensified patrols in and around Chinese-claimed waters in the South China Sea were leaked to the press. Moreover, the recently-entered trilateral U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement was revealed to have a clause discouraging trade agreements between member countries and China. The administration indicated it would seek similar clauses in other trade agreements. Also last week, Congress approved the Build Act, a $60 billion development-financing program designed to counter China’s Belt and Road strategy in Africa and Asia. Finally, the White House issued a report highlighting the danger that foreign-based supply chains pose to U.S. military capabilities in the event they are cut off during a conflict.

Any one of these steps would have rated banner headlines in normal times; in the Age of Trump, all of them together barely registered. But this is a major shift in American foreign policy.”

China is a mortal enemy of democracy and freedom. It’s time for people to shout this from the rooftops.

Imperialism and all reactionaries are all paper tigers, 1965


Will China collapse in 2019?

Sunday, 16 September, 2018

The joys of Quora are limitless. A typical day’s questions can include: “Why do C programmers use short variable names (e.g., ‘sz’ instead of size) when it makes code harder to read?” “Is Finland a real country?” “What is the opposite word for together?” “Why do Italians look European?” And this week’s favourite: “Will China collapse in 2019?”

The question was posed Frank Wang, who describes himself as “Sales at M&B Group (2011-present)”. His answer is more illuminating, and disturbing, than many an Economist article:

As a Chinese I want to say something here (please ignore any grammatical mistakes I may have made, Chinese is my mother language ^^)

The title of this question has raised my thoughts on blood and tears wiped by my poor compatriots during the development of China. I will put it like this: “Will it do the world any good if China really collapses?”

I’m working at an export company in China. We export shoes all around the world. The profit is low and the incomes of the workers in the factory are even lower. As some of you may already know: “this shit is from China! OMG. China makes all this shitty stuff and sells it to us.” Ok. Frankly speaking we do sell pretty well. Imagine one day we don’t make the cheap stuff and what will happen. I’m pretty sure the price of all your daily necessities will increase to a level you could never image at this moment. Why? Because China provides the largest amount of cheap products in the world.

Are we willing to be the biggest provider of cheap products in the world? Definitely not. The fact is, the percentage of people who are not well educated in China is still very big, both young and old, mainly people from the less developed areas. What can they do for a living? We provide jobs for them to work in the factories. The income is not much but enough for them to raise a family, to feed their kids and to afford to send them to school.

If China really collapsed, they will lose their way of living, they will become homeless and in the worst scenario become a criminal, and Chinese society will become a mess.

You ask how this will influence my life here in my country? Please look at what happened in some countries around the Mediterranean Sea. The refugees from those countries have already influenced European societies, and they will certainly do anything to survive. Remember the populations of these countries are not even close to the population of one single province in China.

So, if China collapsed, the first thing that will happen to you will be the price increase of your T-shirts and slippers. Then you may read in the news one day that some Chinese refugees broke into some random houses for food…by then China will literally become the biggest supplier of “shitty stuff.”

Alright, I just finished a business trip in Shanghai and I feel a little bit tired. But I hope I have made myself clear and please forgive my poor expression of my thoughts. Never good at it.

Cheers!

Frank in Hefei

Frank’s answer has had 89.8k views and it’s been upvoted 524 times. Deservedly so.


China: The brutal and corrupt hegemon

Monday, 23 July, 2018

Nothing seems to delight a certain section of the chattering class more than the vision of China replacing America as the global hegemon. Out with jeans, peanut butter and bourbon and in with…? Exactly. What will China offer its admirers in Brussels and Silicon Valley: vast markets, cheap labour, re-engineered IP? Beijing offers all these and more and the more includes “a complete and utter lack of respect for the individual or person in China.”

Says who? Says Christopher Balding, an associate professor of business and economics at the HSBC Business School in Shenzhen and author of Sovereign Wealth Funds: The New Intersection of Money and Power. After teaching in China for some years, he’s now returning to the US and his parting shot is a blogpost titled Balding Out. Snippet:

“I rationalize the silent contempt for the existing rules and laws within China as people not respecting the method for creating and establishing the rules and laws. Rather than confronting the system, a superior, or try good faith attempts to change something, they choose a type of quiet subversion by just ignoring the rule or law. This quickly spreads to virtually every facet of behavior as everything can be rationalized in a myriad of ways.

Before coming to China, I had this idea that China was rigid which in some ways it is, but in reality it is brutally chaotic because there are no rules it is the pure rule of the jungle with unconstrained might imposing their will and all others ignoring laws to behave as they see fit with no sense of morality or respect for right.”

For cossetted fans of communism, such as the Guardian columnist Owen Jones, China may offer a more appealing ideology than the one that nurtured Lincoln and Ford, Rosa Parks and Jimi Hendrix, but one suspects that he’d tire very quickly of typing about the glories of the Belt and Road Initiative for the People’s Daily.