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Microsoft

Bill Gates recalls Paul Allen

Thursday, 18 October, 2018

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen died on Monday at the age of 65 of complications from a form of cancer known as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Bill Gates remembers his schoolmate, friend and business partner in a blog post titled “What I loved about Paul Allen.” Snippet:

Paul foresaw that computers would change the world. Even in high school, before any of us knew what a personal computer was, he was predicting that computer chips would get super-powerful and would eventually give rise to a whole new industry. That insight of his was the cornerstone of everything we did together.

In fact, Microsoft would never have happened without Paul. In December 1974, he and I were both living in the Boston area — he was working, and I was going to college. One day he came and got me, insisting that I rush over to a nearby newsstand with him. When we arrived, he showed me the cover of the January issue of Popular Electronics. It featured a new computer called the Altair 8800, which ran on a powerful new chip. Paul looked at me and said: “This is happening without us!” That moment marked the end of my college career and the beginning of our new company, Microsoft. It happened because of Paul.

Paul Allen made our world a better place and during his lifetime and he gave more than $2 billion towards the advancement of science, technology, education, wildlife conservation and the arts. RIP.

Bill Gates and  Paul Allen


Quote of the Day

Tuesday, 18 September, 2018

“More fiction is written in Excel than in Word.” — Troy Vosseller


Auden in a time of public shaming

Sunday, 21 February, 2016 0 Comments

On this day in 1907, the poet Wystan Hugh Auden was born. Alexander McCall Smith, author of What WH Auden Can Do For You, describes him as an astonishingly versatile lyricist who “wrote about rocks, about love, about psychoanalysis, about the bacteria that live on our skin, about war and about cooking. In the Thirties he was a political poet; after going to America he re-embraced Christianity. In his later years he became positively Horatian in his tastes, preaching the virtues of the domestic life and simple pleasures.” Auden is kaleidoscopic and timeless; At Last the Secret is Out is the proof.

    Background: The British writer/actor Stephen Fry made headlines earlier this week with a joke about his friend, costume designer Jenny Beavan. Following Beavan’s appearance at the BAFTA film awards, Fry said, “Only one of the great cinematic costume designers would come to the awards ceremony dressed like a bag lady.” Furious accusations of misogyny followed and, appalled by the humourlessness of the PC mob, Fry quit Twitter.

Jon Ronson explores this kind of public humiliation in So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed, a book about reputation in an era of hysteria and recreational rage. The flames of shame are fanned today on social media but this is just an amplification of what was common in Auden’s time because “there is always a wicked secret” and it will out.

At Last the Secret is Out

At last the secret is out,
as it always must come in the end,
the delicious story is ripe to tell
to tell to the intimate friend;
over the tea-cups and into the square
the tongue has its desire;
still waters run deep, my dear,
there’s never smoke without fire.

Behind the corpse in the reservoir,
behind the ghost on the links,
behind the lady who dances
and the man who madly drinks,
under the look of fatigue
the attack of migraine and the sigh
there is always another story,
there is more than meets the eye.

For the clear voice suddenly singing,
high up in the convent wall,
the scent of the elder bushes,
the sporting prints in the hall,
the croquet matches in summer,
the handshake, the cough, the kiss,
there is always a wicked secret,
a private reason for this.

W. H. Auden (1907 – 1973)

WH Auden


Farewell, then, Nokia

Tuesday, 3 September, 2013 0 Comments

At the height of the NSA hysteria, the usual suspects reheated their arguments for a “European Google”, which would, somehow, save us from the big, bad Americans. Nobody fell for it, though, as everyone knows that the “European Google” idea/scam is predicated on sucking billions of euros into “research” in France and Germany, which will never produce a search engine, never mind a European Google. Now that Microsoft has acquired Nokia’s devices and services business, we can expect demands for a European phone maker. But that train has finally left the Finland station and it’s not coming back.

The year Apple launched the iPhone, 2007, was Nokia’s best-ever year: it sold 436 million handsets — nearly 40 percent of the total purchased worldwide. (Its nearest competitor, Motorola, sold 164 million.) That was then. In the first quarter of this year, Nokia shipped 61.9 million handsets, but Samsung shipped 112.8 million and is on track to reach the 500-million milestone. Poor old Motorola shifted a mere 3.9 million units in Q1 2013.

In April last year, Nokia introduced the Lumia 900, which prompted Nicholas Thompson, writing in the New Yorker, to speculate on “The Resurrection Of Nokia?” He declared: “The cell-phone market could use another competitor. It probably won’t be Research in Motion, which appears set on hara-kiri. But Nokia and Microsoft are genuinely trying to recapture the magic of that old N95.” Strike Nokia there. It’s all Microsoft now.

In early 2001, Rainy Day became the proud owner of a vivid red Nokia 3330 and it fended off all competitors until Steve Jobs reimagined the phone business. No one today can say that Nokia didn’t have fair warning of its fate.

Nokia to Apple


Microsoft does text-to-speech with a twist in China

Tuesday, 13 November, 2012 0 Comments

It’s one thing to convert spoken English into Mandarin text, but to output that written Mandarin as speech in the vocal style of the original speaker is something very new. Yet that’s what happened when Microsoft’s Chief Research Officer Rick Rashid spoke in China at the end of last month. At the 7.35 mark in […]

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The journey from DOS to Windows 8

Wednesday, 31 October, 2012 0 Comments

For the first time since 2001, personal computer sales are projected to fall this year. This means that all eyes are now on Windows 8 with its emphasis on touchscreen input and a grid of dynamically updating tiles that represent apps. Can it produce the kind of bounce that the ailing PC business needs coming […]

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Taking the Microsoft Surface Tablet apart

Monday, 25 June, 2012

Danny Sullivan is devastatingly dismissive of the Redmond presentation in “Hands-Off: Microsoft Surface Tablet Review“: “Nice trick? No, you know what’s a nice trick? Bringing out devices that no one can actually use. I know they work. I could see that one of the Microsoft guys was all logged into his. But why not let […]

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