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Photos

Metamorphosis: The butterfly effect

Wednesday, 22 May, 2019

Our image today is by Dublin photographer Willie Poole, who captured this composite of nature in all its beauty. The butterfly is a well-known symbol for life after death because of its metamorphosis from an ambling caterpillar to an almost ethereal flying creature. This symbolism is of great personal meaning to Willie Poole in these days.

Butterfly by Willie Poole

“How does one become butterfly?’ Pooh asked pensively.
‘You must want to fly so much that you are willing to give up being a caterpillar,’ Piglet replied.
‘You mean to die?’ asked Pooh.
‘Yes and no,’ he answered. ‘What looks like you will die, but what’s really you will live on.” — A.A. Milne


Smell the sea, and feel the sky

Friday, 17 May, 2019

I must down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide
Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied;
And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,
And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.

John Masefield, Sea Fever

Yohan Terraza

Image: The French photographer Yohan Terraza was born in 1980 in Bordeaux. His style of landscape photography is influenced by romantic painters such as J. M. W. Turner.


The richness of the rain

Tuesday, 14 May, 2019

“I’m a London based photographer specialising in street photography and social documentary photography,” says Joshua K. Jackson. “I’m best known for using a bold palette to help illustrate the vibrancy of life in Central London, whilst also exploring themes of diversity and disparity. My work often enters into abstraction and presents the viewer with an unfamiliar view of a familiar city.”

Jackson’s photos of rain are tactile. One can feel the clouds breaking apart and falling.

Rain


Pink for a shovel

Friday, 26 April, 2019

Since the early 19th century, the colour pink has been used as a gender signifier.

Shovel


Paolo Di Paolo’s unseen images

Thursday, 11 April, 2019

Writing in the British Journal of Photography, Marigold Warner says: “Around 20 years ago, while rooting through her father’s cellar in search for a pair of skis, Silvia Di Paolo found a trunk containing 250,000 negatives, prints and slides. Aged 20 at the time, she had no idea that her father, Paolo Di Paolo, had been a photographer — let alone the top contributor to Il Mondo, one of Italy’s most popular current affairs magazines.”

The exhibition Di Paolo. Mondo Perduto will run at the MAXXI National Museum of 21st Century Arts in Rome, from 17 April to 30 June. It is curated by Giovanna Calvenzi.

Paolo Di Paolo took some memorable photos of the stars of his day: Oriana Fallaci, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Charlotte Rampling, Sofia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni, for example. This one of the actress Gina Lollogrigida and the artist Giorgio De Chirico is a classic.

Gina Lollogrigida Giorgio De Chirico


Annie Leibovitz fawns over a famous person

Thursday, 28 March, 2019

Yes, the obsequiousness is breathtaking, but Annie Leibovitz is not shy when it comes to putting her cards on the table, especially when she’s dealing with the man who has parlayed his fame into “cable-news ubiquity and a potential 2020 presidential run,” according to Vogue.

“I met him at the rally the next day, and was pretty much with their group through all of that. And we met again the next morning and did the cover. He was by himself. He didn’t have anyone there. I always admire that too. I was in a quandary about whether he should wear a blue shirt or something more relaxed. So when we went out there, I said, ‘Listen, if you’re going to run, wear the blue shirt. If you’re not going to run, let’s wear something else.’ And he said, ‘Let’s put on the blue shirt.'”

Michael Avenatti


Seen on the street in NYC

Tuesday, 19 March, 2019

By the Rainy Day sister. A sign of our insomniac times, definitely.

New York City


Riyadh Entrepreneurs

Friday, 1 March, 2019

The image titled “Riyadh Entrepreneurs” is by Nyree Cox, an Australian photographer who’s been living in Saudi Arabia since 2015. Her snap was a National Awards Winner in the 2019 Sony World Photography Awards competition.

Riyadh Entrepreneurs

“The 10 Open category winners will now go on to compete for the Open Photographer of the Year, winning $5,000 (USD). This photographer, along with the Professional categories’ winners, will be announced at an Awards’ ceremony in London on 17 April 2019.”


Venice goes there. Is Barcelona next?

Wednesday, 27 February, 2019

We’re talking about an entry fee for day tourists entering the lagoon city. Initial plans aim at charging them €3 ($4.75) for a single-day trip from May. In the coming year the fee would double and can be raised to as much as €10 ($15.83) on heavy tourism days.

In 2016, heritage group Italia Nostra estimated that 30 million people visit Venice every year, with a daily influx of more than 82,000. Under the entry fee scheme, visitors staying in hostels will be exempt from the payment, while hotel guests already have to pay a local tax for their stay.

Will Barcelona follow? The city has been groaning under the weight of “over-tourism” for years now and the pressure is on the municipal authorities to reduce the flow or turn into a revenue source that be deployed to deal with the problem. Talking of Barcelona, Márton Mogyorósy takes an overhead view of the city and his photos only confirm why the world wants to go there. Says Mogyorósy, somewhat cryptically:

“A series of aerial photographs from the capital of Catalonia, which captures the city’s abstract and architectural wonders from a bird’s eye view. As the former fishermen’s quarter which is characterized by its narrow and lively streets. As well as one of Barcelona’s lesser-known masterpiece, Ricardo Bofill’s utopian vision for social living that found form in the cubist heights and halls of Walden 7.”

Barca

Barcelona


I Have Started To Say

Thursday, 7 February, 2019

Happy Birthday today to Barry O’Brien, who was around nine when he was included in the photo below. It prompts thoughts of I Have Started To Say by the great Philip Larkin.

I Have Started To Say

I have started to say
“A quarter of a century”
Or “thirty years back”
About my own life.

It makes me breathless
It’s like falling and recovering
In huge gesturing loops
Through an empty sky.

All that’s left to happen
Is some deaths (my own included).
Their order, and their manner,
Remain to be learnt.

Philip Larkin (1922 – 1985)

Barry


Blue Monday

Monday, 28 January, 2019

Jan Erik Waider devotes himself to “Atmospheric landscape photography of the North; Norway, Iceland, Greenland and beyond.” He titles his collected works Northlandscapes and he captures their cold and damp, chillingly, beautifully.

Blue Monday