Wine

Wine work

Friday, 13 April, 2018 0 Comments

It was a pleasure to work with the excellent English photographer Sam Chick on a story for SevenC3 about Michael and Wulf Unger, who store some of the world’s finest wines deep, literally, in Bavaria. The brothers use the best of old and new technologies to protect the treasures their clients have saved for the rainy day or the winter’s evening. And, of course, if these assets must be liquidated, that Chateau Petrus can be yours for just €3,800 a bottle.

Unger Wein


Walking 1

Thursday, 25 May, 2017 0 Comments

The American naturalist and philosopher Henry David Thoreau, author of such classics as Walden, was also a walker. His most famous essay, Walking, which celebrates the virtues of immersing oneself in nature, was published in May 1862 following his death from tuberculosis. It’s our guide for the next 10 days or so.

“I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking, that is, of taking walks — who had a genius, so to speak, for sauntering, which word is beautifully derived ‘from idle people who roved about the country, in the Middle Ages, and asked charity, under pretense of going a la SainteTerre,’ to the Holy Land, till the children exclaimed, ‘There goes aSainte-Terrer,’ a Saunterer, a Holy-Lander.

They who never go to the Holy Land in their walks, as they pretend, are indeed mere idlers and vagabonds; but they who do go there are saunterers in the good sense, such as I mean. Some, however, would derive the word from sans terre without land or a home, which, therefore, in the good sense, will mean, having no particular home, but equally at home everywhere. For this is the secret of successful sauntering. He who sits still in a house all the time may be the greatest vagrant of all; but the saunterer, in the good sense, is no more vagrant than the meandering river, which is all the while sedulously seeking the shortest course to the sea.”

Walking


The Nose goes digital and pivots to Asia

Friday, 28 December, 2012 0 Comments

Back in December 2000, William Langewiesche wrote a superb portrait of Robert Parker, the man who revolutionized the world of wine, for The Atlantic titled The Million-Dollar Nose. Snippet: “The Wine Advocate has 40,000 subscribers, in every U.S. state and thirty-seven foreign countries. These are influential readers, and they pass the issues around, igniting the […]

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Bukowski on women

Thursday, 27 December, 2012 0 Comments

Among the myriad delights that Santa Claus put in the Rainy Day Christmas stocking was Women by Charles Bukowski. In his introduction, Barry Miles says, “Women is Buwkoski’s punk novel. Written in 1977, it is fast, conversational, uses few long words, and just zips along.” In the book, we meet Henry Chinaski, a low-life writer […]

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The Botanist: Gin from… Scotland

Thursday, 24 May, 2012

New in the Rainy Day drinks cabinet is the latest creation from the island of Islay, a dry gin called “The Botanist“. The aroma is classically gin floral but with a Hebridean character that evokes hazy hills, bogs, turf and Atlantic surf. Upon sipping, The Botanist reveals itself as a tonguetaste of purity, a mouthfeel […]

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Side by side: John Lynch & John Talbot

Sunday, 4 March, 2012

John Lynch emigrated from Ireland to France in 1691 and his son Thomas founded the Château Lynch-Bages winery in Bordeaux in 1749. Some 200 years later, Jean-Charles Cazes bought the estate and it’s been owned and run by the Cazes family since then. Sir John Talbot, Governor of Aquitaine and Earl of Shrewsbury, acquired what […]

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