Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Google Plus Connect on Flickr

World Cup

Kicking off the World Cup with an exoskeleton

Thursday, 12 June, 2014 0 Comments

This evening in Sao Paulo, a paralyzed teenager wearing an exoskeleton will walk onto a football field and kick a ball to ceremonially mark the beginning of the World Cup. The technology has been developed the Walk Again project, which is run by a group of scientists and engineers drawn from research institutes throughout the world — the Duke University Center for Neuroengineering, the Technical University of Munich, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, the University of California, Davis, the University of Kentucky, and the Duke immersive Virtual Environment — and led by the Brazilian neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis.

The goal is a brain-machine interface controlled by a person’s thoughts. The vision is of a world without wheelchairs in which the quality of life for the disabled would grow dramatically. Let the World Cup begin!

World Cup kick off


Gli Azzurri and Il Canto degli Italiani

Wednesday, 11 June, 2014 0 Comments

Marco Verratti, Andrea Pirlo, Mario Balotelli, Gigi Buffon, Lorenzo Insigne… Italy fans work the national squad into the lyrics of the country’s national anthem: Il Canto degli Italiani. Next stop: The Arena da Amazonia in Manaus.


The algorithm and the Three Lions

Tuesday, 10 June, 2014 0 Comments

FiveThirtyEight has launched an interactive thingy that calculates every team’s chances of advancing past the group stage in the World Cup and eventually winning the trophy. The forecasts are based on the Soccer Power Index (SPI), an algorithm Nate Silver developed in conjunction with ESPN. For England, SPI predicts unrosy tournament prospects:

“Betting markets see England, Italy and Uruguay as about equally likely to advance while Costa Rica is in a distant fourth place. SPI, by contrast, has England and Uruguay ahead of Italy and views the group as middling enough that Costa Rica could pull off a huge upset…

…It also might not matter much in the end. England, Italy and Uruguay are the sort of teams that might be able to entertain championship dreams in a World Cup with more parity, but not in one where they would have to overcome Brazil, Argentina, Germany or Spain at some point.”

Group D


The World Cup of Everything Else

Monday, 9 June, 2014 0 Comments

Most Nobel Prizes Per Capita: Switzerland. Biggest Drinkers: Russia. Most Women in Government: Costa Rica. Most Protestants: Ghana. The World Cup of Everything Else created by the Wall Street Journal is excellent pre-tournament data journalism.

The World Cup of Everything Else


Follow the bouncing ball

Saturday, 7 June, 2014 0 Comments

The World Cup kicks off next week so now’s the time to get into the mood. We’re getting an assist today from Guillaume Blanchet, a French filmmaker based in Montreal.


The unsavoury World Cup runneth over

Monday, 2 June, 2014 0 Comments

The ongoing debate about the holding of the World Cup in Brazil, a country challenged by poverty, inequality and crime, has moved to the back pages following the weekend’s revelations about the costs of staging the event in Qatar in 2022. These costs are not just measured in infrastructural expenditures, but in lives lost and destroyed and rampant sleaze in the run-up to the awarding of the tournament to the emirate. The alleged corruption is breathtaking:

“The Sunday Times said it had obtained a cache of hundreds of millions of documents and emails, which detailed conversations about payments and money transfers from accounts controlled by Bin Hammam, his family and Doha-based businesses. Among many other alleged payments to mid-ranking football officials and figures including the former footballer of the year George Weah, Bin Hammam paid a total of $1.6m to the disgraced former Fifa vice-president, Jack Warner, including $450,000 before the vote. Warner has always denied any wrongdoing.”

For the past four years, the world has been looking forward to a football festival in Brazil. It could still turn out to be a marvellous spectacle but there’s an uneasy feeling abroad that the game has sold its soul.


Celebrating Brazil with the crowd

Friday, 23 May, 2014 0 Comments

Kieran O’Keeffe describes himself as “A happy Irish designer working and living in London with the super Lynsey Power.” Together, they had the excellent idea of creating a Brazil World Cup wall chart poster that would stand out from the crowd, and with the help of the crowd at Kickstarter, 55 backers pledged £660 to get the job done. Well done!


Brazil is over

Tuesday, 7 January, 2014 0 Comments

For the Arsenal and England forward Theo Walcott, Brazil is very over. He’ll miss the rest of the season and the World Cup with a ruptured knee ligament. And it’s not looking so sunny, either, for the host country. “More than six years later, the outlook for Brazil’s oil industry, much like the Brazilian economy itself, is more sobering. Oil production is stagnant, the state-controlled oil company, Petrobras, is hobbled by debt, and foreign oil companies are wary of investing here.” So reports the Washington Post today in a piece titled “Brazil’s oil euphoria hits reality hard.”

And the Wall Street Journal piles it on: “Even Brazil, which has had far more responsible economic management than Venezuela or Argentina, is starting to struggle with rising prices and a boom in credit that is starting to turn. Last year, one Brazilian summed up the Atlantic bloc harshly: ‘Brazil is becoming Argentina, Argentina is becoming Venezuela, and Venezuela is becoming Zimbabwe.'”

Everything that seemed to be going so brilliantly for Brazil has started to go sour of late. The preparations for the World Cup have been marred by delays, deaths, and demonstrations against the diversion of resources from social spending to football stadiums and, in the bigger arena, Mexico’s economic revival has checked Brazil’s hopes of leading a renascent Latin America in the global power game. Last year was horrible for all the BRICs but the home of Pele was especially hard-hit. This year, US Fed tightening could spark a run on Brazilian assets. With the hosting of the World Cup and the Olympics, Brasilia dreamed of taking a leading place on the world stage. Now, the swagger is less assured and the talk is filled with the familiar complaints about a big country that never quite lives up to its promise and remains uncertain about its role.

Indicative of the doubt, is Brazil’s attitude to the American data thief, Edward Snowden. He wrote an open letter last month saying that he would assist the Brazilian government in its investigations into NSA spying in exchange for asylum. Publicly, the foreign ministry has hedged, saying it has not received a formal asylum request and therefore isn’t considering it, but it was the risk involved in angering Washington that prevented President Dilma Rousseff’s leftist government from easing Snowden’s passage from the grimness of Putin’s icy realm to the warmth of the Copacabana.

When it came to making the challenge, Brazil blinked. Not a good omen for the Seleção, that, this year.


Do Not Use an Apostrophe to Form a Plural

Tuesday, 27 December, 2011

People of Ireland, listen up: when s is added to a word simply to make it a plural, no apostrophe is used (except in expressions where letters or numerals are treated like words, like “mind your p’s and q’s” and “learn your ABC’s”). Got that?

Continue Reading »