Tag: Apple watch

Stand up!

Monday, 20 April, 2015 0 Comments

The haptic sensor in the Apple Watch sends pulses to remind the owner to stand up every hour, along with a text message. “You’ve been sitting for a while. Take a minute to stand up,” a sample text reads.

“If I sit for too long, it will actually tap me on the wrist to remind me to get up and move, because a lot of doctors think sitting is the new cancer,” says Tim Cook, the Apple CEO. Cancer is a disease; sitting is a behaviour, but the point is taken. So, stand up today and take a walk. The London-based Art&Graft design studio shows how it’s done.


The Apple Watch as worn by John Gruber

Thursday, 9 April, 2015 0 Comments

Joanna Stern has written a detailed review for the Wall Street Journal: “The Apple Watch makes you look good. But the next one is bound to make you look even better.”

Joshua Topolsky offers a thorough tour d’horizon at Bloomberg: “In some ways, it can be more distracting than your iPhone, and checking it can feel more offensive to people around you than pulling out your phone. The watch wants and needs you now, as its insistent taps make painfully clear.”

Nicole Phelps presents a fashionable appreciation for STYLE.COM: “I came to think of it as a filter instead, bringing what’s essential or pleasurable to me closer to me and editing out the rest.”

But for wannabe insiders, the only analysis that matters in the end is the one offered by John Gruber. While the New York Times enthuses “Bliss, but Only After a Steep Learning Curve“, in typical Gruber style, his review is titled simply The Apple Watch. Snippets:

Time telling is where Apple Watch fares worst compared to traditional watches. That was inevitable. The primary purpose of traditional watches is telling time. Apple Watch is a general purpose computing device, for which telling time is an important, but not primary, use.

In short, I think Apple Watch might be a tougher sell to current watch wearers than non-watch wearers. Non-watch wearers have an open wrist, and if they cared about the glance-able convenience of an always-visible watch dial, they would be wearing a traditional watch already. Watch wearers, on the other hand, already have something on their wrist that Apple Watch needs to replace,3 and the reason they already have a watch on their wrist is that they care about telling time at a glance — something Apple Watch is (and only ever will be, I suspect) merely OK at, not great at…

…The quality of Apple Watch simply as an object is meaningful. When you wear something, it matters how it feels, and it matters how you think it looks. And much like with time-telling as a feature, Apple Watch may well appeal more to those who aren’t currently watch wearers than to those who are.

Apple Watch

The Gruber bottom line: “The single most innovative feature of Apple Watch — the most intimate feature of the company’s most personal device — will only matter if some of the people you care most about wear one too.”

Pretty much like the iPhone, then. Peer pressure and status anxiety will drive sales of the Apple Watch. In other words, it’s going to be a huge success.


New York Times reports will consist of a sentence.

Wednesday, 1 April, 2015 0 Comments

Yes, it is April 1st, but this is not a Fool’s Day prank. The New York Times has developed an app to provide news reports for the Apple watch, which will consist of a sentence. “Readers can swipe through these stories and get a quick glance, if they only have a few seconds and want to get caught up,” said Andrew Phelps, a senior product manager at the newspaper.

BTW, he could have saved a word by using “catch up” instead of “get caught up” there.

Wikipedia disapproves: “One sentence does not an article make.” And the NYT should note that the one-sentence discipline is a tough one: “After nine years, I’ve decided to shut down One Sentence,” wrote the proprietor of One Sentence, 3,1932 minutes ago.

Finally, long before the Apple Watch was imagined at 1 Infinite Loop in Cupertino, the Roman poet, Horace, warned: Brevis esse laboro, obscurus fio (“I struggle to be brief, and become obscure.”)

Apple Watch