Tag: art

One of those March days

Sunday, 3 March, 2019

“It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.” — Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

March

The March image above is by the Canadian artist Alex Colville and his paintings were discussed by Ingo F. Walther in Art of the Twentieth Century:

“Colville’s silent images are static. Yet practically all of them tell a story, in a brief, concise plot that does not always have a resolution. Fundamental human situations are their both simple and complex themes: loneliness, isolation, parting, work, leisure, estrangement, love. The only subliminally dramatic, often melancholy laconism of content corresponds to the absolute precision of form by which it is conveyed. Like hardly another artist, Colville maintains the difficult balance between imagination and sober calculation, formal interest and social commitment. Behind the realistic surface of his imagery lurks the surreal — but a surreal that lacks every trace of theatrical staging or borrowing from psychoanalysis, whose new myths Colville deeply mistrusts.”


Roger Scruton on religion and culture

Wednesday, 16 January, 2019

“Culture, I suggest, has a religious root and a religious meaning. This does not mean you have to be religious in order to be cultivated. But it does mean that the point of being cultivated cannot, in the end, be explained without reference to the nature and value of religion.” — Roger Scruton

Saint Matthew was one of the twelve apostles and one of the four Evangelists. He was a tax collector by profession and when Jesus found him sitting with the other tax collectors he said, “Follow me,” and Matthew got up and followed him. “The Calling of St Matthew” by Caravaggio depicts this moment. Painting from life, Caravaggio developed a technique called Tenebrism, which was marked by dramatic contrasts of light and shade. This led him to create art of great emotional intensity. “The Calling of St Matthew” was a sensation when it was first displayed in San Luigi dei Francesi in Rome and it remains one of the most famous of Caravaggio’s works.

Caravaggio


Biro drawing of David Bowie

Saturday, 8 December, 2018

This Bic biro drawing of David Bowie is by the amazing Mark Powell, formerly of Yorkshire and now of Brick Lane in East London. Why a biro? “I choose a biro because it is the most simple and readily available tool to hand. I want to show how easy it is to have the chance to create. I want it to inspire people to give it a go without feeling the need to spend money on arts and crafts.”

Biro Bowie


The milk of life

Tuesday, 9 October, 2018

My mother milked cows by hand and emptied countless buckets of their milk into churns that were then taken by my father to the local branch creamery of the Dairy Disposal Company, which was the name the nascent Free State had given to the Condensed Milk Company of Ireland. For both my parents, milk was more than a product. It was life.

Johannes Vermeer painted The Milkmaid around 1660 and it’s one of the most brilliant of his 34 brilliant works that still exist today. As the Rijksmuseum puts it:

“A maidservant pours milk, entirely absorbed in her work. Except for the stream of milk, everything else is still. Vermeer took this simple everyday activity and made it the subject of an impressive painting — the woman stands like a statue in the brightly lit room. Vermeer also had an eye for how light by means of hundreds of colourful dots that play over the surface of objects.”

The Milkmaid


Shark Day

Thursday, 12 July, 2018

Kazuki Okuda is an illustrator and “2D artist” based in Kyoto. An impressive array of his work can be found on the showcase site Behance, which is owned by Adobe.

Shark


The Right Banksy

Friday, 23 June, 2017 0 Comments

“The day I came to love Donald Trump was when I saw how hard he was kicking liberals in the teeth,” so says Sabo, the “unsavory agent” who has taken to “appropriating” the propaganda formats of the left for his own purposes. “I am on the edge, the only true rebel artist in LA.,” he declares. With his hilarious posters, the ex-marine has targeted Katy Perry, Jon Stewart, Madonna, Lady Gaga, J.J. Abrams and many other anti-Trump “artists”. As he told The Guardian: “I cater to the street urchins, the young people. I want them to understand that there’s another message out there.”

Sabo Trump


Unboxing a book of Vermeer

Saturday, 25 March, 2017 0 Comments

The trend of making videos of the unpacking of a newly-purchased box containing a desirable gadget has given dictionary makers the word “unboxing.” Example: “Did you see Juan’s unboxing of the new super-thin Asus ZenBook UX305?”

A book can be unboxed, too. Here, Vermeer — The Complete Works by Taschen, the art book publisher based in Cologne, is unboxed by Annie Quigley, owner of Bibliophile.

Johannes Vermeer (1632–1675) painted during that extraordinary period of exploration, trade and creativity that occurred during the Dutch Golden Age in the seventeenth century. The modern eye is tempted to compare his works to photographs, but deeper observation reveals far more. His paintings are, in fact, exquisitely designed compositions of light and shadow, colour, contours and shapes.


Ash Wednesday

Wednesday, 1 March, 2017 0 Comments

“In Young Mother, the ash is used to portray anonymous woman, her humble and demur demeanour is reminiscent of depictions of the Madonna.” — Zhang Huan

A founding member of Beijing’s conceptual artists movement in the 1990s, Zhang Huan moved to New York in 1998 and developed a unique style that mixed East and West. Upon returning to China a decade later, he had an epiphany, which he described as the “magic” of prayer and the power of the incense ashes. For him, ash has a metaphoric connection to memory, the soul and the spiritual. “Everything we are, everything we believe and want are within these ashes,” says Zhang Huan.

Your mother


In His Own Words: Bob Dylan paints

Sunday, 13 November, 2016 0 Comments

“I believe that the key to the future is in the remnants of the past. That you have to master the idioms of your own time before you can have any identity in the present tense.” So writes Bob Dylan, the recent Nobel laureate in Literature, in the introduction to Bob Dylan, The Beaten Path, an exhibition of his landscapes at the Halcyon Gallery in London. The exhibition is on view until Sunday, 11 December.

Bob Dylan


The human heart and face

Friday, 12 August, 2016 0 Comments

On this day in 1827, William Blake died. The English poet, painter, printmaker and visionary was largely unrecognised during his lifetime, but is now considered a pivotal figure in the arts of the Romantic Age. When he was 14, his family decided that he would be apprenticed to an engraver, so his father took him to William Ryland, a highly respected master of the trade. The boy, however, resisted the arrangement telling his father, “I do not like the man’s face: it looks as if he will live to be hanged!” The grim prophecy came true 12 years later.

William Blake’s uncanny ability to expose the face that lies behind the mask resulted in some revealing and enduring paintings and poetry.

A Divine Image

Cruelty has a Human Heart
And Jealousy a Human Face
Terror the Human Form Divine
And Secrecy, the Human Dress

The Human Dress, is forged Iron
The Human Form, a fiery Forge.
The Human Face, a Furnace seal’d
The Human Heart, its hungry Gorge.

William Blake (1757 – 1827)

William Blake - Nebuchadnezzar

William Blake’s Nebuchadnezzar is a print portraying the Old Testament Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II. The story of Nebuchadnezzar tells of a ruler who through hubris lost his mind and was reduced to madness and eating “grass as oxen.”


The art and aristry of Muhammad Ali

Saturday, 4 June, 2016 0 Comments

“I’m the greatest, I’m a bad man, and I’m pretty!” — Muhammad Ali

The April 1968 Esquire cover of Muhammad Ali posing as the martyr Saint Sebastian was one of the most iconic images of the Sixties, combining the provocative issues of race, religion and war. This is one of the greatest magazine covers ever because it illustrates the boxer’s persecution for his beliefs in a way that is visually elegant and economical.

Ali Esquire

Muhammad Ali was born Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. on 17 January 1942. He died yesterday, 3 June 2016. He was The Greatest Of All Time.