Tag: Brazil

RIP: The Banks of England

Tuesday, 12 February, 2019

The great Gordon Banks, a World Cup winner with England in 1966 whose plunging, swiveling save to deny Brazil’s Pelé in the 1970 World Cup is remembered as one of the greatest moments of goalkeeping, has died aged 81. RIP.

“Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them.” — William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night


Bolsonaro Wins Big In Brazil

Monday, 29 October, 2018

How can we explain Jair Bolsonaro? Simply put, he represents a desire for radical change. Given the inability of political systems unable to provide it, radical change will increasingly come from outside the political system and be directed against it. It’s happened in the USA; it’s happened in Italy and it’s happening in Germany.

Richard Fernandez nails it: “Events like this pose a real intellectual challenge for the Third Way crowd. It can’t just be Trump that’s causing this, can it? There must be some unacknowledged problem with the old global world that is driving this. Whether you are for or against the obvious revolt, perhaps more urgently if you are against it, there is the necessity to understand the causes of the crisis beyond the explanations offered by late night comedians.”

The MSM is at a loss to understand what’s happening and is unwilling to face the facts. The BBC is typical, and seems to think that the its totemic labels like “far right”, “fascist” and “racist” will return things to the status quo ante. But the spell has been broken. It doesn’t work anymore. Sure, some members of the elite may sense that Trump and Bolsonaro and Salvini are symptoms, not a cause, but they refuse to admit that each one is a symptom of their own abject failures.


And then there were eight

Friday, 6 July, 2018

What began on 14 June with 32 teams is nearing its end on 15 July, but before we get to the World Cup Final the quarter finals have to be sorted and they begin today and finish tomorrow. The candidates are Uruguay, France, Brazil, Belgium, Sweden, England, Russia and Croatia.

Part of the fun of the World Cup is making predictions, so here goes:

Uruguay vs. France, Nizhny Novgorod. Referee: Néstor Pitana (Argentina). According to the latest reports, Edinson Cavani, Uruguay’s star striker, is probably out of this evening’s game due to injury. If true, it’s a massive blow to the South Americans and his absence would tilt the scales further towards France, who can depend upon Mbappé to run Godín ragged. France, however, are more show than substance at times so it will be interesting to see how they’ll cope with the physical “toughness” (dirt) they’re going to encounter today. Verdict: France by a metre.

Brazil vs. Belgium, Kazan. Referee: Milorad Mažić (Serbia). With Belgium, we were promised another “golden generation” that was going to knock the socks off every team that dared stand in its way. And what happened against Japan? A Belgian winner in the last minute. Brazil, on the other hand, have changed their ways since that 7-1 hammering by Germany in 2014 and they’re one of the most efficient teams in the tournament. Neymar adds that extra element of Brazilian eccentricity, even if it’s mostly gaudy, but he’s usually good for a goal. Verdict: Brazil by a mile.

Tomorrow, the second group of quarter finalists.

France 1998


Cymru am byth

Saturday, 2 July, 2016 0 Comments

The last time Wales were in a major football tournament was 1958, when they lost 1–0 in a quarter final to Brazil — thanks to a first-ever World Cup goal by a youngster named Pelé. He scored two more in the final, when Brazil beat the hosts, Sweden, 5–2. Fast forward to 2016 and Wales have reached the semi-finals of the European Championship after beating the hot favourites Belgium, 3–1, last night.

Aaron Ramsey was simply magnificent for Wales and the heart-breaking footnote to last night’s heroics is that he will miss Wednesday’s semi-final against Portugal in Lyon through suspension. He was rather harshly booked for handball, a silly foul.

Note: Cymru am byth means Wales forever, or long live Wales.

Wales


Pelé in Tribeca

Friday, 22 April, 2016 0 Comments

Highlight of tomorrow’s Tribeca Film Festival will be the screening of Pelé: Birth of a Legend, a biopic about the rise of the great footballer, who led Brazil to three World Cup wins. It is written and directed by Jeff and Michael Zimbalist, who made The Two Escobars, a superb film about the Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar and the Colombian footballer Andres Escobar. Jeff Zimblast also co-directed Favela Rising, which focuses on the work of Anderson Sá, a former drug trafficker who established the AfroReggae movement in one of Rio de Janeiro’s worst slums, Vigario Geral.


Dilma & Hillary, Thelma & Louise

Friday, 22 April, 2016 0 Comments

Zanny Minton Beddoes, Editor-in-Chief of the Economist, is offering readers two covers this week. Latin America gets “The great betrayal,” which is about the economic crisis in Brazil and the upcoming impeachment of its president, Dilma Rousseff. The country is in a state of despair as it fights its worst recession since the 1930s, and the real should stop at Ms Rousseff’s desk, but the Economist is magnanimous: “The failure is not only of Ms Rousseff’s making. The entire political class has let the country down through a mix of negligence and corruption.”

For the rest of the world, the Economist cover features Hillary Clinton. “Could she fix it?” America, that is. It’s a lukewarm leader, peppered with reservations such as “Mrs Clinton’s solutions too often seem feeble,” and “her policies are fiddly.” As she rolls up her sleeves to retune the USA’s rusty engine, the lack of enthusiasm is startling: “Yet, rather than thrilling to the promise of taking the White House or of electing America’s first woman president, many Democrats seem joyless.”

The Economist Latin America The Economist Clinton

It’s been 25 years since Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis hit the highway in Thelma & Louise, Ridley Scott’s road movie that put women in the driver’s seat, finally. The film kept them at the wheel all the way to the vivid end as they flew into the blue yonder above the Grand Canyon in a green Thunderbird convertible. In Paste Monthly, Amanda Schurr remains transformed by it all. Snippet:

“… their flight from Oklahoma to Mexico is urgent, telling and inimitably American. Leave it to Ridley Scott, taking visual inspiration from Terrence Malick’s Badlands, and the sweeping flyovers of fellow Brit cinematographer Adrian Biddle to capture the promise and danger of the scorched West — the film was shot largely in California and Utah, and it’s never looked more stunning, nor strangely unsentimental and unforgiving.”

A bit like the electorates in Brazil and the USA, “unsentimental and unforgiving.”


The ruin of Marina Diamandis

Saturday, 28 March, 2015 0 Comments

It’s going to be loud at the Autódromo de Interlagos in São Paulo tonight, but instead of the usual revving of F1 engines, there’ll be music. Lollapalooza Brasil promises two days of great sounds with a lineup that includes Pharrell Williams, Skrillex, Jack White, Interpol and Marina and the Diamonds. The Welsh singer is promoting her third album, Froot, and from it here’s I’m a Ruin, which was directed by Marcus Lundqvist and filmed in January on the island of Lanzarote.

There might be a few too many echoes of Kate Bush, Lana Del Rey, Florence and the Machine and Madonna here for some of Marina’s core fans, though. Snippets from the YouTube comments:

Daniel Sanchez Davey: “I love Marina but this video is too similar to Madonna’s Frozen vídeo clip (not a Madonna fan) seriously the oriental black clothing, the desert, fast skies, the hands on the earth. I’m sorry but it looks almost like a copy, just take a look. What happened here Marina? You are always very original.”

Dania Osorio1: “Well, marinas a huge fan of Madonna so I think she hot inspired from that video. Yet you cant really judge on her for making an awesome video its similar but it was marinafied?.”


Cucurucu

Saturday, 6 December, 2014 0 Comments

“In spite of myself, the insidious mastery of song
Betrays me back, till the heart of me weeps to belong
To the old Sunday evenings at home, with winter outside
And hymns in the cosy parlour, the tinkling piano our guide.”

A verse there from The Piano by D.H. Lawrence. The poem served as the inspiration for Cucurucu by Nick Mulvey, and the musical influences were provided by the Santo Daime community of Brazil. The video clip was shot by National Geographic’s James Morgan on Nihiwatu Beach in Indonesia.


Suarez: The chomp

Tuesday, 24 June, 2014 0 Comments


Google’s toothbrush test in Brazil

Tuesday, 17 June, 2014 0 Comments

When Larry Page returned to being Google’s CEO in 2011, he said he wanted to develop more services that people would use at least twice a day, like a toothbrush. Now that football is in the air, so to speak, the search engine giant has launched its Project Loon balloons in Northeast Brazil to connect an isolated school, Linoca Gayoso, to the internet for the first time. Interestingly, the Loon trial is using LTE technologies, which allow Google’s stratospheric balloons to link directly to smartphones and tablets.

It’s all to play for.


Italy 2 : England 1

Sunday, 15 June, 2014 0 Comments

For commentary on the after-match inquest, let’s turn to Britain’s poet laureate Carol Ann Duffy.

The Shirt

Afterwards, I found him alone at the bar
and asked him what went wrong. It’s the shirt,
he said. When I pull it on it hangs on my back

like a shroud, or a poisoned jerkin from Grimm
seeping its curse onto my skin, the worst tattoo.

I shower and shave before I shrug on the shirt,
smell like a dream; but the shirt sours my scent

with the sweat and stink of fear. It’s got my number.
I poured him another shot. Speak on, my son. He did.
I’ve wanted to sport the shirt since I was a kid,

but now when I do it makes me sick, weak, paranoid.

All night above the team hotel, the moon is the ball

in a penalty kick. Tens of thousands of fierce stars

are booing me. A screech owl is the referee.

The wind’s a crowd, forty years long, bawling a filthy song

about my Wag. It’s the bloody shirt! He started to blub
like a big girl’s blouse and I felt a fleeting pity.
Don’t cry, I said, at the end of the day you’ll be back

on 100K a week and playing for City.