Tag: hackers

Open web digital counterinsurgency against ISIS

Friday, 12 February, 2016 0 Comments

“Trolls, Hackers and Extremists — The Fight for a Safe and Open Web” was the title of a discussion yesterday evening at the Munich Security Conference. So far this week, we’ve looked at the trolls and the hackers, and now it’s the turn of the open web. On 18 January, during a discussion at the Royal Institute of International Affairs at Chatham House in London, Jared Cohen, Director, Google Ideas, said the key to stopping ISIS from prospering online is to drive them out of the traditional web, the open, web, which can be indexed by search engines. It will be impossible to stop terrorists from using Tor and the dark web, however, he said.

According to Cohen, ISIS is “not a tech savvy organisation” and it stoops to tactics associated with fraud or spam. Still, there have been reports that it’s started using encrypted chat apps, such as Telegram, and that it has developed its own messaging app that “features news and videos showing executions and battlefield victories.”

Some will argue that there are enough laws on the books already about hate speech, and others would say that Google, which owns YouTube, the preferred platform of ISIS, could do a lot more to withdraw the oxygen of publicity, so there’s no shortage of views. 


Hacking the new world order

Thursday, 11 February, 2016 1 Comment

“Hackers used malware to penetrate the defenses of a Russian regional bank and move the ruble-dollar rate more than 15 percent in minutes.” So begins a recent Bloomberg story about a group of Russian hackers who infected Energobank in Kazan with the Corkow Trojan this time last year and placed more than $500 million in orders.

Hacked This is scary stuff, indeed, and hardly a day goes by now without some similar tale of nefarious hacking making the headlines. A lot of what’s going on is simply opportunistic crime being carried out by thieves equipped with keyboards as opposed to knives, but there’s a global dimension as well and this is what Adam Segal, Director of Cyberspace and Digital Policy at the Council on Foreign Relations, addresses in his forthcoming book, The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age. Snippet:

This new age of spying is more than a national security concern. Since much cyber-espionage targets commercial secrets, it poses a persistent threat to America’s economic strength. Many countries are snooping. The US Office of the National Counterintelligence Executive (ONCIX) names France, Israel, and Russia, among others, as states collecting economic information and technology from American companies. During the 1980s and ’90s, the business class seats on Air France planes were allegedly bugged. While the airline has long denied the allegations, French intelligence officials have been forthright about the strategic importance of industrial espionage. As Pierre Marion, former director of France’s Directorate-General for External Security, said with regard to spying on the US, “In economics, we are competitors, not allies.”

Historians looking for a date on which to pin the start of the Cyber World War might yet settle upon 2009, the year in which the Stuxnet virus was launched into an Iranian nuclear facility. The disclosure of the Sony Pictures hacking scandal in November 2014 is another historical milestone. Both reveal the geopolitical aspect of hacking and its potential impact on security, business and personal data. The Hacked World Order is timely reading and a useful guide to the dangers that lurk along the infobahn.

Note: “Trolls, Hackers and Extremists — The Fight for a Safe and Open Web” is the title of a discussion at the Munich Security Conference this evening.


Twitter vs. trolls vs. terror vs. markets vs. censors

Wednesday, 10 February, 2016 1 Comment

Twitter is going to war with trolls — people who spread hate anonymously on the internet — armed with a Trust & Safety Council, which will draw on the expertise of the Center for Democracy and Technology, EU Kids Online, GLAAD, the National Cyber Security Alliance and 40 other groups and individuals. Statement:

“With hundreds of millions of tweets sent per day, the volume of content on Twitter is massive, which makes it extraordinarily complex to strike the right balance between fighting abuse and speaking truth to power,” Patricia Cartes, head of global policy outreach, wrote in a blog post. “It requires a multi-layered approach where each of our 320 million users has a part to play, as do the community of experts working for safety and free expression.”

By the way, not everyone sees the Twitter Trust and Safety Council as a blessing. It’s a version of Orwell’s Ministry of Truth says Robby Soave at Reason. Quote: “For my part, I would feel more comfortable if the Trust & Safety Council included at least a few principled speech or tech freedom groups, like the Foundation for Individual Rights and the Electronic Frontier Foundation.” And Julie Bindel, perhaps.

To help draw the line between poisonous hate speech that deserves to be blocked and disagreeable free speech worthy of protection, alternative voices must be heard and heeded. “We are in danger of making censorship the standard response to anything that offends,” argues Julie Bindel. “Recent attempts to ban Donald Trump and pick-up artist Roosh V from the UK would have achieved nothing politically constructive.”

Last year, the former Twitter CEO Dick Costolo confessed that “we suck at dealing with abuse and trolls on the platform and we’ve sucked at it for years.” Fighting the trolls is now a priority for the new CEO Jack Dorsey. “Twitter stands for freedom of expression, speaking truth to power, and empowering dialogue. That starts with safety,” he tweeted earlier today. Along with battling trolls, he’s trying to stop terrorist groups using Twitter to recruit followers, and then there’s the tricky business of that plummeting share price.

Security: “Trolls, Hackers and Extremists — The Fight for a Safe and Open Web” is the title of a discussion at the Munich Security Conference on Thursday evening.

Scandinavia: What’s a troll? The origins of this menacing word hark back to Old Norse, which spoke of strange beings that lived in caves and were hostile to humans. Given the Nordic roots of the term, it’s appropriate that the world’s most famous troll trapper, as it were, is the Swedish journalist Robert Aschberg, who has made a name for himself by exposing trolls on his TV show Trolljägarna (Troll Hunter).