Tag: IRA

Sky News distorts the news in favour of the IRA

Saturday, 6 April, 2019

No, it wasn’t a “botched IRA warning call” that killed 21 people in Birmingham in 1974, it was two IRA bombs that brutally ended their lives. That Sky News would put such a fake headline on a story of mass murder is beyond belief. Or is it?

Sky News


The Shamrock Shore before the backstop

Wednesday, 31 October, 2018

How the Irish border backstop became Brexit’s defining issue” was the title on yesterday’s Financial Times Brexit feature by Alex Barker and Arthur Beesley. It’s a vexed matter, the backstop, and it has the potential to do significant harm to all the actors in this drama. Brussels is playing with fire here as it ignores the fact that the UK has long supported open borders with the Republic of Ireland and it continued to allow travel to and from Ireland without a passport, even when IRA terrorists were bombing British cities and murdering shoppers and commuters, police and politicians.

Whether a new border, patrolled on land by French gendarmes or by the German navy in the sea, will be set up in or around the “Shamrock Shore” in case of a “no deal” Brexit remains to be seen, but the issue highlights the never-ending debate about the rights and wrongs in the historic relationship between the islands. The Acts of Union 1800 are a case in point. The loss of the Irish Parliament was greeted with dismay in Dublin and most subsequent disasters were blamed on that pivotal legislation.

All of this was aired in April 1976 when Paul Brady sang a wonderful, unaccompanied version of The Shamrock Shore ballad in the village of Clondra in Longford. The verses are filled with poignancy and what’s especially poignant is that the person seated to Paul Brady’s right in this clip is the magisterial piper Liam O’Flynn who died of cancer on 14 March this year. Our grief at his loss remains unabated.

“John Bull, he boasts, he laughs with scorn
And he says that Irishman is born
To be always discontented for at home we cannot agree
But we’ll banish discord from our land
And in harmony like brothers stand
To demand the rights of Ireland, let us all united be
And our parliament in College Green
For to assemble, it will be seen
And happy days in Erin’s Isle we soon will have once more
And dear old Ireland soon will be
A great and glorious country
And peace and blessings soon will smile all round the Shamrock Shore”


The game of cards and the call of duty

Saturday, 13 January, 2018 0 Comments

The Irish writer Frank O’Connor began his career with a book of stories called Guests of the Nation (1931) and the title story begins:

“At dusk the big Englishman, Belcher, would shift his long legs out of the ashes and say, ‘Well, chums, what about it?’ and Noble and myself would say ‘All right, chum’ (for we had picked up some of their curious expressions), and the little Englishman, Hawkins, would light the lamp and bring out the cards. Sometimes Jeremiah Donovan would come up and supervise the game, and get excited over Hawkins’ cards, which he always played badly, and shout at him, as if he was one of our own, ‘Ah, you divil, why didn’t you play the tray?'”

Belcher and Hawkins are two English prisoners taken during the Irish War of Independence, being guarded by three Republican militants, to use today’s PC term, and they have all become friends. Then, news comes that some Irish prisoners have been shot by the English and orders arrive for the Republicans to shoot Belcher and Hawkins in reprisal. No one can quite believe it. None of the Republicans seem to understand what they are doing and none of their victims can comprehend what is being done to them. Belcher asks for a handkerchief to tie around his eyes as his own is too small. His captors help him tie it.

“You understand that we’re only doing our duty?” said Donovan.
Belcher’s head was raised like a blind man’s, so that you could only see his chin and the top of his nose in the lantern-light.
“I never could make out what duty was myself,” he said. “I think you’re all good lads, if that’s what you mean, I’m not complaining.”

The card players of Galbally


Musings upon the murderous Gerry Adams

Thursday, 23 November, 2017 0 Comments

“The first person the IRA murdered after Gerry Adams was elected Sinn Féin president was Charles Armstrong, the Ulster Unionist chair of Armagh City and District Council.”

Now, there’s an opening sentence that earns its keep. The writer is Newton Emerson and his Irish Times piece is titled “Licensing next war is Adams’s real legacy.” Emerson expands that opening sentence thus:

Adams became president on Sunday, November 13th, 1983. The following evening, a bomb exploded under Armstrong’s car as he left a council meeting. An SDLP colleague, Pat Brannigan, risked his life by pulling Armstrong from the burning wreckage. Armstrong left a wife and eight children, who heard the explosion from their house a few hundred yards away. Afterwards, they received threats and hate mail and were forced to move. To the IRA supporter, every victim becomes culpable by the mere fact of their victimisation.

The barbarism Gerry Adams and his Sinn Féin/IRA “comrades” exhibited in killing Charles Armstrong was part of a pattern: “Three weeks after the Armagh bomb, the law lecturer and UUP assembly member Edgar Graham was murdered by the IRA — shot eight times in the back as he left the library at Queen’s University, Belfast. He had been considered a future liberal leader of the party.”

In Ireland and abroad, Gerry Adams is celebrated as a “freedom fighter” but he’s nothing of the sort. He’s a bloodstained monster.


The Foreigner, the trailer

Thursday, 29 June, 2017 0 Comments

Tuesday’s post here, Jackie Chan goes to war with the IRA, featured a poster advertising the upcoming film The Foreigner. Now, here’s the trailer.

Directed by Martin Campbell (Casino Royale), and starring Jackie Chan, Pierce Brosnan, Liu Tao and Katie Leung, The Foreigner sees 63-year-old Chan kicking ass in his role as a father determined to avenge his daughter’s murder by Irish terrorists. What makes the film topical is that much of the action takes place in London, scene of recent terror attacks, and Liam Hennessy, the character played by Pierce Brosnan, bears an uncanny resemblance to Gerry Adams, allegedly a member of the IRA Army Council and thus responsible for atrocities such as the Harrods bombing in 1983.


Jackie Chan goes to war with the IRA

Tuesday, 27 June, 2017 0 Comments

The Foreigner is an upcoming British-Chinese thriller starring Jackie Chan, Pierce Brosnan, Liu Tao and Katie Leung. In the film, Chan plays the role of a humble restaurant owner in London’s Chinatown who’s on a mission to track down the Irish terrorists responsible for the death of his beloved daughter. Chan is forced to push his physical and psychological boundaries beyond the limits to find and bring to justice the shadowy Foreigner (Pierce Brosnan) coordinating the IRA terror campaign. Any resemblance between Pierce Brosnan and Gerry Adams is coincidental, of course, but between now and October, when the film is released, much will be written about Adams, allegedly a member of the IRA Army Council and thus responsible for atrocities such as the La Mon restaurant bombing in 1978.

The Foreigner

Directed by Martin Campbell and produced by STX Entertainment, the film is based on Stephen Leather’s novel The Chinaman. Leather wrote the book while working as night news editor on the business desk of The Times in London. At the time, the Provisional IRA terror campaign was at its height, and the book is loosely based on the IRA bombing in 1983 of the Harrods department store in London.


Binning Corbyn

Thursday, 8 June, 2017 0 Comments

Nick Cohen describes himself as “a passionate leftist and liberal,” but he won’t be voting for Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn in today’s United Kingdom general election. Writing in the Spectator’s Coffee House section, Cohen offers a list of facts about Corbyn “which have not previously been collated in one place” and orders them under three headings: “Ethics, Leadership & Electability, and Social Media & Activists.” Nick Cohen says, “The reader can make up their own mind, based on these facts.”

One heading is of particular interest here and is titled “Against peace in Ireland.” Cohen says that Corbyn supported the IRA, opposed the Northern Ireland peace process and aligned himself with terrorists. Sample:

“Corbyn was general secretary of the editorial board of the hard-left journal Labour Briefing which supported IRA violence and explicitly backed the Brighton Hotel Bombing, which killed 5 people and maimed 31 others. In its December 1984 leader, the editorial board ‘disassociated itself’ from an article criticising the Brighton bombing, saying the criticism was a ‘serious political misjudgement’. The board said it ‘reaffirmed its support for, and solidarity with, the Irish republican movement’, and added that ‘the British only sit up and take notice when they are bombed into it’. Alongside its editorial, the board reprinted a speech by Gerry Adams describing the bombing as a ‘blow for democracy’. The same edition carried a reader’s letter praising the ‘audacity’ of the IRA attack and stating: ‘What do you call four dead Tories? A start.'”

Jeremy Corbyn is unfit for high office and British voters should reject him today.

Gerry Adams


Martin McGuinness obituary

Tuesday, 21 March, 2017 0 Comments

The death has taken place of Martin McGuinness, a key figure in the IRA terror group that killed more than 1,500 people before its political wing, Sinn Féin, embraced the compromises its peaceful opponents had articulated from the 1960s onwards.

Martin McGuinness was a cold-blooded killer who morphed into a dove but his many victims should not be forgotten in the coming rush to sanctify a legacy and burnish a myth. The poet Desmond Egan summarized the cruel futility of McGuinness’ quest in The Northern Ireland Question. It’s concise but the four lines perfectly capture the random barbarity that Martin McGuinness once practiced and endorsed.

The Northern Ireland Question

two wee girls
were playing tig near a car

how many counties would you say
are worth their scattered fingers?

Desmond Egan


The dreary quarrels of Northern Ireland re-emerge

Wednesday, 11 January, 2017 0 Comments

In a time of global turbulence, when we should be focused on issues that will affect stability and prosperity, Northern Ireland threatens to divert attention with a crisis fueled by, well, fuel, and headlined “Cash for Ash”. The bizarre Renewable Heat Incentive scandal is exposing the old tribal antagonisms and the brittle peace is endangered. Nothing new, however. Let us pause for a moment and go back a century to Winston Churchill describing the aftermath of World War I:

“The position of countries has been violently altered. The modes of thought of men, the whole outlook on affairs, the grouping of parties, all have encountered violent and tremendous change in the deluge of the world. But as the deluge subsides and the waters fall short we see the dreary steeples of Fermanagh and Tyrone emerging once again. The integrity of their quarrel is one of the few institutions that have been unaltered in the cataclysm which has swept the world.”

High Dive The integrity of that quarrel is central to the latest novel by Jonathan Lee. High Dive centres on an event that took place at the Grand Hotel in Brighton on 12 October 1984. Then, the Provisional IRA terrorists group attempted to assassinate Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and her cabinet, who were staying at the hotel for the Conservative Party conference. Although Mrs Thatcher narrowly escaped injury, five people were killed including a Conservative MP, and 31 were injured, by the long-delay time bomb planted in the hotel by the IRA.

Jonathan Lee’s book doesn’t offer an analysis of violent Irish republicanism or Tory party politics, but it excels in describing the particulars of the English hospitality trade. Lee, like so many members of the writing class, harbours some sympathy for the “rebels”, but the reader should be aware that the characters in his novel are no idealists. More than three decades after the Brighton bombing, the antagonists of Northern Ireland have turned their dreary, squalid feud into an industry that supplies their claques with cash from ash and other combustibles. The integrity of their quarrel is endless.


Book of the Year

Saturday, 19 December, 2015 2 Comments

What a twelve months it’s been for Angela Merkel: TIME Magazine anointed her its Person of the Year and the Financial Times followed suit. Even Vanessa Redgrave, that deranged old devotee of the blood-soaked PLO and the blood-drenched IRA hailed her as this year’s hero. It may be too early for Pope Francis to press her case for higher honours, but there’s already a move afoot to award her the Nobel Peace Prize.

In the light of such universal accord, it would be a brave person indeed who’d question Merkel’s Wir schaffen das (“We can do it”) approach to the challenge of accommodating one million migrants crossing Germany’s borders, but there are dissenting opinions. In fact, one was raised five years ago. In his 2010 best-seller, Deutschland schafft sich ab (Germany Is Doing Away With Itself), Thilo Sarrazin blamed the country’s suffocating multiculturalism for encouraging the growth of a hostile counter-culture. He was immediately ridiculed, his public readings were subjected to intimidation and some had to be abandoned because of attacks by PC mobs. Last year in France, Éric Zemmour mirrored Sarrazin when his Le Suicide français accused the French cultural elite of undermining the national identity, leaving the country unwilling and unable to defend itself against existential threats.

Submission Facts are interesting, opinion is good, but it’s fiction that captures the public imagination and while Sarrazin and Zemmour spurred debate, it took Michel Houellebecq to bring their contentious ideas to a mass audience. That’s why his Submission wins the Rainy Day Book of the Year award.

Submission is set in a near-future where two opposing political parties are battling for the soul of France: the National Front, which promises to return the country to its former glory, and the Muslim Brotherhood, which promises to convert it. The Brotherhood candidate Mohammed Ben Abbes becomes President with the support of the Socialist Party, which is determined to prevent a victory by Marine Le Pen at all costs. The morning after, the French wake up to a reality in which women go veiled, non-Muslims are forbidden to teach in schools and polygyny is the law of the land. All of this is related by a cast of academics and intellectuals who adjust remarkably quickly and compliantly to the new national order.

In his earlier works, Michel Houellebecq argued that the modern world, with its consumerism, individualism and hypersexuality, wrecks communities and makes people wretchedly unhappy. Patriarchy, in the form of Islam, is an alternative and in Submission it restores a sense of personal and public serenity that comforts the future French. “Europe had already committed suicide,” Houellebecq writes, echoing Zemmour. The triumph of Islam in France ends a civilization that had already surrendered, betrayed by its reputed guardians. Michel Houellebecq, as they say, goes there.

Tomorrow, here, the Rainy Day Film of the Year award.


Corruption and collusion in Ireland

Wednesday, 4 December, 2013 0 Comments

“The Corruption Perceptions Index 2013 serves as a reminder that the abuse of power, secret dealings and bribery continue to ravage societies around the world,” so says Transparency International in its latest report. Ireland finds itself in 21st position on the list, behind Uruguay but ahead of the Bahamas, but how accurately this reflects the situation in Uruguay or the Bahamas is difficult to judge as the difference between perceived corruption and actual sleaze is hard to define. The humiliation of those who suffer at the hands of dishonest bureaucrats cannot be rendered statistically; the loss of faith in governance is impossible to quantify.

In the case of Ireland, the latest blow to the credibility of its institutions came with recent revelations that charities in receipt of €1.5 billion in state funding were awarding their executives huge extra payments on top of their generous salaries. That those who make a living pleading for money to help the poor and the sick would turn out to be among the most avaricious and cosseted of fat cats is repulsive, but it neither surprises nor shocks. Much more shocking, however, are the findings of the Smithwick Tribunal, which were published yesterday. The tribunal found that Irish police leaked information to the IRA that led to two of Northern Ireland’s most senior police officers being murdered.

The tribunal was established in 2005 and spent six years examining intelligence and witness statements from police, undercover agents, IRA members and politicians during 133 days of public hearings. Three former members of An Garda Síochána, Ireland’s “guardians of the peace” — Owen Corrigan, Leo Colton and Finbarr Hickey — were granted legal representation at the tribunal but all forcefully denied allegations of collusion in the murders. The costs of the Smithwick Tribunal have been estimated at €15 million, with some €6 million going on general legal fees. But despite all the evidence and all the money, it was still unable to name those who enabled the killings. That’s shocking, but it’s not surprising.