Tag: photography

Metamorphosis: The butterfly effect

Wednesday, 22 May, 2019

Our image today is by Dublin photographer Willie Poole, who captured this composite of nature in all its beauty. The butterfly is a well-known symbol for life after death because of its metamorphosis from an ambling caterpillar to an almost ethereal flying creature. This symbolism is of great personal meaning to Willie Poole in these days.

Butterfly by Willie Poole

“How does one become butterfly?’ Pooh asked pensively.
‘You must want to fly so much that you are willing to give up being a caterpillar,’ Piglet replied.
‘You mean to die?’ asked Pooh.
‘Yes and no,’ he answered. ‘What looks like you will die, but what’s really you will live on.” — A.A. Milne


The richness of the rain

Tuesday, 14 May, 2019

“I’m a London based photographer specialising in street photography and social documentary photography,” says Joshua K. Jackson. “I’m best known for using a bold palette to help illustrate the vibrancy of life in Central London, whilst also exploring themes of diversity and disparity. My work often enters into abstraction and presents the viewer with an unfamiliar view of a familiar city.”

Jackson’s photos of rain are tactile. One can feel the clouds breaking apart and falling.

Rain


The Reiwa Era

Tuesday, 30 April, 2019

That’s what begins tomorrow in Japan when Prince Naruhito becomes the country’s 126th emperor. He will ascend the Chrysanthemum throne and lead the country into the new Reiwa era. This will mark the end of the current Heisei era, which began with today’s abdicating Emperor Akihito in 1989.

The talented young Japanese photographer Tatsuto Shibata was born in Ibaraki, a prefecture bordering the Pacific Ocean northeast of Tokyo. Shibata’s compositions oscillate between the classical and the quirky, like this Buddha.

Japan


Håkan Strand: Silent Moments

Friday, 4 January, 2019

In his foreword to Silent Moments by Håkan Strand, the sublime Swedish photographer, French critic Olivier Delhoume writes:

“In our modern society, time is accelerating. We are constantly being bombarded with trivial or commercial images, and through the media and internet, we are even affected by human, economic and geopolitical situations far away. Håkan Strand offers us a different approach to experiencing the world and ourselves. His photography offers us a refuge from the racing whirlwind of our thoughts.

Håkan Strand’s calming approach is reflected through his use of traditional black and white analogue photography, which pays tribute to the tradition of the great masters. This is his own way of battling the fast pace and excesses of modern life.”

Snow  in Sweden


Barcelona for the AIR

Saturday, 7 October, 2017 0 Comments

Vincent Laforet is a French-American director and photographer and one of the most influential people working in contemporary photography and film today. His AIR project is a collection of high-altitude aerial photographs taken over 10 of the world’s most iconic cities: Barcelona, Berlin, Chicago, Las Vegas, London, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, San Francisco and Sydney. This is Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, with its arrays of perfectly honeycomb-like blocks.

Barcelona


A minor Martin Parr moment

Wednesday, 27 September, 2017 0 Comments

The great British photographer Martin Parr is famed for intimate images that often take a sardonic look at life. His seaside images are particularly revealing in their depiction of the different social strata at play. This non-Parr photo is a tribute to the master.

A Parr moment


Parr near and far in Ireland

Saturday, 8 October, 2016 0 Comments

The great British photographer Martin Parr lived in Ireland, in Boyle, Co. Roscommon, between 1981 and 1983. So Near and So Far is the title of an exhibition of his pictures from the region that runs until Tuesday at the Roscommon Arts Centre. The images are included in Parr’s book A Fair Day: Photographs from the West Coast of Ireland.

Parr in Ireland


iPhone 7 photos

Monday, 12 September, 2016 0 Comments

No, not photos of the iPhone 7; photos by the iPhone 7. The first thing that has to be said is these look like professional magazine photos, not smartphone photos. The depth of field is really impressive. Thoughts: Is this the final nail in the coffin of consumer stand-alone cameras? And will next year’s iPhone 8 camera allow 3D capture for object and VR? Anyway, here’s the story:

“On Sunday, Sports Illustrated photographer David E. Klutho took photos with the new iPhone 7 Plus camera at the Titans-Vikings game. The iPhone 7 Plus has a 12–megapixel telephoto camera that offers new zooming capabilities. Each new model also features a wider aperture and a lens that allows the camera to capture brighter and more vibrant colors in photos and videos.”

iPhone7 photos


A Drone’s Eye View Of Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way

Wednesday, 28 January, 2015 0 Comments

Meandering from Cork to Donegal, the Wild Atlantic Way is Ireland’s longest coastal touring route. This beautiful drone footage of the trail is by the talented UAV/drone pilot and photographer Raymond Fogarty.

By the way, Raymond Fogarty made headlines last year when it emerged that drone photographers in Ireland needed licensing by the Irish Aviation Authority. And the regulation of these “unmanned aerial vehicles” is very much in the news this week after it emerged that an employee of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency had (drunkenly?) flown a drone onto the grounds of the White House. This has led President Obama to call for regulating unmanned aircraft: “There are incredibly useful functions that these drones can play in terms of farmers who are managing crops and conservationists who want to take stock of wildlife,” he said. “But we don’t really have any kind of regulatory structure at all for it.”

Meanwhile, take a look at Dronestagram, a website where drone photographers share and discuss their work. Love this shot of the sun setting over the town of Annecy in south-eastern France.

This just in: UAE plans new drones law following Dubai airspace alert


Day and Night in New York City

Thursday, 6 June, 2013 0 Comments

Photographer Stephen Wilkes creates extraordinary blended images by taking photos of a single scene over and over for 15 hours. Here, where Fifth Avenue and Broadway cross paths in Manhattan at the prow of the Flatiron Building, he has made night and day part of a seamless urban scene.

Day and night in New York


No man’s land in Italy

Friday, 31 May, 2013 0 Comments

In an excellent essay for The New Inquiry, Teju Cole mediates on the approach of photography’s third century and introduces us to the work of Mishka Henner, a photographer working with images from Google Earth and Google Street View.

Says Cole: “Henner uses Google Earth to look at pixelated images of secret, usually military, locations in the Netherlands; it is a bracing update of the Dutch landscape tradition. In another project, made using Google Street View and titled ‘No Man’s Land,’ he finds images of sex workers standing on the roadside in rural Italian locations, most of them alone, and most in broad daylight. The images are painful and poignant, but the surprise is that there are so many to be found.”

Italy