Tag: Rolling Stones

The twelfth post of pre-Christmas 2018: December

Monday, 24 December, 2018

And thus ends our review of the year as posted by Rainy Day since 1 January this year. The last post in this pre-Christmas 2018 series dates from 10 December and it was titled, “Street Fighting Man in Paris, then and now.” The reason for picking this post are twofold: firstly, the mouvement des gilets jaunes, which has exposed the hollowness at the heart of Emmanuel Macron’s own “movement” and, secondly, the 50th anniversary of Street Fighting Man by the Rolling Stones. There is a synchronicity, as Jung would say.

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Fifty years ago, the Rolling Stones released their Beggars Banquet album. It contained what’s been called the group’s “most political song,” Street Fighting Man. Mick Jagger said that he found partial inspiration for the song in the violence among student rioters in Paris during the run up to the civil unrest of May 1968. Quote:

“It was a very strange time in France. But not only in France but also in America, because of the Vietnam War and these endless disruptions … I thought it was a very good thing at the time. There was all this violence going on. I mean, they almost toppled the government in France; de Gaulle went into this complete funk, as he had in the past, and he went and sort of locked himself in his house in the country. And so the government was almost inactive. And the French riot police were amazing.”

To mark the 50th anniversary of Street Fighting Man, the band have released a video of the song featuring the lyrics. Uncannily, this is again a strange time in France. Whether M. Macron will go into a complete funk and lock himself into his house in the country remains to be seen. Those French riot police are still amazing, though.

Tomorrow, here, something less disruptive: Christmas Day as seen through the eyes of a poet who was once six Christmases of age.


Street Fighting Man in Paris, then and now

Monday, 10 December, 2018

Fifty years ago, the Rolling Stones released their Beggars Banquet album. It contained what’s been called the group’s “most political song,” Street Fighting Man. Mick Jagger said that he found partial inspiration for the song in the violence among student rioters in Paris during the run up to the civil unrest of May 1968. Quote:

“It was a very strange time in France. But not only in France but also in America, because of the Vietnam War and these endless disruptions … I thought it was a very good thing at the time. There was all this violence going on. I mean, they almost toppled the government in France; de Gaulle went into this complete funk, as he had in the past, and he went and sort of locked himself in his house in the country. And so the government was almost inactive. And the French riot police were amazing.”

To mark the 50th anniversary of Street Fighting Man, the band have released a video of the song featuring the lyrics. Uncannily, this is again a strange time in France. Whether M. Macron will go into a complete funk and lock himself into his house in the country remains to be seen. Those French riot police are still amazing, though.


Havana Moon

Saturday, 24 September, 2016 0 Comments

Good Friday, 25 March 2016: The Rolling Stones play a huge, free outdoor concert in Havana. The show was filmed by Paul Dugdale and the result, HAVANA MOON, was premiered on cinema screens around the world for one night only, last night. It was a mighty concert and the film captures the essence of the history it represented. Standout songs: Midnight Rambler, with Mick Jagger at his balletic best; Gimme Shelter, with Sasha Allen providing backing vocals and sexy interaction, and a stunning version of Satisfaction that will forever be remembered by those who have had the good fortune to see and hear the greatest rock band, ever.


Hey! Said my name is called disturbance

Saturday, 18 April, 2015 0 Comments

It’s 1968 and 70,000 North Vietnamese forces launch their daring Tet Offensive. Meanwhile, in the other major theatre of the Cold War conflict, the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact allies invade Czechoslovakia and snuff out the Prague Spring. A year of living dangerously, then, and a perfect time for the Rolling Stones to release Beggars Banquet. Key tracks: Sympathy for the Devil, which conjures up the decline of Western civilization, and Street Fighting Man with its brazen demand for “a palace revolution”. Hat tip to Ian for the loan of the album.

“Hey! Said my name is called disturbance
I’ll shout and scream, I’ll kill the king, I’ll rail at all his servants
Well, what can a poor boy do
Except to sing for a rock ‘n’ roll band
‘Cause in sleepy London town
There’s just no place for a street fighting man.”


It’s just a shot away

Saturday, 11 April, 2015 0 Comments

Released in 1969, Let It Bleed is one of the greatest of all rock albums, but if you’re looking for flower power, move on. That whole hippie thing was a hoax, say the Rolling Stones as they bury the Sixties with the standout track Gimme Shelter, a primal scream of mayhem that Keith Richards composed in 20 minutes, allegedly.

The guest vocalist on the 1969 album was Merry Clayton and her place was taken on tour by Lisa Fischer, recently of 20 Feet From Stardom fame. In this 1995 performance at the Paradiso in Amsterdam, Lisa Fischer is very much the star, however, despite the initial intrusion of Jack Nicholson. Hat tip to Ian for the loan of the album.


Mick Jagger at 70

Friday, 26 July, 2013 0 Comments

He once said, in the heady excess of youth, “I’d rather be dead than singing Satisfaction when I’m 45.” Today, Mick Jagger is 70 and he’s still singing Satisfaction. Of all the odd things Jagger has done over the past seven decades, his playing the title role in Ned Kelly, a 1970 British-Australian film directed by Tony Richardson, has to be among the most extraordinary. In this clip from the movie, he sings “The Wild Colonial Boy”, a ballad about a young emigrant who left Kerry in Ireland for Australia in the early 19th century. Jack Donahue/Jack Doolan/Jack Duggan spent his time “robbing from the rich to feed the poor” before he was fatally wounded in an ambush. He didn’t make it to 45.


When the Rolling Stones do come to Worthy Farm

Saturday, 22 June, 2013 0 Comments

Much to the consternation of the Thane of Glamis, Great Birnam Wood did come to Dunsinane Hill and much to the consternation of those critics who wrote off the Rolling Stones a generation ago, this most perpetual of rock bands will play at Worthy Farm in Somerset next Saturday. Many of the grandparents of those attending Glastonbury Festival would have bought something called a “double LP” in May 1972 titled Exile on Main St. by these same Rolling Stones and they would have danced blissfully to All Down the Line. Here’s hoping the “boys” will play it down on the farm.

“Heard the diesel drumming, all down the line.
Heard the wires a humming, all down the line.
Heard the women sighing, all down the line.
Heard the children crying, all down the line.”