Tag: Vanity Fair

Microsoft could make a phone with LinkedIn

Tuesday, 14 June, 2016 0 Comments

Last year, LinkedIn’s revenues were almost $3 billion, but it recorded a net loss of $166 million. Most of its income comes from the “talent solutions” division, which charges recruiters to advertise jobs and use the company’s data, but the rest of the network is loss making. So why is Microsoft paying $26 billion for it, then? And what will it do with this new acquisition? Paul Ford has come up with a list of 9 Things Microsoft Could Do With LinkedIn. Example:

4. Microsoft could make a phone with LinkedIn.

What? No. What? Stop. The Facebook phone was a disaster (remember? I remember.) But there’s still probably some bizarre and monstrous Blackberry-esque WindowsLinkedPhone that could happen — something that jams all the messaging through LinkedIn accounts. It could even work with SharePoint. Can you imagine?

Who will be bought up/out next? Twitter shares are rising and the talk is that Google could snap it up by the year end. Vanity Fair: Why Microsoft’s $26.2 Billion Linkedin Acquisition Is Good News For Twitter. The same Vanity Fair has a portrait of Jack Dorsey, the Twitter CEO, in the current issue. Snippet: “…he wistfully talked about the group of people, mostly friends, who helped hatch Twitter in that rodent-infested basement. Some of them became billionaires, others ended up with nothing, but most no longer speak to one another. ‘It was such a good team. It just became so screwy, and confusing. I don’t know what happened. I don’t regret it. I feel sad about it,’ he said, his voice trailing off into the night.”

All of this is good preparation for the day when Jack has to write the kind of email that LinkedIn CEO, Jeff Weiner, wrote to employees yesterday:

“No matter what you’re feeling now, give yourself some time to process the news. You might feel a sense of excitement, fear, sadness, or some combination of all of those emotions. Every member of the exec team has experienced the same, but we’ve had months to process. Regardless of the ups and downs, we’ve come out the other side knowing beyond a shadow of a doubt, this is the best thing for our company.”


Christopher Hitchens on Charlie Hebdo

Friday, 9 January, 2015 1 Comment

In February 2006, the late, much lamented Christopher Hitchens addressed the “international Muslim pogrom against the free press”. In light of the Charlie Hebdo massacre, his words are need re-reading today:

“When Salman Rushdie published The Satanic Verses in 1988, he did so in the hope of forwarding a discussion that was already opening in the Muslim world, between extreme Quranic literalists and those who hoped that the text could be interpreted. We know what his own reward was, and we sometimes forget that the fatwa was directed not just against him but against ‘all those involved in its publication,’ which led to the murder of the book’s Japanese translator and the near-deaths of another translator and one publisher. I went on Crossfire at one point, to debate some spokesman for outraged faith, and said that we on our side would happily debate the propriety of using holy writ for literary and artistic purposes. But that we would not exchange a word until the person on the other side of the podium had put away his gun.”


Dying industry turns to terror and necrophilia

Thursday, 1 August, 2013 1 Comment

In a world where Google and Facebook are rewriting the rules of global media production and consumption, the traditional entertainment magazine must contemplate the writing on the wall. Still, there’s fight left in the old dog as Rolling Stone demonstrated recently when, in search of sales and publicity, it applied a touch of Che chic to suspected terrorist Dzhokhar Tsarnaev by placing him on its cover. Instead of flogging alleged killers, Vanity Fair opts for the dead with its September cover, which features Princess Diana. This highly cynical move is clearly timed it to coincide with the recent royal baby birth. The photo, taken by Mario Testino in 1997, is beautiful beyond words, but its blatant necrophiliac use by Vanity Fair is offensive in the extreme.

Vanity Fair


She’s like, he’s like, Huh.

Tuesday, 7 May, 2013 0 Comments

“On a beach walk one day, Nicole told him she would be reluctant to use the app he was working on because her pictures would never be as good as the ones a mutual friend took. ‘I said, ‘Well, you know what he does to those photos, right?’ She’s like, ‘No, he just takes good photos.’ I’m like, ‘No, no, he puts them through filter apps.’ She’s like, ‘Well, you guys should probably have filters too, right, then?’ I was like, ‘Huh.'”

Excerpt there from The Money Shot, a superb profile of Instagram founder Kevin Systrom by Kara Swisher in Vanity Fair.

To get an idea of the photographic revolution ushered in by the smartphone, take a look at the magnificent work of Richard Koci Hernandez.

Richard Koci Hernandez


Gore Vidal: 1925 — 2012

Wednesday, 1 August, 2012

Among the celebrated works of the late Gore Vidal, wit, essayist, playwright, historian, author, provocateur, gay icon, conspiracy theorist, would-be-senator and former resident of Ravello on the Amalfi Coast, was Lincoln: A Novel. On the back of this, back in 2005, Vanity Fair asked him to assess C. A. Tripp’s much-discussed, hotly-disputed The Intimate World […]

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Journalism at its worst and its best

Thursday, 12 January, 2012

Toby Young, author, associate editor of The Spectator, Daily Telegraph blogger and co-founder of the West London Free School, selects five books for The Browser that exemplify good reporting — or satirise it mercilessly. In between, he peppers the interview with quotable bits such as, “I remember seeing a photograph on the Vanity Fair contributor page of a member of staff with his arm around Tom Cruise, grinning from ear to ear — the same journalist who had interviewed Cruise in that issue. I thought, ‘That interview won’t be worth reading.'”